26
Global
Height rank
One Vanderbilt
New York City
Height
1
To Tip:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).

427 m / 1,401 ft
2
Architectural:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

427 m / 1,401 ft
3
Occupied:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest occupied floor within the building.

312 m / 1,024 ft
1 2 3 One Vanderbilt Outline
Floors
Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

59
Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

4
Height 427 m / 1400.9 ft
Floors 59
Official Name

The current legal building name.

One Vanderbilt
Other Names

Other names the building has commonly been known as, including former names, common informal names, local names, etc.

One Vanderbilt Place
Type

CTBUH collects data on two major types of tall structures: 'Buildings' and 'Telecommunications / Observation Towers.' A 'Building' is a structure where at least 50% of the height is occupied by usable floor area. A 'Telecommunications / Observation Tower' is a structure where less than 50% of the structure's height is occupied by usable floor area. Only 'Buildings' are eligible for the CTBUH 'Tallest Buildings' lists.

Building
Status
Completed
Architecturally Topped Out
Structurally Topped Out
Under Construction
Proposed
On Hold
Never Completed
Vision
Competition Entry
Canceled
Proposed Renovation
Under Renovation
Renovated
Under Demolition
Demolished
Completed, 2020
Country

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of Country, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

City

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of City, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

Function

A single-function tall building is defined as one where 85% or more of its usable floor area is dedicated to a single usage. Thus a building with 90% office floor area would be said to be an "office" building, irrespective of other minor functions it may also contain.

A mixed-use tall building contains two or more functions (or uses), where each of the functions occupy a significant proportion of the tower's total space. Support areas such as car parks and mechanical plant space do not constitute mixed-use functions. Functions are denoted on CTBUH "Tallest Building" lists in descending order, e.g., "hotel/office" indicates hotel function above office function.

office
Structural Material

Steel
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from steel. Note that a building of steel construction with a floor system of concrete planks or concrete slab on top of steel beams is still considered a “steel” structure as the concrete elements are not acting as the primary structure.

Reinforced Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from concrete which has been cast in place and utilizes steel reinforcement bars.

Precast Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning system are constructed from steel reinforced concrete which has been precast as individual components and assembled together on-site.

Mixed-Structure
Utilizes distinct systems (e.g. steel, concrete, timber), one on top of the other. For example, a steel/concrete indicates a steel structural system located on top of a concrete structural system, with the opposite true of concrete/steel.

Composite
A combination of materials (e.g. steel, concrete, timber) are used together in the main structural elements. Examples include buildings which utilize: steel columns with a floor system of reinforced concrete beams; a steel frame system with a concrete core; concrete-encased steel columns; concrete-filled steel tubes; etc. Where known, the CTBUH database breaks out the materials used in a composite building’s core, columns, and floor spanning separately.

composite
Core
Reinforced Concrete
Columns
Steel
Floor Spanning
Steel
Energy Label
LEED Gold
Official Website
Architectural

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

427 m / 1400.9 ft
To Tip

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).

427 m / 1400.9 ft
Occupied

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest occupied floor within the building.

312 m / 1023.6 ft
Observatory
312 m / 1023.6 ft
Floors Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

59
Floors Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

4
# of Elevators

Number of Elevators refers to the total number of elevator cars (not shafts) contained within a particular building (including public, private and freight elevators).

42
Tower GFA

Tower GFA refers to the total gross floor area within the tower footprint, not including adjoining podiums, connected buildings or other towers within the development.

162,600 m² / 1,750,212 ft²
Rankings
#
26
Tallest in the World
#
4
Tallest in North America
#
4
Tallest in United States
#
3
Tallest in New York City
#
10
Tallest Office Building in the World
#
3
Tallest Office Building in North America
#
3
Tallest Office Building in United States
#
2
Tallest Office Building in New York City
#
22
Tallest Composite Building in the World
#
2
Tallest Composite Building in North America
#
2
Tallest Composite Building in United States
#
2
Tallest Composite Building in New York City
Construction Schedule
2013

Proposed

2017

Construction Start

2020

Completed

Owner/Developer
Architect
Design

Usually involved in the front end design, with a "typical" condition being that of a leadership role through either Schematic Design or Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Structural Engineer
Design

The Design Engineer is usually involved in the front end design, typically taking the leadership role in the Schematic Design and Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

MEP Engineer
Design

The Design Engineer is usually involved in the front end design, typically taking the leadership role in the Schematic Design and Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Project Manager

The CTBUH lists a project manager when a specific firm has been commissioned to oversee this aspect of a tall building’s design/construction. When the project management efforts are handled by the developer, main contract, or architect, this field will be omitted.

Contractor
Main Contractor

The main contractor is the supervisory contractor of all construction work on a project, management of sub-contractors and vendors, etc. May be referred to as "Construction Manager," however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Main Contractor" exclusively.

Other Consultant

Other Consultant refers to other organizations which provided significant consultation services for a building project (e.g. wind consultants, environmental consultants, fire and life safety consultants, etc).

Façade

These are firms that consult on the design of a building's façade. May often be referred to as "Cladding," "Envelope," "Exterior Wall," or "Curtain Wall" Consultant, however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Façade Consultant" exclusively.

Geotechnical
Interiors
Land Surveyor
Marketing
Wind
Material Supplier

Material Supplier refers to organizations which supplied significant systems/materials for a building project (e.g. elevator suppliers, facade suppliers, etc).

