90
Global
Height rank
Wilshire Grand Center
Los Angeles
Height

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

1
To Tip:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).

335.9 m / 1,102 ft
2
Architectural:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

335.3 m / 1,100 ft
3
Occupied:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest occupied floor within the building.

252.2 m / 827 ft
Floors

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

62
Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

5
1 2 3 Wilshire Grand Center Outline
Height 335.28 m / 1,100 ft
Floors 62
Official Name

The current legal building name.

Wilshire Grand Center
Other Names

Other names the building has commonly been known as, including former names, common informal names, local names, etc.

Wilshire Grand Tower
Type

CTBUH collects data on two major types of tall structures: 'Buildings' and 'Telecommunications / Observation Towers.' A 'Building' is a structure where at least 50% of the height is occupied by usable floor area. A 'Telecommunications / Observation Tower' is a structure where less than 50% of the structure's height is occupied by usable floor area. Only 'Buildings' are eligible for the CTBUH 'Tallest Buildings' lists.

Building
Status
Completed
Architecturally Topped Out
Structurally Topped Out
Under Construction
Proposed
On Hold
Never Completed
Vision
Competition Entry
Canceled
Proposed Renovation
Under Renovation
Renovated
Under Demolition
Demolished
Completed, 2017
Country

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of Country, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

City

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of City, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

Postal Code
90017
Function

A single-function tall building is defined as one where 85% or more of its usable floor area is dedicated to a single usage. Thus a building with 90% office floor area would be said to be an "office" building, irrespective of other minor functions it may also contain.

A mixed-use tall building contains two or more functions (or uses), where each of the functions occupy a significant proportion of the tower's total space. Support areas such as car parks and mechanical plant space do not constitute mixed-use functions. Functions are denoted on CTBUH "Tallest Building" lists in descending order, e.g., "hotel/office" indicates hotel function above office function.

hotel / office
Structural Material

Steel
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from steel. Note that a building of steel construction with a floor system of concrete planks or concrete slab on top of steel beams is still considered a “steel” structure as the concrete elements are not acting as the primary structure.

Reinforced Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from concrete which has been cast in place and utilizes steel reinforcement bars.

Precast Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning system are constructed from steel reinforced concrete which has been precast as individual components and assembled together on-site.

Mixed-Structure
Utilizes distinct systems (e.g. steel, concrete, timber), one on top of the other. For example, a steel/concrete indicates a steel structural system located on top of a concrete structural system, with the opposite true of concrete/steel.

Composite
A combination of materials (e.g. steel, concrete, timber) are used together in the main structural elements. Examples include buildings which utilize: steel columns with a floor system of reinforced concrete beams; a steel frame system with a concrete core; concrete-encased steel columns; concrete-filled steel tubes; etc. Where known, the CTBUH database breaks out the materials used in a composite building’s core, columns, and floor spanning separately.

composite
Core
Reinforced Concrete
Columns
Concrete Filled Steel
Floor Spanning
Steel
LEED Gold targeted
Official Website
Height

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

Architectural
335.28 m / 1,100 ft
To Tip
335.9 m / 1,102 ft
Occupied
252.22 m / 827 ft
Floors Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

62
Floors Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

5
# of Hotel Rooms

Number of Hotel Rooms refers to the total number of hotel rooms contained within a particular building.

890
# of Parking Spaces

Number of Parking Spaces refers to the total number of car parking spaces contained within a particular building.

1092
# of Elevators

Number of Elevators refers to the total number of elevator cars (not shafts) contained within a particular building (including public, private and freight elevators).

38
Tower GFA

Tower GFA refers to the total gross floor area within the tower footprint, not including adjoining podiums, connected buildings or other towers within the development.

187,027 m² / 2,013,142 ft²
Rankings
#
90
Tallest in the World
#
14
Tallest in North America
#
14
Tallest in United States
#
1
Tallest in Los Angeles
#
45
Tallest Mixed-use Building in the World
#
5
Tallest Mixed-use Building in North America
#
5
Tallest Mixed-use Building in United States
#
1
Tallest Mixed-use Building in Los Angeles
#
54
Tallest Composite Building in the World
#
5
Tallest Composite Building in North America
#
5
Tallest Composite Building in United States
#
1
Tallest Composite Building in Los Angeles
Construction Schedule
2009

Proposed

2013

Construction Start

2017

Completed

Structural Engineer
MEP Engineer
Contractor

Façade Maintenance

Wind

Owner
Hanjin International Corporation; Korean Air
Developer
Martin Project Management
Architect
AC Martin
Structural Engineer
Brandow & Johnston Inc
MEP Engineer
AC Martin
Contractor

Acoustics

Veneklasen Associates

Civil

Breen Engineering

Code

Simpson Gumpertz & Heger
Benson Industries, Inc.; Heitmann & Associates, Inc.

Façade Maintenance

Food Service

Cini-Little International Inc.

