83
Global
Height rank
Mercury City Tower
Moscow
Height

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

1
To Tip:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).

338.8 m / 1,112 ft
2
Architectural:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

338.8 m / 1,112 ft
3
Occupied:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest occupied floor within the building.

293 m / 961 ft
Floors

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

75
Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

5
1 2 3 Mercury City Tower Outline
Height 338.82 m / 1,112 ft
Floors 75
Official Name

The current legal building name.

Mercury City Tower
Type

CTBUH collects data on two major types of tall structures: 'Buildings' and 'Telecommunications / Observation Towers.' A 'Building' is a structure where at least 50% of the height is occupied by usable floor area. A 'Telecommunications / Observation Tower' is a structure where less than 50% of the structure's height is occupied by usable floor area. Only 'Buildings' are eligible for the CTBUH 'Tallest Buildings' lists.

Building
Status
Completed
Architecturally Topped Out
Structurally Topped Out
Under Construction
Proposed
On Hold
Never Completed
Vision
Competition Entry
Canceled
Proposed Renovation
Under Renovation
Renovated
Under Demolition
Demolished
Completed, 2013
Country

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of Country, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

City

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of City, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

Postal Code
123317
Function

A single-function tall building is defined as one where 85% or more of its usable floor area is dedicated to a single usage. Thus a building with 90% office floor area would be said to be an "office" building, irrespective of other minor functions it may also contain.

A mixed-use tall building contains two or more functions (or uses), where each of the functions occupy a significant proportion of the tower's total space. Support areas such as car parks and mechanical plant space do not constitute mixed-use functions. Functions are denoted on CTBUH "Tallest Building" lists in descending order, e.g., "hotel/office" indicates hotel function above office function.

residential / office
Structural Material

Steel
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from steel. Note that a building of steel construction with a floor system of concrete planks or concrete slab on top of steel beams is still considered a “steel” structure as the concrete elements are not acting as the primary structure.

Reinforced Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from concrete which has been cast in place and utilizes steel reinforcement bars.

Precast Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning system are constructed from steel reinforced concrete which has been precast as individual components and assembled together on-site.

Mixed-Structure
Utilizes distinct systems (e.g. steel, concrete, timber), one on top of the other. For example, a steel/concrete indicates a steel structural system located on top of a concrete structural system, with the opposite true of concrete/steel.

Composite
A combination of materials (e.g. steel, concrete, timber) are used together in the main structural elements. Examples include buildings which utilize: steel columns with a floor system of reinforced concrete beams; a steel frame system with a concrete core; concrete-encased steel columns; concrete-filled steel tubes; etc. Where known, the CTBUH database breaks out the materials used in a composite building’s core, columns, and floor spanning separately.

concrete
Official Website
Height

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

Architectural
338.82 m / 1,112 ft
To Tip
338.82 m / 1,112 ft
Occupied
293.04 m / 961 ft
Floors Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

75
Floors Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

5
# of Apartments

Number of Apartments refers to the total number of residential units (including both rental units and condominiums) contained within a particular building.

137
# of Parking Spaces

Number of Parking Spaces refers to the total number of car parking spaces contained within a particular building.

437
# of Elevators

Number of Elevators refers to the total number of elevator cars (not shafts) contained within a particular building (including public, private and freight elevators).

31
Tower GFA

Tower GFA refers to the total gross floor area within the tower footprint, not including adjoining podiums, connected buildings or other towers within the development.

173,960 m² / 1,872,490 ft²
Rankings
#
83
Tallest in the World
#
5
Tallest in Europe
#
5
Tallest in Russia
#
4
Tallest in Moscow
#
41
Tallest Mixed-use Building in the World
#
3
Tallest Mixed-use Building in Europe
#
3
Tallest Mixed-use Building in Russia
#
3
Tallest Mixed-use Building in Moscow
#
24
Tallest Concrete Building in the World
#
4
Tallest Concrete Building in Europe
#
4
Tallest Concrete Building in Russia
#
4
Tallest Concrete Building in Moscow
Construction Schedule
2006

