J.W. Marriott and The Upper House
Hong Kong
Height

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

1
To Tip:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).

164.5 m / 540 ft
2
Architectural:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

164.5 m / 540 ft
1 2 J.W. Marriott and The Upper House Outline
Floors

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

50
Height 164.5 m / 540 ft
Floors 50
Official Name

The current legal building name.

J.W. Marriott and The Upper House
Name of Complex

A complex is a group of buildings which are designed and built as pieces of a greater development.

Type

CTBUH collects data on two major types of tall structures: 'Buildings' and 'Telecommunications / Observation Towers.' A 'Building' is a structure where at least 50% of the height is occupied by usable floor area. A 'Telecommunications / Observation Tower' is a structure where less than 50% of the structure's height is occupied by usable floor area. Only 'Buildings' are eligible for the CTBUH 'Tallest Buildings' lists.

Building
Status
Completed
Architecturally Topped Out
Structurally Topped Out
Under Construction
Proposed
On Hold
Never Completed
Vision
Competition Entry
Canceled
Proposed Renovation
Under Renovation
Renovated
Under Demolition
Demolished
Completed, 1988
Country

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of Country, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

City

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of City, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

Function

A single-function tall building is defined as one where 85% or more of its usable floor area is dedicated to a single usage. Thus a building with 90% office floor area would be said to be an "office" building, irrespective of other minor functions it may also contain.

A mixed-use tall building contains two or more functions (or uses), where each of the functions occupy a significant proportion of the tower's total space. Support areas such as car parks and mechanical plant space do not constitute mixed-use functions. Functions are denoted on CTBUH "Tallest Building" lists in descending order, e.g., "hotel/office" indicates hotel function above office function.

hotel
Height

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

Architectural
164.5 m / 540 ft
To Tip
164.5 m / 540 ft
Floors Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

50
# of Hotel Rooms

Number of Hotel Rooms refers to the total number of hotel rooms contained within a particular building.

719
Rankings
#
142
Tallest Hotel Building in the World
#
89
Tallest Hotel Building in Asia
#
69
Tallest Hotel Building in China
#
5
Tallest Hotel Building in Hong Kong
Construction Schedule
1985

Construction Start

1988

Completed

2009

Retrofit End

Owner/Developer
Architect
Wong & Ouyang
Structural Engineer
Contractor

Research

17 October 2016

Tim Balckburn, Swire Properties

In the age of the multi-million inhabitant city, the traditional concept of a single Central Business District (CBD) is becoming increasingly unrealistic. As we are...

About J.W. Marriott and The Upper House

Constructed at the base of a hill sloping upward from Victoria Harbour, the Pacific Place Complex sits adjacent to Hong Kong Park, both of which were constructed on the site of the Victoria Barracks operated by the British Military. While the western portion of the barracks became public a green space interspersed with a collection of preserved low-rise structures from Hong Kong’s colonial era, the eastern portion gave way to the Pacific Place development. After the land was transferred from the Government of Hong Kong in the mid 1980’s, construction began quickly with Phase 1 opening in 1988.

Phase 1 included One Pacific Place as the as the J.W. Marriott and The Upper House which was originally constructed as a mixed use residential and hotel tower with 140 serviced apartments above 607 hotel rooms. As part of a later interior retrofit, the uppermost floors were converted from residential into the suites of the 117 key Upper House Hotel which opened in 2009. Combined with the JW Marriott hotel below, there are presently 719 rooms as well as a handful of restaurants spread throughout the tower.

The tower is perched on a hillside podium comprised of the three story Pacific Place shopping mall and a landscaped rooftop serving a courtyard between the towers of the complex as well as the publicly accessible street linking the main entrances of each building. The J.W. Marriott and The Upper House features a glass façade composed of triangular window bays maximizing views of the surrounding harbour, hilltops and skyline which has grown up around it since completion.

17 October 2016

Tim Balckburn, Swire Properties

In the age of the multi-million inhabitant city, the traditional concept of a single Central Business District (CBD) is becoming increasingly unrealistic. As we are...