Central Park

Sydney
Height
1
To Tip:
Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).
117 m / 384 ft
2
Architectural:
Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."
117 m / 384 ft
3
Occupied:
Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest occupied floor within the building.
110.6 m / 363 ft
  Floors
Above Ground
The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).
34
Below Ground
The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.
4
1 2 3 One Central Park Outline
Official Name
The current legal building name.

Central Park

Type

Complex

Status
Completed
Architecturally Topped Out
Structurally Topped Out
Under Construction
Proposed
On Hold
Never Completed
Vision
Competition Entry
Canceled
Proposed Renovation
Under Renovation
Renovated
Under Demolition
Demolished

Completed

Country

Australia

City

Sydney

Function

hotel / residential

# of Apartments

2,089

# of Hotel Rooms

297

# of Parking Spaces

625

Map of Buildings in Complex

Note: Only buildings that have GPS coordinates recorded are displayed.

 

List of Buildings in Complex

RANK
Name
Height
1 One Central Park

117 m / 384 ft

2 The Mark

90 m / 295 ft

3 DUO West

71 m / 232 ft

4 DUO East

66 m / 216 ft

5 8 Park Lane

63 m / 207 ft

6 Two Central Park

60 m / 197 ft

6 Unilodge Central Park

60 m / 197 ft

CTBUH Awards & Distinctions

Urban Habitat Award, District/Master Plan Scale 2019 Winner

2019 CTBUH Awards

Best Tall Building Worldwide 2014 Winner

2014 CTBUH Awards

10 Year Award 2024 Award of Excellence

2024 CTBUH Awards

See more

CTBUH Initiatives

CTBUH Executive Director Presents at Chapter Events in Australia

7 March 2017 - Event

Skin NY

27 August 2015 - Event

Videos

31 October 2017

Interview: Elizabeth Farrelly

Elizabeth Farrelly, of the Sydney Morning Herald and Australian School of Urbanism, is interviewed by Chris Bentley during the 2017 CTBUH Australia Conference

Research

22 December 2023

Skyscrapers in Bloom: Evaluating the Artistry of “Painting with Trees”

Katarzyna Wodzisz

Incorporating greenery in skyscrapers prompts sustainability debates. This study questions the assumption that green features ensure sustainability, as designers often adopt them carelessly, leading to...

About One Central Park

One Central Park (OCP) is an innovative and environmentally ambitious landmark project within the redevelopment of the Carlton & United Brewery site near Central Station in Sydney. The overall planning intent is to adhere to the highest standards of sustainable residential design under the Australian Green Star rating system and support the vision of an environmentally responsible future for the city.

In order to make the two towers of OCP visibly greener than is normally perceivable in Green Star developments, the design takes a broader approach to carbon-conscious design. With the help of two unusual technologies - hydroponics and heliostats - plants are grown all around the building to provide organic shading, and direct sunlight is harvested all year long for heating and lighting. The shading saves cooling energy, while the redirected sunlight is an all-year light source for the building precinct and adjoining park. Beyond the bravado of their technical deployment and performance, the plants and reflected daylight are also just natural resources, made available in an unusual way for the enjoyment of Sydney's residents.

Of particular note is the inclusion of a park at the tower’s base. The first design challenge was to give the new park a real presence at an urban scale. Because OCP is a high-rise, it is possible to bring the park up into the sky along its facades and make it visible in the city at a distance. On the south side, the park rises in a sequence of planted plateaus scattered like puzzle pieces in randomized patterns across the facades, so that each apartment has not only a balcony, but also its own piece of the park. At the individual scale, this creates pleasant private gardens. At a collective scale, it’s a green urban sculpture.

On the north, east and west sides, the green takes more continuous veil-like appearances with green walls, continuous planter bands and climbing vegetation. The plants deliver a message of sustainability, and because their shade reduces energy consumption for cooling and their leaves trap carbon dioxide, they also effectively make the building more sustainable. In total, more than 5 kilometers of planters function like permanent shading shelves and reduce thermal impact in the apartments by up to 30 percent. The plants also trap Carbon Dioxide, emit Oxygen and reflect less heat back into the city than traditional fixed shading. The plants are irrigated with recycled grey and black water, and their growth can be custom-tailored to the needs of each façade area.

A design challenge arises from the tall massing along the north side of the site. In order to remediate overshadowing of the park, the volume is broken up into a lower and a taller tower. On the roof of the lower tower, 42 heliostats (sunlight tracking mirrors) redirect sunlight up to 320 reflectors on a cantilever off the taller tower, which then beam the light down into areas that would otherwise be in permanent shade. The system adapts hourly and seasonally to the need for brightness and warmth, redirecting heat to absorbent pool of water atop the atrium glass in summer, which can be drained to assist with heating in the winter. The system redirects up to 200 square meters of direct sunlight and utilizes approximately 40 percent of the corresponding power during Sydney’s 26,00 annual sunshine hours. The performance of this system is not accounted for in the BASIX (Building Sustainability Index of New South Wales) and Green Star calculations.

Dappled lights move on the ground in a precisely programmed choreography. At night, the heliostat becomes a monumental urban chandelier and appears in the dark sky like a floating pool of tiny LED lights that merge into a giant screen and simulate reflections of glittering harbor waters.

