195
Global
Height rank

Shum Yip Upperhills Tower 2

Shenzhen
Height
1
To Tip:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).

299.3 m / 982 ft
2
Architectural:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

299.3 m / 982 ft
Floors
Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

62
Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

3
1 2 Shum Yip Upperhills Tower 2 Outline
Height 299.3 m / 982 ft
Floors 62
Official Name
The current legal building name.

Shum Yip Upperhills Tower 2

Name of Complex
A complex is a group of buildings which are designed and built as pieces of a greater development.

Shum Yip Upperhills

Type
CTBUH collects data on two major types of tall structures: 'Buildings' and 'Telecommunications / Observation Towers.' A 'Building' is a structure where at least 50% of the height is occupied by usable floor area. A 'Telecommunications / Observation Tower' is a structure where less than 50% of the structure's height is occupied by usable floor area. Only 'Buildings' are eligible for the CTBUH 'Tallest Buildings' lists.

Building

Status
Completed
Architecturally Topped Out
Structurally Topped Out
Under Construction
Proposed
On Hold
Never Completed
Vision
Competition Entry
Canceled
Proposed Renovation
Under Renovation
Renovated
Under Demolition
Demolished

Completed

Completion

2017

Country
The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of Country, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

China

City
The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of City, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

Shenzhen

Address

Huanggang Road

Function
A single-function tall building is defined as one where 85% or more of its usable floor area is dedicated to a single usage. Thus a building with 90% office floor area would be said to be an "office" building, irrespective of other minor functions it may also contain.

A mixed-use tall building contains two or more functions (or uses), where each of the functions occupy a significant proportion of the tower's total space. Support areas such as car parks and mechanical plant space do not constitute mixed-use functions. Functions are denoted on CTBUH "Tallest Building" lists in descending order, e.g., "hotel/office" indicates hotel function above office function.

office

Structural Material
Steel
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from steel. Note that a building of steel construction with a floor system of concrete planks or concrete slab on top of steel beams is still considered a “steel” structure as the concrete elements are not acting as the primary structure.

Reinforced Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from concrete which has been cast in place and utilizes steel reinforcement bars.

Precast Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning system are constructed from steel reinforced concrete which has been precast as individual components and assembled together on-site.

Mixed-Structure
Utilizes distinct systems (e.g. steel, concrete, timber), one on top of the other. For example, a steel/concrete indicates a steel structural system located on top of a concrete structural system, with the opposite true of concrete/steel.

Composite
A combination of materials (e.g. steel, concrete, timber) are used together in the main structural elements. Examples include buildings which utilize: steel columns with a floor system of reinforced concrete beams; a steel frame system with a concrete core; concrete-encased steel columns; concrete-filled steel tubes; etc. Where known, the CTBUH database breaks out the materials used in a composite building’s core, columns, and floor spanning separately.

composite

Core
Reinforced Concrete
Columns
Concrete Encased Steel
Floor Spanning
Steel
Height
Architectural
Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

299.3 m / 982 ft

To Tip
Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).
299.3 m / 982 ft
Floors Above Ground
The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

62

Floors Below Ground
The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

3

Rankings
#
195
Tallest in the World
#
117
Tallest in Asia
#
98
Tallest in China
#
15
Tallest in Shenzhen
#
74
Tallest Office Building in the World
#
49
Tallest Office Building in Asia
#
44
Tallest Office Building in China
#
9
Tallest Office Building in Shenzhen
#
115
Tallest Composite Building in the World
#
96
Tallest Composite Building in Asia
#
89
Tallest Composite Building in China
#
15
Tallest Composite Building in Shenzhen
Construction Schedule
2011

Proposed

2013

Construction Start

2017

Completed

Architect
Design

Usually involved in the front end design, with a "typical" condition being that of a leadership role through either Schematic Design or Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Structural Engineer
Design

The Design Engineer is usually involved in the front end design, typically taking the leadership role in the Schematic Design and Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

MEP Engineer
Design

The Design Engineer is usually involved in the front end design, typically taking the leadership role in the Schematic Design and Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Contractor
Main Contractor

The main contractor is the supervisory contractor of all construction work on a project, management of sub-contractors and vendors, etc. May be referred to as "Construction Manager," however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Main Contractor" exclusively.

Other Consultant

Other Consultant refers to other organizations which provided significant consultation services for a building project (e.g. wind consultants, environmental consultants, fire and life safety consultants, etc).

Developer
Shum Yip Land Company Limited
Architect
Design

Usually involved in the front end design, with a "typical" condition being that of a leadership role through either Schematic Design or Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Architect of Record

Usually takes on the balance of the architectural effort not executed by the "Design Architect," typically responsible for the construction documents, conforming to local codes, etc. May often be referred to as "Executive," "Associate," or "Local" Architect, however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Architect of Record" exclusively.

