Doha Tower
Doha
Height

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

1
To Tip:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).

238.1 m / 781 ft
2
Architectural:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

238.1 m / 781 ft
3
Occupied:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest occupied floor within the building.

190.4 m / 625 ft
1 2 3 Doha Tower Outline
Floors

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

46
Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

3
Height 238.1 m / 781 ft
Floors 46
Official Name

The current legal building name.

Doha Tower
Other Names

Other names the building has commonly been known as, including former names, common informal names, local names, etc.

Burj Qatar, Doha High Rise Office Building
Type

CTBUH collects data on two major types of tall structures: 'Buildings' and 'Telecommunications / Observation Towers.' A 'Building' is a structure where at least 50% of the height is occupied by usable floor area. A 'Telecommunications / Observation Tower' is a structure where less than 50% of the structure's height is occupied by usable floor area. Only 'Buildings' are eligible for the CTBUH 'Tallest Buildings' lists.

Building
Status
Completed
Architecturally Topped Out
Structurally Topped Out
Under Construction
Proposed
On Hold
Never Completed
Vision
Competition Entry
Canceled
Proposed Renovation
Under Renovation
Renovated
Under Demolition
Demolished
Completed, 2012
Country

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of Country, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

City

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of City, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

Postal Code
7863
Function

A single-function tall building is defined as one where 85% or more of its usable floor area is dedicated to a single usage. Thus a building with 90% office floor area would be said to be an "office" building, irrespective of other minor functions it may also contain.

A mixed-use tall building contains two or more functions (or uses), where each of the functions occupy a significant proportion of the tower's total space. Support areas such as car parks and mechanical plant space do not constitute mixed-use functions. Functions are denoted on CTBUH "Tallest Building" lists in descending order, e.g., "hotel/office" indicates hotel function above office function.

office
Structural Material

Steel
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from steel. Note that a building of steel construction with a floor system of concrete planks or concrete slab on top of steel beams is still considered a “steel” structure as the concrete elements are not acting as the primary structure.

Reinforced Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from concrete which has been cast in place and utilizes steel reinforcement bars.

Precast Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning system are constructed from steel reinforced concrete which has been precast as individual components and assembled together on-site.

Mixed-Structure
Utilizes distinct systems (e.g. steel, concrete, timber), one on top of the other. For example, a steel/concrete indicates a steel structural system located on top of a concrete structural system, with the opposite true of concrete/steel.

Composite
A combination of materials (e.g. steel, concrete, timber) are used together in the main structural elements. Examples include buildings which utilize: steel columns with a floor system of reinforced concrete beams; a steel frame system with a concrete core; concrete-encased steel columns; concrete-filled steel tubes; etc. Where known, the CTBUH database breaks out the materials used in a composite building’s core, columns, and floor spanning separately.

concrete/steel
Official Website
Height

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

Architectural
238.1 m / 781 ft
To Tip
238.1 m / 781 ft
Occupied
190.42 m / 625 ft
Observatory
190.42 m / 625 ft
Floors Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

46
Floors Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

3
# of Apartments

Number of Apartments refers to the total number of residential units (including both rental units and condominiums) contained within a particular building.

2
# of Parking Spaces

Number of Parking Spaces refers to the total number of car parking spaces contained within a particular building.

867
# of Elevators

Number of Elevators refers to the total number of elevator cars (not shafts) contained within a particular building (including public, private and freight elevators).

28
Rankings
#
99
Tallest in Middle East
#
6
Tallest in Qatar
#
6
Tallest in Doha
#
297
Tallest Office Building in the World
#
29
Tallest Office Building in Middle East
#
4
Tallest Office Building in Qatar
#
4
Tallest Office Building in Doha
#
23
Tallest Mixed-material Building in the World
#
12
Tallest Mixed-material Building in Middle East
#
1
Tallest Mixed-material Building in Qatar
#
1
Tallest Mixed-material Building in Doha
Construction Schedule
2004

Proposed

2005

Construction Start

2012

Completed

Owner
H.E. Sheikh Saoud Bin Mohamed Bin Ali Al-Thani; H.E. Sheikh Saoud Bin Mohamed Bin Ali Al-Thani
Developer
H.E. Sheikh Saoud Bin Mohamed Bin Ali Al-Thani
Architect
Ateliers Jean Nouvel
Structural Engineer
MEP Engineer
Contractor

Marketing

Wordsearch

Wind

Centre Scientifique et Technique du Bâtiment

Elevator

CTBUH Awards & Distinctions

Best Tall Building Worldwide 2012 Winner

2012 CTBUH Awards

Best Tall Building Middle East & Africa 2012 Winner

2012 CTBUH Awards

CTBUH Initiatives

CTBUH Representatives Accompany Saudi Visit to Qatar, UAE


14 October 2014 - Building Tour

Gartner Steel and Glass on Challenges in Façade Construction


15 January 2013 - Event

Videos

18 October 2012 | Doha

The distinctive cylindrical form is elegant and efficient, creating a distinctive new landmark for the fast-growing Qatar capital. The façade is constructed of multi-layered patterns...

