6 Remez Tower
Tel Aviv
Height

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

1
To Tip:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).

117.9 m / 387 ft
2
Architectural:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

117.9 m / 387 ft
3
Occupied:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest occupied floor within the building.

107.6 m / 353 ft
1 2 3 6 Remez Tower Outline
Floors

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

32
Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

6
Height 117.9 m / 387 ft
Floors 32
Official Name

The current legal building name.

6 Remez Tower
Other Names

Other names the building has commonly been known as, including former names, common informal names, local names, etc.

Remez Arlozorov Tower
Type

CTBUH collects data on two major types of tall structures: 'Buildings' and 'Telecommunications / Observation Towers.' A 'Building' is a structure where at least 50% of the height is occupied by usable floor area. A 'Telecommunications / Observation Tower' is a structure where less than 50% of the structure's height is occupied by usable floor area. Only 'Buildings' are eligible for the CTBUH 'Tallest Buildings' lists.

Building
Status
Completed
Architecturally Topped Out
Structurally Topped Out
Under Construction
Proposed
On Hold
Never Completed
Vision
Competition Entry
Canceled
Proposed Renovation
Under Renovation
Renovated
Under Demolition
Demolished
Completed, 2013
Country

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of Country, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

City

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of City, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

Address
Function

A single-function tall building is defined as one where 85% or more of its usable floor area is dedicated to a single usage. Thus a building with 90% office floor area would be said to be an "office" building, irrespective of other minor functions it may also contain.

A mixed-use tall building contains two or more functions (or uses), where each of the functions occupy a significant proportion of the tower's total space. Support areas such as car parks and mechanical plant space do not constitute mixed-use functions. Functions are denoted on CTBUH "Tallest Building" lists in descending order, e.g., "hotel/office" indicates hotel function above office function.

residential
Structural Material

Steel
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from steel. Note that a building of steel construction with a floor system of concrete planks or concrete slab on top of steel beams is still considered a “steel” structure as the concrete elements are not acting as the primary structure.

Reinforced Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from concrete which has been cast in place and utilizes steel reinforcement bars.

Precast Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning system are constructed from steel reinforced concrete which has been precast as individual components and assembled together on-site.

Mixed-Structure
Utilizes distinct systems (e.g. steel, concrete, timber), one on top of the other. For example, a steel/concrete indicates a steel structural system located on top of a concrete structural system, with the opposite true of concrete/steel.

Composite
A combination of materials (e.g. steel, concrete, timber) are used together in the main structural elements. Examples include buildings which utilize: steel columns with a floor system of reinforced concrete beams; a steel frame system with a concrete core; concrete-encased steel columns; concrete-filled steel tubes; etc. Where known, the CTBUH database breaks out the materials used in a composite building’s core, columns, and floor spanning separately.

concrete
Height

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

Architectural
117.9 m / 387 ft
To Tip
117.9 m / 387 ft
Occupied
107.62 m / 353 ft
Floors Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

32
Floors Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

6
# of Apartments

Number of Apartments refers to the total number of residential units (including both rental units and condominiums) contained within a particular building.

40
# of Parking Spaces

Number of Parking Spaces refers to the total number of car parking spaces contained within a particular building.

268
# of Elevators

Number of Elevators refers to the total number of elevator cars (not shafts) contained within a particular building (including public, private and freight elevators).

3
Tower GFA

Tower GFA refers to the total gross floor area within the tower footprint, not including adjoining podiums, connected buildings or other towers within the development.

15,900 m² / 171,146 ft²
Construction Schedule
2007

Proposed

2008

Construction Start

2013

Completed

Developer
CTU Investments Ltd.
Architect
Do-Architecture
Structural Engineer
MEP Engineer
Bar Akiva Engineers Ltd; Iser Goldish Consulting LTD
Contractor
U. Dori Construction Ltd.

Elevator

CTBUH Awards & Distinctions

Best Tall Building Middle East & Africa 2013 Award of Excellence

2013 CTBUH Awards

Videos

07 November 2013 | Tel Aviv

Moshe Tzur discusses 6 Remez Tower, a Best Tall Building Europe Middle East & Africa Finalist. Moshe discusses the design features including the view, dual...

About 6 Remez Tower

The 6 Remez tower is an unusual residential tower in several aspects. Perhaps most striking is its structural system, which uses an off-center core and minimal interior columns, a design move more common to office buildings, so as to afford wide, sweeping views to occupants and maximum flexibility for tenant improvements.

The core has two lobbies on each typical floor. The front lobby acts as a reception area, which can be considered an extension of the apartments themselves, while the second lobby is located in the back for service purposes. This concept dramatically enhances firefighter safety, by defining the back lobby as a safe deployment space on each floor.

Aesthetically, the tower reads as a complete object, sidestepping volumetric complexity in favor of simplicity. The composition is that of a monolithic urban sculpture, wrapped in a lace-like glass skin. The inner glass shades create a rhythm of gentle hues and textures, which account for the light and shimmering appearance of the tower. This is the first time that a tower façade has been entirely covered with an aluminum wire mesh, which also serves to conceal the VRV (Variable Refrigerant Volume) system located in each apartment.

A new curtain-wall system was developed for this project with Kawneer. This system includes an inward-opening window. This specific detail played a crucial part in shaping the overall appearance of the structural curtain wall, which also incorporates shades in the spandrels as well as in the vision glass. The low-E coating complements the shading system, while low-iron exterior glass affords thermal values appropriate to the hot climate. Electronically operated Venetian blinds complete the protective system. The effect of all these elements working together is to create a unique texture for the whole tower.

The tower is located in the heart of Tel Aviv, next to a main east-west urban axis. Oriented west, toward the sea, the tower’s plan is asymmetrical, and serves to connecting the tower to its urban and functional context. The balconies all face west, while smooth glass facades create a clean geometric volume on the north and south sides, beyond which the balconies do not extend. The aluminum wire mesh forms the finish material for the core exterior concrete walls, and is carefully articulated in two directions, creating an constantly changing appearance as the sun arcs overhead throughout the day.

The project includes a small park north of the tower. Plantings in the park are located strategically so as to minimize undesirable wind effects from the tower for park users. With a subtle entrance via the garden, rather than directly from the street, the park is open to the public at all times. Its landscape design is based upon the typology of a leaf in plan view, and features reflecting and biological pools. The arrangement of the basement, car park and overall building footprint leave 20 percent of the plot free of built structures or hardscapes, in order to allow water to penetrate the soil naturally. In these ways, the park mitigates the effects of the tower’s height, allowing it to intervene gently in the existing urban fabric, while giving the public a place to dwell.

CTBUH Awards & Distinctions

Best Tall Building Middle East & Africa 2013 Award of Excellence

2013 CTBUH Awards

07 November 2013 | Tel Aviv

Moshe Tzur discusses 6 Remez Tower, a Best Tall Building Europe Middle East & Africa Finalist. Moshe discusses the design features including the view, dual...

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