SHENZHEN CAPOL INTERNATIONAL AND ASSOCIATES CO., LTD
Structural Engineer
Design

The Design Engineer is usually involved in the front end design, typically taking the leadership role in the Schematic Design and Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

MEP Engineer
Design

The Design Engineer is usually involved in the front end design, typically taking the leadership role in the Schematic Design and Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Contractor
Main Contractor

The main contractor is the supervisory contractor of all construction work on a project, management of sub-contractors and vendors, etc. May be referred to as "Construction Manager," however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Main Contractor" exclusively.

China State Construction Engineering Corporation; China Construction Third Engineering Bureau Co., Ltd.
Other Consultant

Other Consultant refers to other organizations which provided significant consultation services for a building project (e.g. wind consultants, environmental consultants, fire and life safety consultants, etc).

Lighting
Speirs and Major
Traffic
MVA Transportation, Planning & Management Consultants

Videos

18 October 2016 | Shenzhen

CTBUH Video Interview – Yan Meng

Yan Meng of Urbanus is interviewed by Chris Bentley during the 2016 CTBUH China Conference. Yan discusses the design process of the Shum Yip Upperhills...

Research

05 February 2018

2017: Skyscraper History’s Tallest, Highest- Volume, and Most Geographically Diverse Year

This 2017 Tall Building Year in Review / Tall Buildings in Numbers data analysis report shows that more buildings of 200 meters’ height or greater...

About Shum Yip Upperhills Tower 2

Located just north of Shenzhen’s main central business district, Shum Yip Upperhills Tower 2 is the second tallest building within a large complex of six towers and a series of low-rise buildings surrounding an elevated pedestrian space linking two large parks directly to the east and west. Shum Yip Upperhills Tower 2 was from the onset designed as a pair of towers, drawing inspiration through the power of having two buildings rather than one in order to reinforce the landmark status of the highly visible project.

Designed as a columnless building with an entirely flexible interior, Shum Yip Upperhills Tower 2 is framed as a composite structure with a grid of hollow steel box columns making up the perimeter and steel framed floor plates linking it to a reinforced concrete core. This is in contrast to Tower 1, which was also framed as a composite structure with a reinforced concrete core, but instead has a perimeter structure made up of two very large steel super columns on each edge of the tower and steel floorplates strung between them and the interior core.

The façade is made up of custom designed glass modules with individual glass panes spanning 3 meters wide by 3.5 meters high, essentially the dimensions of a single office and about as large as single glass panes could be in a high-rise application at the time of design. This allows for floor to ceiling windows to maximize views while creating the illusion of nothing between the occupants and the outdoors.

The city of Shenzhen put a strong emphasizes on the interaction of the complex with pedestrians due to the location between Beacon Hill and Lotus Hill Parks. The city sought to seize the opportunity to establish a linkage between the green spaces when the complex was proposed for what was once an industrial park. As such, the project creates a direct passage through the block linked by elevated bridges crossing the arterial roads which flank the site to the east and west. The unique public space created ensures Shum Yip Upperhills Tower 2 and the greater complex will be an important part of the local cityscape for years to come.

18 October 2016 | Shenzhen

CTBUH Video Interview – Yan Meng

Yan Meng of Urbanus is interviewed by Chris Bentley during the 2016 CTBUH China Conference. Yan discusses the design process of the Shum Yip Upperhills...

18 October 2016 | Shenzhen

Tall Buildings and Context: Appropriate High Rise Vernaculars

The issue of skyscraper form and expression being appropriate to cultural and social context is currently a hotly debated topic in China, as well as...

17 October 2016 | Shenzhen

CTBUH Video Interview – Jovi Chu

Jovi Chu of Shum Yip Land Company Limited is interviewed by Chris Bentley during the 2016 CTBUH China Conference. Jovi discusses the design process of...

17 October 2016 | Shenzhen

Do We Need 700 Meter High-Rise Buildings?

Through analysis of dense urban high-rise building complexes as well as research on the relationship of those structures to a city's social organization, this presentation...

05 February 2018

2017: Skyscraper History’s Tallest, Highest- Volume, and Most Geographically Diverse Year

This 2017 Tall Building Year in Review / Tall Buildings in Numbers data analysis report shows that more buildings of 200 meters’ height or greater...

17 October 2016

Do We Need 700 Meter High-Rise Buildings?

Jovi Chu, Shum Yip Land Company Limited

Through analysis of dense urban high-rise building complexes as well as research on the relationship of those structures to a city’s social organization, this paper...