Boutique Monaco

Seoul
Height
1
To Tip:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).

117 m / 384 ft
2
Architectural:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

117 m / 384 ft
3
Occupied:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest occupied floor within the building.

101.3 m / 332 ft
1 2 3 Boutique Monaco Outline
Floors
Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

27
Height 117 m / 384 ft
Floors 27
Official Name
The current legal building name.

Boutique Monaco

Other Names
Other names the building has commonly been known as, including former names, common informal names, local names, etc.

Missing Matrix Building

Type
CTBUH collects data on two major types of tall structures: 'Buildings' and 'Telecommunications / Observation Towers.' A 'Building' is a structure where at least 50% of the height is occupied by usable floor area. A 'Telecommunications / Observation Tower' is a structure where less than 50% of the structure's height is occupied by usable floor area. Only 'Buildings' are eligible for the CTBUH 'Tallest Buildings' lists.

Building

Status
Completed
Architecturally Topped Out
Structurally Topped Out
Under Construction
Proposed
On Hold
Never Completed
Vision
Competition Entry
Canceled
Proposed Renovation
Under Renovation
Renovated
Under Demolition
Demolished

Completed

Completion

2008

Country
The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of Country, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

South Korea

City
The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of City, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

Seoul

Function
A single-function tall building is defined as one where 85% or more of its usable floor area is dedicated to a single usage. Thus a building with 90% office floor area would be said to be an "office" building, irrespective of other minor functions it may also contain.

A mixed-use tall building contains two or more functions (or uses), where each of the functions occupy a significant proportion of the tower's total space. Support areas such as car parks and mechanical plant space do not constitute mixed-use functions. Functions are denoted on CTBUH "Tallest Building" lists in descending order, e.g., "hotel/office" indicates hotel function above office function.

office

Structural Material
Steel
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from steel. Note that a building of steel construction with a floor system of concrete planks or concrete slab on top of steel beams is still considered a “steel” structure as the concrete elements are not acting as the primary structure.

Reinforced Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from concrete which has been cast in place and utilizes steel reinforcement bars.

Precast Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning system are constructed from steel reinforced concrete which has been precast as individual components and assembled together on-site.

Mixed-Structure
Utilizes distinct systems (e.g. steel, concrete, timber), one on top of the other. For example, a steel/concrete indicates a steel structural system located on top of a concrete structural system, with the opposite true of concrete/steel.

Composite
A combination of materials (e.g. steel, concrete, timber) are used together in the main structural elements. Examples include buildings which utilize: steel columns with a floor system of reinforced concrete beams; a steel frame system with a concrete core; concrete-encased steel columns; concrete-filled steel tubes; etc. Where known, the CTBUH database breaks out the materials used in a composite building’s core, columns, and floor spanning separately.

concrete

Height
Architectural
Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

117 m / 384 ft

To Tip
Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).
117 m / 384 ft
Occupied
Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest occupied floor within the building.
101.3 m / 332 ft
Floors Above Ground
The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

27

# of Elevators
Number of Elevators refers to the total number of elevator cars (not shafts) contained within a particular building (including public, private and freight elevators).

10

Tower GFA
Tower GFA refers to the total gross floor area within the tower footprint, not including adjoining podiums, connected buildings or other towers within the development.

54,860 m² / 590,508 ft²

Construction Schedule
2005

Construction Start

2008

Completed

Owner
Bumwoo Co., Ltd.
Developer
Leadway Co., Ltd.
Architect
Design

Usually involved in the front end design, with a "typical" condition being that of a leadership role through either Schematic Design or Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

MASS Studies
Structural Engineer
Design

The Design Engineer is usually involved in the front end design, typically taking the leadership role in the Schematic Design and Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

TEO Structure
MEP Engineer
Design

The Design Engineer is usually involved in the front end design, typically taking the leadership role in the Schematic Design and Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Hana Consulting Engineers
Contractor
Main Contractor

The main contractor is the supervisory contractor of all construction work on a project, management of sub-contractors and vendors, etc. May be referred to as "Construction Manager," however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Main Contractor" exclusively.