One Central Park assists Sydney in its goal of moving towards improving its carbon footprint. The project provides much-needed apartments in the city’s main job market at its urban core. It reduces energy consumption by 25 percent when compared to a conventional building of its size. Thermal impact of sunlight on the building is reduced by up to 30 percent because of the presence of greenery, which of course traps carbon dioxide and emits oxygen as well.

CTBUH Awards & Distinctions

Best Tall Building Worldwide 2014 Winner

2014 CTBUH Awards

10 Year Award 2024 Award of Excellence

2024 CTBUH Awards

Innovation Award 2014 Award of Excellence

2014 CTBUH Awards

Best Tall Building, by Region, Asia & Australasia 2014 Winner

2014 CTBUH Awards

31 October 2017

Interview: Elizabeth Farrelly

Elizabeth Farrelly, of the Sydney Morning Herald and Australian School of Urbanism, is interviewed by Chris Bentley during the 2017 CTBUH Australia Conference

12 March 2015

Urban Regeneration Seminar – One Central Park: Mark Giles, PTW Architects

Mark Giles, Senior Associate, PTW Architects presents at the first CTBUH Australia Urban Regeneration Seminar on the completion of One Central Park, Sydney.

12 March 2015

Urban Regeneration Seminar – One Central Park: Mark Giles, PTW Architects

After an introduction from John Flynn, the Australia Chairman, Mark Giles, a Senior Associate at PTW Architects presents at the first CTBUH Australia Urban Regeneration...

12 March 2015

Urban Regeneration Seminar – One Central Park: Matt Harding, Robert Bird Group

Matt Harding, Principal, Robert Bird Group presents at the first CTBUH Australia Urban Regeneration Seminar on the structure of One Central Park, Sydney.

12 March 2015

Urban Regeneration Seminar – One Central Park: Question and Answer

The Question and Answer session of the first CTBUH Australia Urban Regeneration Seminar on One Central Park, Sydney featured speakers: Mark Giles, Senior Associate, PTW...

12 March 2015

Urban Regeneration Seminar – One Central Park: Robert Saidman, Arup

Robert Saidman, Principal, Arup presents at the first CTBUH Australia Urban Regeneration Seminar on the services of One Central Park, Sydney.

06 November 2014

2014 Awards - Session 3 Q&A

Thursday, 6th November 2014 Chicago, USA. Leslie Shepherd, Chief Architect, General Services Administration, James Cutler, Founding Partner, Cutler Anderson Architects, Michael Goldrick, Project Management Director,...

06 November 2014

Best Tall Building Asia & Australasia: Tall, Green, and Generous: One Central Park

One Central Park (OCP) is an innovative and environmentally ambitious landmark project within the redevelopment of the Carlton & United Brewery site near Central Station...

06 November 2014

CTBUH 13th Annual Awards Dinner

The 13th Annual Awards Ceremony & Dinner was held in Mies van der Rohe's iconic Crown Hall, on the Illinois Institute of Technology campus, Chicago....

06 November 2014

Interview: One Central Park

Thursday 6th November 2014. Chicago, IL. Michael Goldrick, Frasers Property, and Bertram Beissel, Ateliers Jean Nouvel, are interviewed by Chris Bentley regarding the Best Tall...

22 December 2023

Skyscrapers in Bloom: Evaluating the Artistry of “Painting with Trees”

Katarzyna Wodzisz

Incorporating greenery in skyscrapers prompts sustainability debates. This study questions the assumption that green features ensure sustainability, as designers often adopt them carelessly, leading to...

17 September 2021

Sustainable Tall Building Design Exemplars

Will Miranda & Daniel Safarik, CTBUH

Some 97 cities worldwide, including most of the world’s megacities with a population of 10 million or more, have signed onto the C40 Cities Climate...

11 October 2019

Tall Buildings in Numbers: 50 Years of Tall Building Evolution

CTBUH Research

The default image of the skyscraper for the past 50 years in the public imagination has likely been the extruded, rectilinear corporate “box,” derived from...

06 November 2014

Case Study: One Central Park, Sydney

Jean Nouvel & Bertram Beissel, Ateliers Jean Nouvel

One Central Park was developed as a response to growing demand for residential accommodation in downtown Sydney. Its developers and designers used the opportunity to...

9 March 2017

CTBUH Executive Director Presents at Chapter Events in Australia

Executive Director Antony Wood delivered two well attended lectures in Sydney and Melbourne, organized by the respective local CTBUH committees.

27 August 2015

Skin NY

CTBUH New York, in association with the New York Young Professionals Committee hosted an event entitled Skin:NY that focused on high-rise façade design and construction

22 May 2015

Inaugural Japan Symposium Rises to the Occasion in Tokyo

CTBUH held its inaugural Japan Symposium at the Academy Hills lecture hall of the Mori Tower in Roppongi Hills, bringing together leading experts

12 March 2015

CTBUH Australia Hosts Urban Regeneration Seminar

More than 100 people attended the presentation on One Central Park, the first of CTBUH Australia's Urban Regeneration Breakfast Seminars.