The Red Apple

Rotterdam
Height 123.5 m / 405 ft
Floors 38
Official Name
The current legal building name.

The Red Apple

Other Names
Other names the building has commonly been known as, including former names, common informal names, local names, etc.

Punt en Scheepmakersstraat

Type
CTBUH collects data on two major types of tall structures: 'Buildings' and 'Telecommunications / Observation Towers.' A 'Building' is a structure where at least 50% of the height is occupied by usable floor area. A 'Telecommunications / Observation Tower' is a structure where less than 50% of the structure's height is occupied by usable floor area. Only 'Buildings' are eligible for the CTBUH 'Tallest Buildings' lists.

Building

Status
Completed
Architecturally Topped Out
Structurally Topped Out
Under Construction
Proposed
On Hold
Never Completed
Vision
Competition Entry
Canceled
Proposed Renovation
Under Renovation
Renovated
Under Demolition
Demolished

Completed

Completion

2008

Country
The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of Country, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

Netherlands

City
The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of City, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

Rotterdam

Function
A single-function tall building is defined as one where 85% or more of its usable floor area is dedicated to a single usage. Thus a building with 90% office floor area would be said to be an "office" building, irrespective of other minor functions it may also contain.

A mixed-use tall building contains two or more functions (or uses), where each of the functions occupy a significant proportion of the tower's total space. Support areas such as car parks and mechanical plant space do not constitute mixed-use functions. Functions are denoted on CTBUH "Tallest Building" lists in descending order, e.g., "hotel/office" indicates hotel function above office function.

residential

Height
Architectural
Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

123.5 m / 405 ft

To Tip
Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).
123.5 m / 405 ft
Floors Above Ground
The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

38

# of Apartments
Number of Apartments refers to the total number of residential units (including both rental units and condominiums) contained within a particular building.

200

# of Parking Spaces
Number of Parking Spaces refers to the total number of car parking spaces contained within a particular building.

338

# of Elevators
Number of Elevators refers to the total number of elevator cars (not shafts) contained within a particular building (including public, private and freight elevators).

6

Construction Schedule
2006

Construction Start

2008

Completed

Structural Engineer
Design

The Design Engineer is usually involved in the front end design, typically taking the leadership role in the Schematic Design and Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Material Supplier

Material Supplier refers to organizations which supplied significant systems/materials for a building project (e.g. elevator suppliers, facade suppliers, etc).

Elevator
Formwork
Owner/Developer
Winnervest Investment Pte Ltd
Architect
Design

Usually involved in the front end design, with a "typical" condition being that of a leadership role through either Schematic Design or Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

KCAP
Structural Engineer
Design

The Design Engineer is usually involved in the front end design, typically taking the leadership role in the Schematic Design and Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Contractor
Main Contractor

The main contractor is the supervisory contractor of all construction work on a project, management of sub-contractors and vendors, etc. May be referred to as "Construction Manager," however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Main Contractor" exclusively.

Aannemersbedrijf v/h Boele & Van Eesteren
Other Consultant

Other Consultant refers to other organizations which provided significant consultation services for a building project (e.g. wind consultants, environmental consultants, fire and life safety consultants, etc).

Development
Atelier V real estate
Interiors
Jan des Bouvrie
Material Supplier

Material Supplier refers to organizations which supplied significant systems/materials for a building project (e.g. elevator suppliers, facade suppliers, etc).

Elevator
Formwork

CTBUH Initiatives

The Red Apple Chosen as Featured Building

15 July 2012 - Featured Building

Research

24 February 2015

Taming Tall Buildings’ “Autistic” Tendencies

Kees Christiaanse, KCAP Rotterdam

The CTBUH is actively expanding the “Urban Habitat” portion of its mission, which calls for tall buildings to be optimally integrated into human-scaled urban environments....

About The Red Apple

The Red Apple is a residential complex with shops, cafés, restaurants and business spaces that towers skyward at the head of Rotterdam’s Wijnhaven Island (“Wine Harbor” Island). Wijnhaven Island forms a link between Rotterdam city center and the River Maas. It is being redeveloped using a dynamic transformation model, which provides development guidelines that ensure a balance between new and existing construction, as well as the preservation of views and sufficient incidence of daylight throughout the area.

The Red Apple building stands in a visually prominent position at the tip of Wijnhaven Island, with water on three sides and views across the river and the Oude Haven (“Old Harbor”). The Red Apple is a highly varied architectural mass where the existing block structure and integrates a number of the old office buildings into the new structure, in line with the stipulations of the dynamic transformation model.

The southwest corner of the site is occupied by a slender tower. The ground-floor entrance is a spacious glazed lobby. On the immediate floors above there are live/work loft spaces, while above the 21 meter (69ft) level there are apartments of various sizes, all diagonally oriented providing for optimal views.

The converging lines of Wijnhaven Island meet at The Red Apple, outlining a five-sided volume, part of which cantilevers beyond the substructure. In this block building, apartments of various size are grouped around a central atrium, offering orientation for the circulation routes internally. Due to large apertures in the façade, this atrium also offers a stunning vista across the city.

For both volumes, the tower and the cantilevered block, the panoramic views call for a maximum use of glass in the façade. Floor-to-ceiling solar glass between red bands of anodized aluminum characterize the façade and accentuate the building in the skyline from afar. The tower reveals the red bands as vertical lines which decrease in width towards the top to support its slender appearance. The block building is defined by horizontal layers. The red bands are formed by aluminum panels which gain their color through anodizing with no other color treatment. In the tower, they contain the load bearing structure of the façade and adapt in width to the increasing mass towards ground level.