Museum of The Future

Dubai

Note: As this project is architecturally topped out, the data is based on the most reliable information currently available. This data is thus subject to change until the building has completed and all information can be confirmed and ratified by the CTBUH.

Height 77.8 m / 255 ft
Floors 9
Official Name
The current legal building name.

Museum of The Future

Type
CTBUH collects data on two major types of tall structures: 'Buildings' and 'Telecommunications / Observation Towers.' A 'Building' is a structure where at least 50% of the height is occupied by usable floor area. A 'Telecommunications / Observation Tower' is a structure where less than 50% of the structure's height is occupied by usable floor area. Only 'Buildings' are eligible for the CTBUH 'Tallest Buildings' lists.

Building

Status
Completed
Architecturally Topped Out
Structurally Topped Out
Under Construction
Proposed
On Hold
Never Completed
Vision
Competition Entry
Canceled
Proposed Renovation
Under Renovation
Renovated
Under Demolition
Demolished

Architecturally Topped Out

Expected Completion

2021

Country
The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of Country, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

United Arab Emirates

City
The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of City, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

Dubai

Function
A single-function tall building is defined as one where 85% or more of its usable floor area is dedicated to a single usage. Thus a building with 90% office floor area would be said to be an "office" building, irrespective of other minor functions it may also contain.

A mixed-use tall building contains two or more functions (or uses), where each of the functions occupy a significant proportion of the tower's total space. Support areas such as car parks and mechanical plant space do not constitute mixed-use functions. Functions are denoted on CTBUH "Tallest Building" lists in descending order, e.g., "hotel/office" indicates hotel function above office function.

museum / retail

Structural Material
Steel
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from steel. Note that a building of steel construction with a floor system of concrete planks or concrete slab on top of steel beams is still considered a “steel” structure as the concrete elements are not acting as the primary structure.

Reinforced Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from concrete which has been cast in place and utilizes steel reinforcement bars.

Precast Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning system are constructed from steel reinforced concrete which has been precast as individual components and assembled together on-site.

Mixed-Structure
Utilizes distinct systems (e.g. steel, concrete, timber), one on top of the other. For example, a steel/concrete indicates a steel structural system located on top of a concrete structural system, with the opposite true of concrete/steel.

Composite
A combination of materials (e.g. steel, concrete, timber) are used together in the main structural elements. Examples include buildings which utilize: steel columns with a floor system of reinforced concrete beams; a steel frame system with a concrete core; concrete-encased steel columns; concrete-filled steel tubes; etc. Where known, the CTBUH database breaks out the materials used in a composite building’s core, columns, and floor spanning separately.

steel/concrete

Energy Label

LEED Platinum

Height
Architectural
Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

77.8 m / 255 ft

To Tip
Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).
77.8 m / 255 ft
Occupied
Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest occupied floor within the building.
64.7 m / 212 ft
Floors Above Ground
The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

9

Floors Below Ground
The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

1

# of Elevators
Number of Elevators refers to the total number of elevator cars (not shafts) contained within a particular building (including public, private and freight elevators).

10

Tower GFA
Tower GFA refers to the total gross floor area within the tower footprint, not including adjoining podiums, connected buildings or other towers within the development.

17,000 m² / 182,986 ft²

Construction Schedule
2015

Proposed

2017

Construction Start

2021

Completed

Architect
Design

Usually involved in the front end design, with a "typical" condition being that of a leadership role through either Schematic Design or Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Structural Engineer
Design

The Design Engineer is usually involved in the front end design, typically taking the leadership role in the Schematic Design and Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

MEP Engineer
Design

The Design Engineer is usually involved in the front end design, typically taking the leadership role in the Schematic Design and Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Other Consultant

Other Consultant refers to other organizations which provided significant consultation services for a building project (e.g. wind consultants, environmental consultants, fire and life safety consultants, etc).

Façade

These are firms that consult on the design of a building's façade. May often be referred to as "Cladding," "Envelope," "Exterior Wall," or "Curtain Wall" Consultant, however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Façade Consultant" exclusively.

Owner
Dubai Future Foundation
Developer
Meraas Development
Architect
Design

Usually involved in the front end design, with a "typical" condition being that of a leadership role through either Schematic Design or Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Structural Engineer
Design

The Design Engineer is usually involved in the front end design, typically taking the leadership role in the Schematic Design and Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

MEP Engineer
Design

The Design Engineer is usually involved in the front end design, typically taking the leadership role in the Schematic Design and Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Contractor
Main Contractor

The main contractor is the supervisory contractor of all construction work on a project, management of sub-contractors and vendors, etc. May be referred to as "Construction Manager," however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Main Contractor" exclusively.

BAM International
Other Consultant

Other Consultant refers to other organizations which provided significant consultation services for a building project (e.g. wind consultants, environmental consultants, fire and life safety consultants, etc).

Façade

These are firms that consult on the design of a building's façade. May often be referred to as "Cladding," "Envelope," "Exterior Wall," or "Curtain Wall" Consultant, however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Façade Consultant" exclusively.

About Museum of The Future

The primary inspiration of the Museum of The Future was to create a form that represents the client’s vision of the future, where the physical building represents and contains within its exhibition floors, our understanding of the “future” as we know it today and for the next 5 to 10 years. In contrast the ‘void’ represents what we do not yet know, and that the people who seek the unknown will continue to innovate and discover to help guide humanity towards a better future, whereby creating the continuum of replenishing the Museum of The Future.

Occupying a prime location adjacent to the Emirates Towers, the Museum of The Future is a expressive and dynamic landmark. The Museum of The Future is comprised of three main parts: the green hill, the building and the void.

The green hill represents the earth, with solidity, permanence, and rootedness in place, time and history. This is done through the smooth transition from the site in the form of an earthen, vegetated mound with minimal visible built intervention. The inspiration for the green hill was also to elevate the building in a calm and unobtrusive way above the metro line and create greenery in elevation that is uncommon in Dubai where visitors can enjoy while engaging with the Museum.
Likewise, the glimmering, futuristic upper building represents mankind, with all of its strength, artistry and ability to create in harmony with its surroundings. This is formed by the bold shape which emerges from the hill, covered with the Arabic calligraphy about the future, and displaying mankind’s passion for the arts and creating.

Lastly, the elliptical void within the upper structure represents innovation. This is done primarily by creating an empty space showing the unwritten future into which humanity, and the world can symbolically look towards. This open and unburdened future is an inspiration which can drive the innovators and creators of today.
The Museum is not only a visual and artistic beacon, but also sets new innovative benchmarks. As a 17,000m2 torus-shaped building clad in stainless steel, achieving LEED Platinum status, and designed holistically through BIM at every design stage, the building represents the future through innovative design principles, implementation and construction. The design is a low carbon civic building achieved through the use of many design innovations which include parametric design, passive solar architecture, low-energy and low-water engineering solutions, recovery strategies for both energy and water, and building integrated renewables.

The building accommodates six exhibition floors and one administration floor above a 3-level podium containing a food and beverage deck, with auditorium, retail, parking and services.

On the whole, the distinctive features of the design will create a timeless landmark that will be a shining example for all future low carbon buildings in the United Arab Emirates.

As an institution dedicated to design and innovation, the Museum of The Future is a destination for the best and brightest inventors and entrepreneurs, offering an integrated environment empowering creative minds to test, fund and market ideas for futuristic prototypes and services. It brings together inventors, designers and researchers, presenting a range of technologies, becoming an incubator for ideas and designs, a driver for innovation, and a global destination for inventors and entrepreneurs.