Newton Suites
Singapore
Height

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

1
To Tip:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).

120 m / 394 ft
2
Architectural:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

120 m / 394 ft
1 2 Newton Suites Outline
Floors

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

36
Height 120 m / 394 ft
Floors 36
Official Name

The current legal building name.

Newton Suites
Type

CTBUH collects data on two major types of tall structures: 'Buildings' and 'Telecommunications / Observation Towers.' A 'Building' is a structure where at least 50% of the height is occupied by usable floor area. A 'Telecommunications / Observation Tower' is a structure where less than 50% of the structure's height is occupied by usable floor area. Only 'Buildings' are eligible for the CTBUH 'Tallest Buildings' lists.

Building
Status
Completed
Architecturally Topped Out
Structurally Topped Out
Under Construction
Proposed
On Hold
Never Completed
Vision
Competition Entry
Canceled
Proposed Renovation
Under Renovation
Renovated
Under Demolition
Demolished
Completed, 2007
Country

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of Country, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

City

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of City, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

Address
Postal Code
307994
Function

A single-function tall building is defined as one where 85% or more of its usable floor area is dedicated to a single usage. Thus a building with 90% office floor area would be said to be an "office" building, irrespective of other minor functions it may also contain.

A mixed-use tall building contains two or more functions (or uses), where each of the functions occupy a significant proportion of the tower's total space. Support areas such as car parks and mechanical plant space do not constitute mixed-use functions. Functions are denoted on CTBUH "Tallest Building" lists in descending order, e.g., "hotel/office" indicates hotel function above office function.

residential
Structural Material

Steel
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from steel. Note that a building of steel construction with a floor system of concrete planks or concrete slab on top of steel beams is still considered a “steel” structure as the concrete elements are not acting as the primary structure.

Reinforced Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from concrete which has been cast in place and utilizes steel reinforcement bars.

Precast Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning system are constructed from steel reinforced concrete which has been precast as individual components and assembled together on-site.

Mixed-Structure
Utilizes distinct systems (e.g. steel, concrete, timber), one on top of the other. For example, a steel/concrete indicates a steel structural system located on top of a concrete structural system, with the opposite true of concrete/steel.

Composite
A combination of materials (e.g. steel, concrete, timber) are used together in the main structural elements. Examples include buildings which utilize: steel columns with a floor system of reinforced concrete beams; a steel frame system with a concrete core; concrete-encased steel columns; concrete-filled steel tubes; etc. Where known, the CTBUH database breaks out the materials used in a composite building’s core, columns, and floor spanning separately.

concrete
Height

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

Architectural
120 m / 394 ft
To Tip
120 m / 394 ft
Floors Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

36
# of Apartments

Number of Apartments refers to the total number of residential units (including both rental units and condominiums) contained within a particular building.

118
Tower GFA

Tower GFA refers to the total gross floor area within the tower footprint, not including adjoining podiums, connected buildings or other towers within the development.

11,835 m² / 127,391 ft²
Construction Schedule
2004

Construction Start

2007

Completed

Owner/Developer
UOL Group Ltd
Architect
Structural Engineer
LBW Consultants
MEP Engineer
Contractor
Kajima Corporation

CTBUH Initiatives

Singapore Visit


12 August 2009 - Building Tour

Singapore Visit, August 2009


1 August 2009 - Building Tour

Videos

17 October 2016 | Singapore

Monday, October 17, 2016. Shenzhen, China. long Xiu, Chairman, Architectural Society of China; Mun Summ Wong, Woha; Antony Wood, Executive Director, CTBUH answer questions at...

Research

16 September 2014

CTBUH Research

The latest CTBUH technical guide, Green Walls in High-Rise Buildings, provides a thorough investigation of the methods used around the world for implementation of vertical...

About Newton Suites

Newton Suites is a study in environmental solutions to tropical high-rise living. The design integrates several sustainable devices into a contemporary architectural composition, creating a sustainable, contemporary addition to the city skyline. The building sits at the edge of a high-rise zone and fronts a height-controlled area that affords expansive views of the central nature reserves; a rare luxury in densely built Singapore.

The exterior of the tower uses sun shading elements, patterned planes of textured panels and protruding balconies to create a façade that is functional yet expressive. The horizontal, metal expanded mesh sun shading screens the strong tropical sunlight. The angled mesh reduces solar radiation while permitting visual connection to the ground. The angled expanded mesh changes appearance with viewpoint, appearing anywhere between solid and transparent. This, combined with the cast shadows and interference patterns between the shadows and the mesh, gives the building a constantly shifting, blurred appearance depending on angle and time of day. The layers of sun shades also change the reading of the projections of the bay windows, a standard feature of Singapore apartments due to their contribution to developer profit and prescriptive regulations, embedding them in the language of the building.

Landscape is used as a material—rooftop planting, sky gardens and green walls are incorporated into the design. Creeper screens are applied to otherwise blank walls to create visual delight, absorb sunlight and carbon and create oxygen in the dense urban environment. Most available horizontal and vertical surfaces are landscaped; creating an area of landscaping that is 130% (110% planted) of the total site. Trees cover the car park, project from the sky gardens at every four levels and crown the building at the penthouse roof decks. The above-ground car park uses far less energy than an underground car park and is fully enclosed with creepers, absorbing exhaust emissions. The car park roof houses a substantial clubhouse with gym, steam room, party areas and 25-meter (82-foot) swimming pool with a glass overflow edge.

17 October 2016 | Singapore

Monday, October 17, 2016. Shenzhen, China. long Xiu, Chairman, Architectural Society of China; Mun Summ Wong, Woha; Antony Wood, Executive Director, CTBUH answer questions at...

18 September 2014 | Singapore

Asia’s rapidly growing metropolises demand an alternative strategy for city planning and architecture that addresses the need to live appropriately and sustainability with our tropical...

23 October 2009 | Singapore

As many projects struggle to justify the economic implications of ‘going green’ in the eyes of many developers, still others seem loaded with sustainable technologies...

16 September 2014

CTBUH Research

The latest CTBUH technical guide, Green Walls in High-Rise Buildings, provides a thorough investigation of the methods used around the world for implementation of vertical...

01 August 2009

Mun Summ Wong & Richard Hassell, WOHA

High-rise, high-density living has been embraced as a positive accommodation solution for many millions of people living in Asia's growing urban metropolis. This paper outlines...

01 August 2009

Mun Summ Wong & Richard Hassell, WOHA

High-rise, high-density living has been embraced as a positive accommodation solution for many millions of people living in Asia's growing urban metropolis. This paper outlines...

14 August 2009

Singapore Visit

Executive Director Antony Wood shares his recent experiences of a new and exciting Singapore which has, in a quiet, unpretentious way, been implementing social-urban policies.

1 August 2009

Singapore Visit, August 2009

CTBUH Executive Director Antony Wood shares his recent experiences of a new and exciting Singapore.