Interiors

AC Martin; Wilson Associates

Landscape

RELM Studio

LEED

Brightworks

Life Safety

Exponet

Lighting

Lighting Design Alliance

Parking

Choate Parking Consultants

Property Management

InterContinental Hotels Group

Roofing

Independent Roofing Consultants

Sustainability

Brightworks

Vertical Transportation

Fortune Shepler Consulting

Way Finding

Selbert Perkins Design

Wind

Cladding

Viracon

Concrete

Conco

Steel

Schuff Steel

CTBUH Awards & Distinctions

Structural Engineering Award 2019 Award of Excellence

2019 CTBUH Awards

CTBUH Initiatives

CTBUH Study Examines Tallest Buildings with Dampers


22 August 2018 - CTBUH Research

Videos

16 October 2016 | Los Angeles

Abrar Sheriff of Turner International is interviewed by Chris Bentley during the 2016 CTBUH China Conference. Abrar discusses the planning and construction process for supertall...

Research

01 September 2018

Atsushi Watanabe, Nippon Steel & Sumikin Engineer

Buckling-Restrained Braces (BRBs) have been widely applied to tall buildings in seismic areas in the world. In this paper the author summarizes representative types of...

About Wilshire Grand Center

The Wilshire Grand Center marks a new era for tall buildings in Los Angeles; it will be an exciting addition to the visual character of the Downtown area, and offer a contemporary contrast to its surroundings with its sail-shaped form. The development will boast luxury hotel rooms, restaurants, businesses, and nightlife options. Topped with a curved roof that diverges from the traditional flat roof style of most tall buildings nearby, the Wilshire Grand Center will rise well above its surroundings. The tower is designed to be the tallest structure in the Los Angeles skyline, and will do much to add to the cultural and economic vibrancy of the neighborhood.

The project team strove to design a high-performing building that intelligently addresses the specific environmental issues facing Southern California. Architects and engineers employed the latest construction techniques and sustainability considerations to ensure that this project is built and operated in a way that is ecologically responsible, and will allow the building to achieve a LEED Silver certification. The design team worked closely with the City of Los Angeles to incorporate strategies such as thermal energy storage and the reuse of storm water in cooling towers. Innovative lighting and climate systems are also in place to significantly reduce overall energy consumption.

The city’s culture and climate are celebrated with a strong sense of indoor/outdoor relationships created at every practical opportunity. Ballrooms open directly onto gardens, the prefunction space extends to a terrace, pool decks are lined with cabanas, and outdoor meeting rooms encircle fire pits. The hotel rooms and office space feature floor-to-ceiling glass to maximize the spectacular views of Santa Monica and the Pacific Ocean, the Hollywood Hills, and the San Gabriel Mountains.

CTBUH Awards & Distinctions

Structural Engineering Award 2019 Award of Excellence

2019 CTBUH Awards

16 October 2016 | Los Angeles

Abrar Sheriff of Turner International is interviewed by Chris Bentley during the 2016 CTBUH China Conference. Abrar discusses the planning and construction process for supertall...

01 September 2018

Atsushi Watanabe, Nippon Steel & Sumikin Engineer

Buckling-Restrained Braces (BRBs) have been widely applied to tall buildings in seismic areas in the world. In this paper the author summarizes representative types of...

01 September 2018

Toru Takeuchi & Akira Wada, Tokyo Institute of Technology

Buckling-restrained braces (BRBs) are widely used as highly ductile seismic devices, with the first building using BRBs completed in 1989 in Tokyo, and thousands more...

05 February 2018

This 2017 Tall Building Year in Review / Tall Buildings in Numbers data analysis report shows that more buildings of 200 meters’ height or greater...

08 August 2017

Hi sun Choi & Leonard M. Joseph, Thornton Tomasetti; SawTeen See, Leslie E. Robertson Associates; Rupa Garai, Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP

In 2012, CTBUH published the first Outrigger Design for High-Rise Buildings Technical Guide. In 2016, the CTBUH Outrigger Working Group felt it would be beneficial...

01 March 2016

Leonard M. Joseph, C. Kerem Gulec, and Justin M. Schwaiger, Thornton Tomasetti

The 335 m tall Wilshire Grand Center tower under construction in Los Angeles illustrates many key outrigger issues. The tower has a long, narrow floor...

5 December 2018

These projects will be represented at the CTBUH 2019 Tall + Urban Innovation Conference, where they will compete in real time for winning distinctions in each category.

22 August 2018

CTBUH Study Examines Tallest Buildings with Dampers

CTBUH has released a Tall Buildings in Numbers (TBIN) interactive data study on the world's tallest buildings with dampers.

13 October 2016

The Council is pleased to announce the Top Company Rankings for numerous disciplines as derived from the list of projects appearing in 100 of the World’s Tallest Buildings.

30 October 2015

CTBUH 2015 delegates toured Los Angeles buildings of many renown architects including Frank Lloyd Wright, Frank Gehry, Renzo Piano, Richard Meier, and Rudolph Schindler.