Proposed

2006

Construction Start

2013

Completed

Owner
Mercury City Tower
Developer
Liedel Investments Limited; Mercury Development
Architect
Frank Williams & Associates; M.M.Posokhin
Gennadiy Sirota; International High-Rise Construction Centre LLC
Structural Engineer
Rosenwasser/Grossman Consulting Engineers P.C.
International High-Rise Construction Centre LLC
MEP Engineer
International High-Rise Construction Centre LLC
HSG Zander
Contractor
HSG Zander; Rasen Construction Co. Inc.; Waterman Group

Building Monitoring

SODIS LAB

Façade Maintenance

Entek Engineering Ltd.

Landscape

M. Paul Friedberg and Partners

Marketing

Wordsearch

Vertical Transportation

Wind

Aluminium

Cladding

Elevator

Façade Maintenance Equipment

CTBUH Initiatives

Research

31 December 2014

Daniel Safarik, Antony Wood, Marty Carver & Marshall Gerometta, CTBUH

An All-Time Record 97 Buildings of 200 Meters or Higher Completed in 2014 and 2014 showed further shifts towards Asia, and also surprising developments in...

About Mercury City Tower

Mercury City Tower is located in Moscow’s bustling International Business Center, a collection of high-rises similar in nature to London’s Canary Wharf and Paris’ La Defense, though it is intended to be much larger in scale. The tower’s distinctive shape allows it to stand out in a busy skyline, but more than its shape, its blazing copper-colored cladding is what makes it unique. The building was originally designed to be surfaced in reflective silver glass in order to mirror the buildings surrounding it, but eventually came to be wrapped in equally reflective bronze-tinted glass. Thanks to its inimitable façade, the tower exhibits a constant glow that makes it appear as though it is continually immersed in the light of the sun on the horizon.

Along with its cladding, Mercury City Tower is memorable for its setback design. The building steps back twice along its northwestern façade, creating a tapering effect that augments the buildings height in tandem with the vertical striping that defines its corners. Each setback has a slanted roof that reinforces the illusion of added height. Though the tower is visually distinct, its façade lacks unnecessary adornments. Rather, the structure and its cladding act together to create a purposeful, clean design. In this way, the building falls squarely into the Structural Expressionist style of architecture.

Located along the topmost floors, the building’s apartments are designed with the flexibility to merge units together, adding to the tower’s overall space efficiency. The building also features a smart “energy cycle” system that regulates energy usage, ambient temperatures, and hot water distribution throughout the development. Although the design of Mercury City is in no way traditional, the typical three-part massing of the volume, comprising a base, core, and crown, imparts the Russian imperatives of strength, reliability, and stability.

31 December 2014

Daniel Safarik, Antony Wood, Marty Carver & Marshall Gerometta, CTBUH

An All-Time Record 97 Buildings of 200 Meters or Higher Completed in 2014 and 2014 showed further shifts towards Asia, and also surprising developments in...

31 December 2013

Daniel Safarik, Antony Wood, Marty Carver & Marshall Gerometta, CTBUH

By all appearances, the small increase in the total number of tall-building completions from 2012 into 2013 is indicative of a return to the prevalent...

01 June 2013

CTBUH Research

There are currently 109 skyscrapers over 150 meters in Europe. This number is set to jump to 161 by the end of 2015, meaning that...

13 October 2016

The Council is pleased to announce the Top Company Rankings for numerous disciplines as derived from the list of projects appearing in 100 of the World’s Tallest Buildings.

31 December 2014

An All-Time Record 97 Buildings of 200 Meters or Higher Completed in 2014 and 2014 showed further shifts towards Asia, and also surprising developments in building functions and structural materials.

31 December 2013

By all appearances, the small increase in the total number of tall-building completions from 2012 into 2013 is indicative of a return to the prevalent trend of increasing completions each year over the past decade.

1 June 2013

There are currently 109 skyscrapers over 150 meters in Europe. This number is set to jump to 161 by the end of 2015, meaning that there are more than 50 projects in advanced stages of construction.