Jeddah Tower
Jeddah Saudi Arabia

Note: As this project is under construction, the data is based on the most reliable information currently available. This data is thus subject to change until the building has completed and all information can be confirmed and ratified by the CTBUH.

Height

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

1
To Tip:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).

1000+ m / 3,281 + ft
2
Architectural:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

1000+ m / 3,281 + ft
1 2 Jeddah Tower Outline
Floors

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

167
Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

2
Height 1000 + m / 3,281 + ft
Floors 167
Official Name

The current legal building name.

Jeddah Tower
Other Names

Other names the building has commonly been known as, including former names, common informal names, local names, etc.

Kingdom Tower
Type

CTBUH collects data on two major types of tall structures: 'Buildings' and 'Telecommunications / Observation Towers.' A 'Building' is a structure where at least 50% of the height is occupied by usable floor area. A 'Telecommunications / Observation Tower' is a structure where less than 50% of the structure's height is occupied by usable floor area. Only 'Buildings' are eligible for the CTBUH 'Tallest Buildings' lists.

Building
Status
Completed
Architecturally Topped Out
Structurally Topped Out
Under Construction
Proposed
On Hold
Never Completed
Vision
Competition Entry
Canceled
Proposed Renovation
Under Renovation
Renovated
Under Demolition
Demolished
Under Construction
Country

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of Country, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

City

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of City, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

Function

A single-function tall building is defined as one where 85% or more of its usable floor area is dedicated to a single usage. Thus a building with 90% office floor area would be said to be an "office" building, irrespective of other minor functions it may also contain.

A mixed-use tall building contains two or more functions (or uses), where each of the functions occupy a significant proportion of the tower's total space. Support areas such as car parks and mechanical plant space do not constitute mixed-use functions. Functions are denoted on CTBUH "Tallest Building" lists in descending order, e.g., "hotel/office" indicates hotel function above office function.

residential / serviced apartments
Structural Material

Steel
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from steel. Note that a building of steel construction with a floor system of concrete planks or concrete slab on top of steel beams is still considered a “steel” structure as the concrete elements are not acting as the primary structure.

Reinforced Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from concrete which has been cast in place and utilizes steel reinforcement bars.

Precast Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning system are constructed from steel reinforced concrete which has been precast as individual components and assembled together on-site.

Mixed-Structure
Utilizes distinct systems (e.g. steel, concrete, timber), one on top of the other. For example, a steel/concrete indicates a steel structural system located on top of a concrete structural system, with the opposite true of concrete/steel.

Composite
A combination of materials (e.g. steel, concrete, timber) are used together in the main structural elements. Examples include buildings which utilize: steel columns with a floor system of reinforced concrete beams; a steel frame system with a concrete core; concrete-encased steel columns; concrete-filled steel tubes; etc. Where known, the CTBUH database breaks out the materials used in a composite building’s core, columns, and floor spanning separately.

concrete
Official Website
Height

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

Architectural
1000+ m / 3,281+ ft
To Tip
1000+ m / 3,281+ ft
Observatory
652 m / 2,139 ft
Floors Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

167
Floors Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

2
# of Apartments

Number of Apartments refers to the total number of residential units (including both rental units and condominiums) contained within a particular building.

439
# of Hotel Rooms

Number of Hotel Rooms refers to the total number of hotel rooms contained within a particular building.

200
# of Parking Spaces

Number of Parking Spaces refers to the total number of car parking spaces contained within a particular building.

2205
# of Elevators

Number of Elevators refers to the total number of elevator cars (not shafts) contained within a particular building (including public, private and freight elevators).

59
Tower GFA

Tower GFA refers to the total gross floor area within the tower footprint, not including adjoining podiums, connected buildings or other towers within the development.

243,866 m² / 2,624,952 ft²
Construction Schedule
2011

Proposed

2013

Construction Start

Architect
Structural Engineer
MEP Engineer
EC Harris; Mace Limited
Saudi Bin Laden Group

Damping

Façade Maintenance

Lee Herzog Consulting

Fire

Rolf Jensen & Associates

Geotechnical

Landscape

Quantity Surveyor

Omnium International Ltd.

Security

Aegis Defence Services Limited

Vertical Transportation

Fortune Shepler Consulting

Way Finding

Forcade Associates

Wind

Cladding

Dow; Guardian Glass; Jangho Group Co., Ltd.

Crane

Liebherr

Elevator

Formwork

CTBUH Initiatives

The Middle East: 30+ Years of Building Tall


28 November 2018 - CTBUH Research

CTBUH Study Examines Tallest Buildings with Dampers


22 August 2018 - CTBUH Research

See more

Videos

30 October 2017 | Jeddah

Quay Quarter Tower (QQT) will create a stunning new building on the Sydney skyline that sets new benchmarks in office tower design globally and creates...

See more

Research

25 June 2020

Sae Hwang Oh, Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture

Beginning in the late 19th century, construction of skyscrapers spread throughout Chicago, New York City, and then the world as demand of space in buildings...

