111 West 57th Street

New York City

Note: As this project is architecturally topped out, the data is based on the most reliable information currently available. This data is thus subject to change until the building has completed and all information can be confirmed and ratified by the CTBUH.

Height
1
To Tip:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).

435.3 m / 1,428 ft
2
Architectural:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

435.3 m / 1,428 ft
3
Occupied:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest occupied floor within the building.

345.5 m / 1,134 ft
1 2 3 111 West 57th Street Outline
Floors
Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

84
Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

1
Height 435.3 m / 1,428 ft
Floors 84
Official Name
The current legal building name.

111 West 57th Street

Other Names
Other names the building has commonly been known as, including former names, common informal names, local names, etc.

Stairway to Heaven, Steinway Tower, 105 West 57th Street, 107 West 57th Street

Type
CTBUH collects data on two major types of tall structures: 'Buildings' and 'Telecommunications / Observation Towers.' A 'Building' is a structure where at least 50% of the height is occupied by usable floor area. A 'Telecommunications / Observation Tower' is a structure where less than 50% of the structure's height is occupied by usable floor area. Only 'Buildings' are eligible for the CTBUH 'Tallest Buildings' lists.

Building

Status
Completed
Architecturally Topped Out
Structurally Topped Out
Under Construction
Proposed
On Hold
Never Completed
Vision
Competition Entry
Canceled
Proposed Renovation
Under Renovation
Renovated
Under Demolition
Demolished

Architecturally Topped Out

Country
The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of Country, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

United States

City
The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of City, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

New York City

Postal Code

10019

Function
A single-function tall building is defined as one where 85% or more of its usable floor area is dedicated to a single usage. Thus a building with 90% office floor area would be said to be an "office" building, irrespective of other minor functions it may also contain.

A mixed-use tall building contains two or more functions (or uses), where each of the functions occupy a significant proportion of the tower's total space. Support areas such as car parks and mechanical plant space do not constitute mixed-use functions. Functions are denoted on CTBUH "Tallest Building" lists in descending order, e.g., "hotel/office" indicates hotel function above office function.

residential

Structural Material
Steel
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from steel. Note that a building of steel construction with a floor system of concrete planks or concrete slab on top of steel beams is still considered a “steel” structure as the concrete elements are not acting as the primary structure.

Reinforced Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from concrete which has been cast in place and utilizes steel reinforcement bars.

Precast Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning system are constructed from steel reinforced concrete which has been precast as individual components and assembled together on-site.

Mixed-Structure
Utilizes distinct systems (e.g. steel, concrete, timber), one on top of the other. For example, a steel/concrete indicates a steel structural system located on top of a concrete structural system, with the opposite true of concrete/steel.

Composite
A combination of materials (e.g. steel, concrete, timber) are used together in the main structural elements. Examples include buildings which utilize: steel columns with a floor system of reinforced concrete beams; a steel frame system with a concrete core; concrete-encased steel columns; concrete-filled steel tubes; etc. Where known, the CTBUH database breaks out the materials used in a composite building’s core, columns, and floor spanning separately.

steel/concrete

Official Website

111 West 57th Street

Height
Architectural
Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

435.3 m / 1,428 ft

To Tip
Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).
435.3 m / 1,428 ft
Occupied
Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest occupied floor within the building.
345.5 m / 1,134 ft
Floors Above Ground
The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

84

Floors Below Ground
The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

1

# of Apartments
Number of Apartments refers to the total number of residential units (including both rental units and condominiums) contained within a particular building.

58

# of Elevators
Number of Elevators refers to the total number of elevator cars (not shafts) contained within a particular building (including public, private and freight elevators).

2

Top Elevator Speed
Top Elevator Speed refers to the top speed capable of being achieved by an elevator within a particular building, measured in meters per second.

7.1 m/s

Tower GFA
Tower GFA refers to the total gross floor area within the tower footprint, not including adjoining podiums, connected buildings or other towers within the development.