Elevator
Formwork
Owner/Developer
Architect
Design

Usually involved in the front end design, with a "typical" condition being that of a leadership role through either Schematic Design or Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Structural Engineer
Design

The Design Engineer is usually involved in the front end design, typically taking the leadership role in the Schematic Design and Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

MEP Engineer
Design

The Design Engineer is usually involved in the front end design, typically taking the leadership role in the Schematic Design and Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Project Manager

The CTBUH lists a project manager when a specific firm has been commissioned to oversee this aspect of a tall building’s design/construction. When the project management efforts are handled by the developer, main contract, or architect, this field will be omitted.

Contractor
Main Contractor

The main contractor is the supervisory contractor of all construction work on a project, management of sub-contractors and vendors, etc. May be referred to as "Construction Manager," however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Main Contractor" exclusively.

Other Consultant

Other Consultant refers to other organizations which provided significant consultation services for a building project (e.g. wind consultants, environmental consultants, fire and life safety consultants, etc).

Façade

These are firms that consult on the design of a building's façade. May often be referred to as "Cladding," "Envelope," "Exterior Wall," or "Curtain Wall" Consultant, however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Façade Consultant" exclusively.

Permasteelisa Group; Vidaris, Inc.
Geotechnical
Interiors
Land Surveyor
Marketing
By-Encore; CBRE
Roofing
Vidaris, Inc.
Sustainability
Vidaris, Inc.
Wind
Material Supplier

Material Supplier refers to organizations which supplied significant systems/materials for a building project (e.g. elevator suppliers, facade suppliers, etc).

Cladding
Boston Valley Terracotta
Elevator
Formwork
Steel
Banker Steel Company; ArcelorMittal

CTBUH Initiatives

Talking Tall: Engineering a Better Future


27 July 2018 - CTBUH Publication

CTBUH NYC Organizes One Vanderbilt Site Tour


6 June 2017 - Event

Videos

17 October 2016 | New York City

Monday, October 17, 2016. Shenzhen, China. Richard Witt, Quadrangle Architects; James von Klamperer Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates; Keith Griffiths, Aedas; Peter Brannan, Arquitectonica answer questions...

Research

12 January 2021

CTBUH Research

The Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat has released its annual report, CTBUH Year in Review: Tall Trends of 2020, part of the Tall...

Global News

15 September 2020 | New York City

Yesterday, 14 September 2020, Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates (KPF) and developers SL Green and Hines celebrated the opening of One Vanderbilt with a ribbon cutting...

17 October 2016 | New York City

Monday, October 17, 2016. Shenzhen, China. Richard Witt, Quadrangle Architects; James von Klamperer Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates; Keith Griffiths, Aedas; Peter Brannan, Arquitectonica answer questions...

17 October 2016 | New York City

This presentation outlined X-Information Modeling or XIM, a method of data-driven decision-making for the design of tall buildings. Developed over its application on more than...

26 October 2015 | New York City

This presentation traces the development of One Vanderbilt from early design through the complex city approvals process that is ultimately allowing for its realization. From...

26 October 2015 | New York City

James von Klemperer of KPF is interviewed by Chris Bentley during the 2015 CTBUH New York Conference at the Grand Hyatt New York. James discusses...

18 September 2014 | New York City

September 18, 2014. Shanghai, China. James von Klemperer from Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates PC presents at the 2014 Shanghai Conference closing plenary on "Urban Density...

12 January 2021

CTBUH Research

The Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat has released its annual report, CTBUH Year in Review: Tall Trends of 2020, part of the Tall...

30 January 2020

CTBUH Research

The combined brains of the CTBUH editorial and database staff boldly predict what might happen across the global skyscraper industry in 2020. Check out our...

17 October 2016

James von Klempeter, Luc Wilson & Mondrian Hsieh, Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates

This paper outlines X-Information Modeling or XIM, a method of data-driven decision-making for the design of tall buildings. Developed over its application on more than...

26 October 2015

James von Klemperer, Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates

This paper traces the development of One Vanderbilt from early design through the complex city approvals process that is ultimately allowing for its realization. From...

22 October 2015

CTBUH Research

A timeline of skyscraper completions in New York uncannily resembles the boom and bust cycles of the United States in the 20th and early 21st...

01 June 2015

James von Klemperer, Kohn Pedersen Fox

As the skyscraper matures as a building type, its role in actively connecting to, and reinforcing, major threads of urban fabric becomes increasingly more important....

16 September 2014

James von Klemperer, Kohn Pedersen Fox

As the skyscraper matures as a building type, its role in actively connecting to, and reinforcing, major threads of urban fabric becomes increasingly more important....

15 September 2020 | New York City

Yesterday, 14 September 2020, Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates (KPF) and developers SL Green and Hines celebrated the opening of One Vanderbilt with a ribbon cutting...

17 October 2019 | New York City

Demolition preparation at 270 Park Avenue in Midtown East continues to make headway, and on 14 October 2019, renderings were obtained of Foster + Partners...

18 September 2019 | New York City

The Grand Central Terminal-adjacent supertall One Vanderbilt officially topped out this week, reaching its full 1,401-foot (427-meter) height. Designed by Kohn Pedersen Fox, the tower...

06 May 2019 | New York City

Amidst the ongoing evolution of the Manhattan skyline, one of the most notable recent changes has been the completion of the Midtown East rezoning, which...

05 February 2019 | New York City

One Vanderbilt is officially the latest skyscraper in New York City to achieve a height equivalent to “supertall” (300 meters and higher) status. Located at...

27 July 2018

Talking Tall: Engineering a Better Future

In the 2018 CTBUH Journal Issue III, Aine Brazil, Vice Chairman, Thornton Tomasetti, talks about her career highlights in high-rises and the support for more women in engineering.

6 June 2017

CTBUH NYC Organizes One Vanderbilt Site Tour

CTBUH New York hosted a series of presentations and a tour at the construction site of One Vanderbilt, which will rise to 427 meters when completed in 2021.