See more

About Jeddah Tower

At the forefront of worldwide skyscraper activity, Jeddah Tower represents an unprecedented exercise that dares to go beyond the one kilometer threshold, a height that seemed only to exist in fantasy just years ago. Inspired by a bundle of leaves shooting up from the ground, it is meant to emanate the growth, prosperity, and regional emergence of its homeland on the global stage, a role that many of the world’s tallest buildings have played in their respective locales.

The multivariate form of the tower is rationalized by a “Y”-shaped plan and a continuously smooth taper, which will significantly reduce structural loads by obviating the need for the complicated outrigger transfers and belt trusses required in a setback approach. Furthermore, each wing of the tower will terminate at different heights, allowing them to taper at different rates and establish a distinct three-part spire. The supporting structure for the building is comprised entirely of cast-in-place reinforced concrete walls, coupling beams, and conventionally reinforced plate concrete floor framing. Due to the continuous and uninterrupted vertical nature of the walls, a highly efficient jump form system is utilized that will permit a continuous and uninterrupted construction process.

A series of balconies interrupt the smooth exterior, serving to provide both a cool outdoor element for occupants and shading for the tower’s surface, reducing direct solar radiation. Inside the tower, office floors are located at the bottom to take advantage of larger floor plates. These are followed by hotel, serviced apartments, and residential units of different sizes. At the very top, a massive penthouse will allow a tenant to reside at the crown of the building. Originally designed as a helipad, a circular sky terrace protrudes from one of the top levels, a feature that will be the highest of its kind in the world.

30 October 2017 | Jeddah

Quay Quarter Tower (QQT) will create a stunning new building on the Sydney skyline that sets new benchmarks in office tower design globally and creates...

16 March 2017 | Jeddah

Thursday, March 16, 2017. Chicago, United States of America. Hosted in collaboration with the Chicago Architecture Foundation, the first lecture of the series Building Tall...

16 March 2017 | Jeddah

Thursday, March 16, 2017. Chicago, United States of America. Hosted in collaboration with the Chicago Architecture Foundation, the first event in the Building Tall lecture...

18 October 2016 | Jeddah

Tuesday, October 18, 2016. Shenzhen, China. Ron Klemencic, Magnusson Klemencic Associates; Karl Almstead, Turner Construction Company; Andrew Nicholson, CBRE; Jon Pickard, Pickard Chilton; Ian Smith,...

18 October 2016 | Jeddah

Tuesday October 18, 2016. Shenzhen, China. Julian Chen, Henning Larsen Architects; Mounib Hammoud, Jeddah Economic Company; Denis Valode, Valode & Pistre Architects; Piere Marcout, Prisme...

18 October 2016 | Jeddah

Mounib Hammoud of Jeddah Economic Company is interviewed by Chris Bentley during the 2016 CTBUH China Conference. Mounib discusses the Jeddah Economic City development centered...

25 June 2020

Sae Hwang Oh, Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture

Beginning in the late 19th century, construction of skyscrapers spread throughout Chicago, New York City, and then the world as demand of space in buildings...

20 March 2020

CTBUH Research

In the first edition of the 2012 Journal, CTBUH published a Tall Buildings in Numbers study titled Tallest 20 in 2020: Era of the Megatall—The...

20 March 2020

CTBUH Research

This research paper undertakes a review of the 2012 report by the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat, “Tallest 20 in 2020: Entering the...

28 December 2019

SawTeen See, Robert Bird Group Pty Ltd

Aerodynamic damping through the use of vertical long slots reduces the dynamic component of the wind loads on the building. Seminal examples include the three-legged...

28 October 2019

Peter Weismantle, AS+GG; James Antell, Telgian Engineering & Consulting

As international design teams participated in the development of high-rise structures around the world, many of the concepts of fire-safe design first introduced in the...

20 October 2018

CTBUH Research

The Middle East region is hosting its first CTBUH International Conference since 2008. In that year, there were 119 completed buildings of 150 meters or...

28 November 2018

The Middle East: 30+ Years of Building Tall

CTBUH has released a Tall Buildings in Numbers (TBIN) interactive data study examining the relationship between high-rise growth and population in the Middle East.

22 August 2018

CTBUH Study Examines Tallest Buildings with Dampers

CTBUH has released a Tall Buildings in Numbers (TBIN) interactive data study on the world's tallest buildings with dampers.

31 January 2018

CTBUH Executive Director Antony Wood and Events Manager Jessica Rinkel-Miller traveled to Dubai in preparation for the 2018 Middle East Conference.

17 January 2018

2018 Tall Building Predictions

Check out all of our 2018 Tall Building Predictions, and dive into the full 2017 Tall Building Year in Review data report.

12 September 2017

Vertical Transportation: Ascent & Acceleration

CTBUH partnered with Guinness World Records to identify the commercial building with the fastest elevator speeds and longest vertical runs.

20 June 2017

Canada Event Considers “The Story of Marketing Tall Buildings”

Building up momentum for the CTBUH 2017 Conference in Australia, the CTBUH Canada Chapter held its most recent event at the University of Toronto Faculty Club.