GS Engineering & Construction

CTBUH Awards & Distinctions

Best Tall Building Asia & Australasia 2009 Award of Excellence

2009 CTBUH Awards

CTBUH Initiatives

Boutique Monaco Chosen as Featured Building

15 June 2011 - Featured Building

The Frozen Han: Wintry Seoul

19 January 2011 - Event

About Boutique Monaco

This project involves the construction of a tower whose lower levels are composed of commercial, cultural, and community spaces and whose upper floors, from the 5th to 27th, are officetels, which are residences that could also be used as offices during the day. To ensure the maximum building footprint ratio (40%) as well as optimal natural light conditions (southern exposure), a “C”-shaped plan is extruded into a 27-story tower consistent with the Domino Matrix to reach a height of 100 meters (328ft), the maximum height allowed by law. If this plan with a maximum footprint ratio had been simply repeated vertically, the total floor space would have exceeded the legally allowed amount by approximately 10%. To reduce this mass then, missing matrices are introduced to meet the maximum floor area ratio throughout the building, with a pattern of carved out space.

These 15 “missing” spaces allow the building to gain more exterior surfaces and corners for enhanced lighting and viewing conditions. The spaces created by missing matrices are landscaped with trees that are visible from the inside and outside of the building. Inside the tower a total of 49 different types of units, 172 units in total, are arranged heterogeneously to reflect/exploit the rich spatial conditions. For example, in the area created by the 15 missing matrices, there are 40 units with bridges that split public (living/dining area) and private spaces (bedroom) within the individual units, along with 22 units which have gardens. In addition, protruding spiral staircases are included within the missing matrices, further adding to the vibrancy of the program. The roof is another garden, private to the residents only. Similar to the second, third, and fourth floors, a trussed bridge connects the opposite ends to allow for spectacular views.

On the ground floor, the building opens up and connects to its surroundings with its urban park. The sidewalks are spacious at 9 meters (30ft) from its southern end, 10 meters (33ft) from the west, and 6 meters (20ft) from the east, allowing for small gardens and benches to provide a space of rest. The tall spaces of the first floor are occupied by retail stores and coffee shops alike, and they further encourage the use and the livelihood of this exterior space. At either end of this “U”-shaped floor plan are the lobbies for the residents, which are also strategically placed to be the closest from the parking drop-off zone. The center of the building front opens up to elevators and escalators connecting to the cultural functions below and more retail stores above, as well as a small pocket park in the center of the site, to be appropriated as a cozy enclosure to pause in the midst of this metropolis.

The second and third floors are composed of luxury retail shops. Along with the fourth floor, a glass bridge with a bamboo garden on both sides spans 20 meters (66ft) to complete the “U”-shaped floor plan into a full loop, enhancing its spatial functionality by completing the floor’s circulation.

The fourth floor has community facilities for the residents of the building. A bar/lounge space with the possibility of meetings and gatherings is placed in the center, with a business center, conference room, and two guest rooms branching out to the east, and a fitness center, locker room, shower facilities, and a maintenance office to the west.

CTBUH Awards & Distinctions

Best Tall Building Asia & Australasia 2009 Award of Excellence

2009 CTBUH Awards

15 June 2011

Boutique Monaco Chosen as Featured Building

Boutique Monaco pushes beyond the extruded glass box, creating a dynamic and varied massing with its 15 voids distributed throughout its overall “U”-shaped form.

26 January 2011

The Frozen Han: Wintry Seoul

CTBUH Executive Director Antony Wood and 12 advanced architectural students from the Illinois Institute of Technology visit Seoul to work on a hypothetical tall building design project.

12 May 2010

Seoul, Songdo and Meetings

Executive Director, Antony Wood, embarked to Seoul to begin the organization of the anticipated Seoul 2011 conference and tour local tall buildings.