29,357 m² / 315,996 ft²

Construction Schedule
2012

Proposed

2015

Construction Start

2021

Completed

Architect
Design

Usually involved in the front end design, with a "typical" condition being that of a leadership role through either Schematic Design or Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Structural Engineer
Design

The Design Engineer is usually involved in the front end design, typically taking the leadership role in the Schematic Design and Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

MEP Engineer
Design

The Design Engineer is usually involved in the front end design, typically taking the leadership role in the Schematic Design and Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Other Consultant

Other Consultant refers to other organizations which provided significant consultation services for a building project (e.g. wind consultants, environmental consultants, fire and life safety consultants, etc).

Damping
Façade

These are firms that consult on the design of a building's façade. May often be referred to as "Cladding," "Envelope," "Exterior Wall," or "Curtain Wall" Consultant, however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Façade Consultant" exclusively.

Vertical Transportation
Wind
Material Supplier

Material Supplier refers to organizations which supplied significant systems/materials for a building project (e.g. elevator suppliers, facade suppliers, etc).

Cladding
Owner/Developer
JDS Development Group; Property Markets Group; Spruce Capital Partners
Architect
Design

Usually involved in the front end design, with a "typical" condition being that of a leadership role through either Schematic Design or Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Structural Engineer
Design

The Design Engineer is usually involved in the front end design, typically taking the leadership role in the Schematic Design and Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

MEP Engineer
Design

The Design Engineer is usually involved in the front end design, typically taking the leadership role in the Schematic Design and Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Contractor
Main Contractor

The main contractor is the supervisory contractor of all construction work on a project, management of sub-contractors and vendors, etc. May be referred to as "Construction Manager," however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Main Contractor" exclusively.

JDS Construction Group
Other Consultant

Other Consultant refers to other organizations which provided significant consultation services for a building project (e.g. wind consultants, environmental consultants, fire and life safety consultants, etc).

Civil
AKRF
Damping
Façade

These are firms that consult on the design of a building's façade. May often be referred to as "Cladding," "Envelope," "Exterior Wall," or "Curtain Wall" Consultant, however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Façade Consultant" exclusively.

Interiors
Studio Sofield
Lighting
L’Observatoire International
Preservation
Jan Hird Pokorny Associates, Inc.
Vertical Transportation
Wind
Material Supplier

Material Supplier refers to organizations which supplied significant systems/materials for a building project (e.g. elevator suppliers, facade suppliers, etc).

Cladding
Crane
Potain; U.S. Crane & Rigging LLC

CTBUH Initiatives

CTBUH Study Examines Tallest Buildings with Dampers

22 August 2018 - CTBUH Research

Top Company Rankings: The World’s 100 Tallest Buildings

13 October 2016 - CTBUH Research

Videos

22 October 2018 | New York City

Beauty and Finance: Post Mannerism in Skyscraper Design

Building design and devlopment started with small scale conceptual research projects where inspiration and effectiveness, art and technology, and beauty and finance not only co-existed,...

Research

17 October 2016

Singularly Slender: Sky Living in New York, Hong Kong, and Elsewhere

Carol Willis, The Skyscraper Museum

This paper highlights a new 21st-century skyscraper typology – the very tall and slender residential tower – and analyzes the economic, engineering, and urbanistic forces...

Global News

30 July 2020

CTBUH In The Media: The Future of Skyscrapers: A Mile High, Slimmer Than Ever and Made from Wood

History does not want for dizzying fantasies of tall buildings. From the Tower of Babel onwards, humanity has dreamed of ever-more wondrous skyscrapers, whether we...

About 111 West 57th Street

In a bold move blending thoughtful design with urban sensitivity, 111 West 57th Street typifies the luxurious extreme of the superslim typology in New York City. Containing only 60 units, the tower will offer an exclusive, centered perspective on Manhattan’s Midtown neighborhood, affording uninhibited views of the entire urban region.

The tower’s form is derived through an unconventional interpretation of what is possible when working with the requirements of the Midtown zoning envelope, multiplying the height of each setback to present a feathered, rather than a stepped, profile. New ways were also explored to exploit the possibilities of terra-cotta, one of the most flexible and beautiful materials from the golden age of the Manhattan skyscraper. Blocks will be extruded and glazed, then stacked into undulating “pilasters” on the east and west façades, their staggered waves combining into a subtle and distinctive moiré pattern. Each pilaster ascends to one of the stepped setbacks above, so the tower appears to dematerialize as it rises. Alternating between them are vertical bands of glazing trimmed with bronze. To the north and south, views of the city and nearby Central Park are maximized through the use of taught, cleanly detailed glass walls. The footprint of the building was kept as compact as possible, positioning it well back from the street to respect and preserve the landmark Steinway Building at its base.

