World Trade Center

New York City
Height
1
To Tip:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).

526.7 m / 1,728 ft
2
Architectural:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

417 m / 1,368 ft
3
Occupied:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest occupied floor within the building.

413 m / 1,355 ft
1 2 3 One World Trade Center Outline
Floors
Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

110
Official Name
The current legal building name.

World Trade Center

Type

Complex

Status
Completed
Architecturally Topped Out
Structurally Topped Out
Under Construction
Proposed
On Hold
Never Completed
Vision
Competition Entry
Canceled
Proposed Renovation
Under Renovation
Renovated
Under Demolition
Demolished

Demolished

Country

United States

Function

hotel / office

# of Hotel Rooms

825

Map of Buildings in Complex

Note: Only buildings that have GPS coordinates recorded are displayed.

 

List of Buildings in Complex

Rank
Building Name
Status
Completed
Architecturally Topped Out
Structurally Topped Out
Under Construction
Proposed
On Hold
Never Completed
Vision
Competition Entry
Canceled
Proposed Renovation
Under Renovation
Renovated
Under Demolition
Demolished
Completion
Height
Floors
Material
Use
1 One World Trade Center
1972 417 m / 1,368 ft 110 steel office
2 Two World Trade Center
1973 415.1 m / 1,362 ft 110 steel office
3 Seven World Trade Center
1987 173.7 m / 570 ft 47 steel office
4 Marriott World Trade Center
1981 73.8 m / 242 ft 22 steel hotel

CTBUH Initiatives

Videos

20 October 2016

Singularly Slender: Sky Living in New York, Hong Kong, and Elsewhere

Thursday October 20, 2016. Hong Kong, China. Carol Willis of The Skyscraper Museum in New York City presents at the 2016 China Conference Plenary 7:...

Research

28 October 2019

World’s Biggest (Tall) Buildings

Carol Willis, The Skyscraper Museum

In both professional circles and in the public eye, the subject of the World’s Tallest Building (WTB) has held the spotlight for more than a...

Global News

12 February 2019

Two World Trade Center in New York City May Rise Without an Anchor Tenant

One of the final pieces of the World Trade Center puzzle may be put into place—albeit in a somewhat risky fashion. Bloomberg reports that Larry...

20 October 2016

Singularly Slender: Sky Living in New York, Hong Kong, and Elsewhere

Thursday October 20, 2016. Hong Kong, China. Carol Willis of The Skyscraper Museum in New York City presents at the 2016 China Conference Plenary 7:...

17 October 2016

Structural & Geotechnic Engineering Q&A

Monday, October 17, 2016. Shenzhen, China. William O'Donnell, DeSimone Consulting Engineers; Dennis Poon, Thornton Tomasetti; SawTeen Seen, Leslie E. Robertson Associates, answer questions at the...

27 October 2015

From New York to Busan: Reflecting Culture in Urban Design

Overpopulation, climate change, aging infrastructure: the threats facing tomorrow’s cities are, in many ways, design problems. The challenges of today’s world have to be solved...

26 October 2015

Interview: Rafael Viñoly

Rafael Viñoly of Rafael Viñoly Architects is interviewed by Chris Bentley during the 2015 CTBUH New York Conference at the Grand Hyatt New York. Rafael...

28 October 2019

World’s Biggest (Tall) Buildings

Carol Willis, The Skyscraper Museum

In both professional circles and in the public eye, the subject of the World’s Tallest Building (WTB) has held the spotlight for more than a...

01 September 2018

Developments of Structural Systems Toward Mile-High Towers

Kyoung Sun Moon, Yale University School of Architecture

Tall buildings which began from about 40 m tall office towers in the late 19th century have evolved into mixed-use megatall towers over 800 m....

17 October 2016

Singularly Slender: Sky Living in New York, Hong Kong, and Elsewhere

Carol Willis, The Skyscraper Museum

This paper highlights a new 21st-century skyscraper typology – the very tall and slender residential tower – and analyzes the economic, engineering, and urbanistic forces...

11 September 2011

The Global Impact of 9/11

Leader Interviews by Jan Klerks, CTBUH

Just as many Americans still remember exactly where they were when they heard the news that US president John F. Kennedy had been shot, most...

01 September 2008

Trends, Drivers and Challenges in Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat

Antony Wood, CTBUH

This paper outlines the major influences on tall building design in the early stages of the 21st Century. At this unprecedented time in terms of...

12 June 2008

The Tallest Buildings in the World: Past, Present & Future

CTBUH Research

Over time, the average height of the 100 tallest buildings in the world has been steadily increasing. However, by 2010, this average height will have...

16 October 2005

Bridging the gap: An analysis of proposed evacuation links at height in the World Trade Centre design competition entries

Antony Wood & Philip Oldfield, University of Nottingham

This paper analyses the skybridge links of the numerous re-design proposals for the World Trade Centre Towers, with the aim of establishing their advantages and...

16 October 2005

Bridging the Gap: Proposed Evacuation Links at Height in the World Trade Center Design Entries

Antony Wood & Philip Oldfield, University of Nottingham

This paper proposes to analyse in detail the skybridge links of the WTC replacement designs – impact on evacuation, structure, façade, tower operation etc –...

16 October 2005

Tall Building Emergency Evacuation: “Time To Think Differently”

Dr. Jonathan (Yoni) Shimshoni, Escape Rescue Systems

This paper presents developments in the area of high-rise building emergency evacuation solutions, especially in three categories: Platform Devices; Chute Devices; and Controlled Descent Devices,...

10 October 2004

A Study on the Collapse Control Design Method for High-rise Steel Buildings

Akira Wada, Tokyo Institute of Tech.; Kenichi Ohi, Kobe University; Hiroaki Suzuki, University of Tsukuba et al.

This paper presents a new collapse control design method for high-rise steel building structures. The method presented here to prevent progressive collapse until the completion...

28 October 2015

CTBUH 2015 delegates toured One World Trade Center Office Building which is the current tallest building in the Americas.

28 October 2015

CTBUH 2015 delegates toured 30 Park Place which will house the Four Seasons Hotel and Private Residences Downtown New York.

20 November 2014

CTBUH Israel Plays Key Role at Building Center Summit

The CTBUH Israel Chapter was a major presence at the annual Building Center Summit, in Eilat City, drawing over 2,000 people.

6 September 2011

9/11 – Ten Years on: CTBUH Reflections

In the week that we mark the tenth anniversary of the 9/11 events and the collapse of the World Trade Center towers CTBUH reflected on the impact on tall buildings.

16 December 2009

Height: The History of Measuring Tall Buildings

This article describes some of the events which took place in the Council's long, and sometimes complex, history of measuring tall buildings.