About Doha Tower

Located on a prominent coastline thoroughfare in the Qatari capital, Al Corniche Street, Doha Tower adds a prominent yet subtle addition to the Doha cityscape. Located near the ministries and government departments as well as the future Al Bidda metro station, the location on the waterfront is ideal. The cylindrical form of the tower was decided upon for its efficiency in floor-to-window area and relative distances between offices and elevators. Additionally, the core of the building has been shifted off-center to allow more flexible floor area for the office spaces.

Overlooking the Gulf, the tower provides floors of offices, a restaurant with panoramic views, and a private residence at the penthouse. The tower is topped by a full-span dome and a spire, and clad entirely in an intricately patterned stainless steel screen.

The cladding system is a reference to the traditional Islamic “mashrabiya,” or artistic screen used for shading or room dividing. The design for the system involved using a single geometric motif at several scales, overlaid at different densities along the façade. The overlays occur in response to the solar conditions: 25% opacity was placed on the north elevation, 40% on the south, and 60% on the east and west. From afar, the screen appears as a uniform density, but the intricacy of the layering and scaling of the screens becomes apparent at a closer viewpoint, lending the building multiple textural experiences.

Behind the shading layer is a typical curtain wall system that is accessed for maintenance from walkways in the cavity between the two layers. User-operable solar shades are also available behind the glazed curtain wall. The overall façade system is estimated to reduce cooling loads by 20%. At night, an integrated lighting system enhances the delicate screen with programmable light shows.

The base of the tower has a 25-meter-wide pergola to provide a shaded entry, as well as a lushly planted garden. A gentle grade slopes down to the lobby entrance, emphasizing the tower’s connection to the earth supporting it. Landscaping covers 40% of the site, adding to the pedestrian experience. Below grade, three levels of parking accommodate a total of 870 cars solely for the office tenants.

A large interior atrium houses eight glass lifts; the atrium reaches a height of 112 meters, up to level 27 which offers a transfer lobby between low- and high-zones. The transparent lifts offer views of the surrounding city. The structure of the tower is a non-traditional concrete diagrid with canted columns forming an X-shaped framing system. This system creates a unique effect in the office spaces in conjunction with the façade screen. In contrast to more typical office towers, the spatial quality of the interior is one of ever-changing patterns of light and texture, breaking the standard of monotony.

The office floors are flexible and allow a variety of configurations. In addition, the latest technology has been provided for office tenants, including fiber optic telephone cables and satellite TV. Though the efficiency of the plan was the highest priority, the overall form of the building gives each floor a unique size and a slightly different effect.

In an unexpected twist from most office towers, a grand private residence is located within the dome of the tower at 182 meters above ground level. The luxury residence has its own private entrance into the building and elevator service, along with private access to the adjacent restaurant below. The breathtaking effect of the culmination of the dome structure and screen creates a truly singular space. Included in the residence are a sauna and pool along with typical residential amenities. Offering 360 degree views of the surrounding city, the residence is truly like no other.

Building upon previous projects, the design team utilized knowledge gained in other contexts to bring the building full-circle. The tower makes a distinct and direct connection to the local culture and practice through the use of the façade screen while responding to the climate appropriately. The design provides a flexible, efficient, and interesting workplace for office occupants and considers the needs of the owner. Lastly, the building makes an iconic statement and stands as a trademark of the Doha skyline in both daytime and nighttime though its textural façade and integrated architectural lighting.

CTBUH Awards & Distinctions

Best Tall Building Worldwide 2012 Winner

2012 CTBUH Awards

Best Tall Building Middle East & Africa 2012 Winner

2012 CTBUH Awards

18 October 2012 | Doha

The distinctive cylindrical form is elegant and efficient, creating a distinctive new landmark for the fast-growing Qatar capital. The façade is constructed of multi-layered patterns...

18 October 2012 | Doha

The 11th Annual Awards Ceremony & Dinner was held in Mies van der Rohe's iconic Crown Hall, on the Illinois Institute of Technology campus, Chicago....

18 October 2012 | Doha

Hassan Al Duhaimi and Hafid Rakem discuss the Best Tall Building Middle East & Africa, Doha Tower, and how the design approach to culture, context,...

14 October 2014

CTBUH Representatives Accompany Saudi Visit to Qatar, UAE

Henning Larsen Architects have been commissioned to design a sizable new headquarters building for a key Saudi organization and visited similar projects in Qatar and UAE.

15 January 2013

Gartner Steel and Glass on Challenges in Façade Construction

Two directors from Gartner, one of the world's largest fabricators and erectors of façades, present on the challenges of façade construction and the use of cable façades.

1 November 2012

Doha Tower Chosen as Featured Building

Doha Tower stands out for its deft and subtle sensitivity to culture, context, and climate.

1 November 2012

Doha Tower Receives Best Tall Building Worldwide 2012 Honor

Doha Tower was recognized as the overall "Best Tall Building Worldwide" and "Best Tall Building Middle East & Africa" in the 2012 CTBUH Awards Program.

19 October 2012

Doha Tower Named Best Tall Building Worldwide

Doha Tower was recognized as the overall "Best Tall Building Worldwide" and "Best Tall Building Middle East & Africa" in the 2012 CTBUH Awards Program.

27 September 2010

CTBUH Activities in Qatar

The local CTBUH Qatar Chapter organized their 2nd regional meeting, while CTBUH Communications Manager Jan Klerks was invited to speak at TowerTech trade fair in Doha.