The result is one-of-a-kind superslim: an exercise in sensitive urbanism, the creative use of technology, and a pride of place that could only be found in Manhattan. Topping out at over 435 meters, when completed it will be among the tallest towers in the city, and one of the most slender skyscrapers in the world.

22 October 2018 | New York City

Beauty and Finance: Post Mannerism in Skyscraper Design

Building design and devlopment started with small scale conceptual research projects where inspiration and effectiveness, art and technology, and beauty and finance not only co-existed,...

20 October 2016 | New York City

Singularly Slender: Sky Living in New York, Hong Kong, and Elsewhere

Thursday October 20, 2016. Hong Kong, China. Carol Willis of The Skyscraper Museum in New York City presents at the 2016 China Conference Plenary 7:...

26 October 2015 | New York City

The New Supers: Super-Slender Towers of New York

432 Park Avenue, the MoMA Tower and Steinway Tower at 111 West 57th Street are the first of a new generation of supertall buildings in...

17 October 2016

Singularly Slender: Sky Living in New York, Hong Kong, and Elsewhere

Carol Willis, The Skyscraper Museum

This paper highlights a new 21st-century skyscraper typology – the very tall and slender residential tower – and analyzes the economic, engineering, and urbanistic forces...

26 October 2015

Apartments in Skyscrapers: Innovations and Perspectives of their Typology Development

Elena Generalova & Viktor Generalov, Samara State University of Architecture and Civil Engineering

The paper proposes to reflect on the questions: what does the typology of apartments in contemporary high-rise construction mean and whether it is consistent with...

26 October 2015

Debating Tall: Luxury Superslims: Bane or Boon?

Michael Stern, JDS Development Group; Mary Rowe, Municipal Art Society of New York

The recent prevalence of extra-thin and tall “superslim” towers in New York, which mostly contain luxury apartments, has been controversial. We felt it was time...

26 October 2015

The Logic of Luxury 2.0

Carol Willis, The Skyscraper Museum

This paper recaps the “what and why” of the super-slender type and gives an abbreviated illustration of the mechanics of the “logic of luxury.” The...

26 October 2015

The New Supers: Super-Slender Towers of New York

Silvian Marcus, WSP Group

432 Park Avenue, the MoMA Tower and Steinway Tower at 111 West 57th Street are the first of a new generation of supertall buildings in...

22 October 2015

New York: The Ultimate Skyscraper Laboratory

CTBUH Research

A timeline of skyscraper completions in New York uncannily resembles the boom and bust cycles of the United States in the 20th and early 21st...

22 October 2015

Perspectives on the Skyscraper City

New York 2015 Conference Special

To commemorate the CTBUH 2015 International Conference, some of the most prominent voices in the New York tall building industry today – all of whom...

14 September 2014

Towards Sustainable Vertical Urbanism

Daniel Safarik, CTBUH

The survival of humanity on this planet relies on a radical repositioning of our cities. In the face of unprecedented global population growth, urbanization, pollution...

22 August 2018

CTBUH Study Examines Tallest Buildings with Dampers

CTBUH has released a Tall Buildings in Numbers (TBIN) interactive data study on the world's tallest buildings with dampers.

13 October 2016

The Council is pleased to announce the Top Company Rankings for numerous disciplines as derived from the list of projects appearing in 100 of the World’s Tallest Buildings.

27 August 2015

Skin NY

CTBUH New York, in association with the New York Young Professionals Committee hosted an event entitled Skin:NY that focused on high-rise façade design and construction

30 July 2015

The Current State of Slender Buildings in NYC

SHoP Architects welcomed a group of architects and engineers for a lively discussion and exchange of ideas about slender buildings.

1 October 2013

New York’s New Delirium

At least five once-in-a-lifetime multi-acre projects are underway in New York. CTBUH Editor Daniel Safarik reports on his journey to investigate further.