Mercury City Tower Download PDF


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Height: Occupied
293 m / 961 ft
 
Height: To Tip
338.8 m / 1,112 ft
Height: Architectural
338.8 m / 1,112 ft
 
Mercury City Tower Outline
Floors Above Ground
75
Floors Below Ground
5
# of Elevators
31
Top Elevator Speed
7 m/s
Tower GFA
173,960 m² / 1,872,490 ft²
# of Apartments
137
# of Parking Spaces
437

Facts

Official Name Mercury City Tower
Structure Type Building
Status Completed
Country Russia
City Moscow
Street Address & Map 15, 1st Krasnogvardeysky Avenue
Building Functions residential / office
Structural Material concrete
Proposed 2006
Construction Start 2006
Completion 2013
Official Website Mercury City Tower
Rankings Click arrows to view the next taller/shorter buildings
Global Ranking #39 Tallest in the World
Regional Ranking #1 Tallest in Europe
National Ranking #1 Tallest in Russia
City Ranking #1 Tallest in Moscow

Companies Involved

Owner Mercury City Tower
Developer Liedel Investments Limited; Mercury Development
Architect
Design Frank Williams & Associates; M.M.Posokhin
Architect of Record Gennadiy Sirota; International High-Rise Construction Centre LLC
Structural Engineer
Design Rosenwasser/Grossman Consulting Engineers P.C.
Engineer of Record International High-Rise Construction Centre LLC
MEP Engineer
Design Cosentini
Engineer of Record International High-Rise Construction Centre LLC
Project Manager HSG Zander
Main Contractor HSG Zander; Rasen Construction Co. Inc.; Waterman Group
Other Consultant
• Acoustics Cerami Associates
Façade Heintges & Associates
• Façade Maintenance Entek Engineering Ltd.
• Geotechnical Mueser Rutledge Consulting Engineers
• Landscape M. Paul Friedberg and Partners
• Vertical Transportation Jaros, Baum & Bolles
• Wind RWDI
Material Supplier
• Elevator ThyssenKrupp

About Mercury City Tower

Mercury City Tower is located in Moscow’s bustling International Business Center, a collection of high-rises similar in nature to London’s Canary Wharf and Paris’ La Defense, though it is intended to be much larger in scale. The tower’s distinctive shape allows it to stand out in a busy skyline, but more than its shape, its blazing copper-colored cladding is what makes it unique. The building was originally designed to be surfaced in reflective silver glass in order to mirror the buildings surrounding it, but eventually came to be wrapped in equally reflective bronze-tinted glass. Thanks to its inimitable façade, the tower exhibits a constant glow that makes it appear as though it is continually immersed in the light of the sun on the horizon.

Along with its cladding, Mercury City is memorable for its setback design. The building steps back twice along its northwestern façade, creating a tapering effect that augments the buildings height in tandem with the vertical striping that defines its corners. Each setback has a slanted roof that reinforces the illusion of added height. Though the tower is visually distinct, its façade lacks unnecessary adornments. Rather, the structure and its cladding act together to create a purposeful, clean design. In this way, the building falls squarely into the Structural Expressionist style of architecture.

Located along the topmost floors, the building’s apartments are designed with the flexibility to merge units together, adding to the tower’s overall space efficiency. The building also features a smart “energy cycle” system that regulates energy usage, ambient temperatures, and hot water distribution throughout the development. Although the design of Mercury City is in no way traditional, the typical three-part massing of the volume, comprising a base, core, and crown, imparts the Russian imperatives of strength, reliability, and stability.

Global News

Parisian Skyscraper Pair May Move Forward
18 Sep 2013 – Paris

Moscow-City's Resurrection
4 Apr 2013 – Moscow

Moscow Tower Overtakes The Shard
1 Nov 2012 – Moscow

Research Papers

Year in Review: Tall Trends of 2014
Dec 2014 – CTBUH Journal, 2015 Issue I

Year in Review: Tall Trends of 2013
Dec 2013 – CTBUH Journal, 2014 Issue I

Tall Buildings in Numbers: The Past, Present and Future of the European Skyscraper
May 2013 – CTBUH Journal, 2013 Issue II