158
Global
Height rank

The Shard

London
Height
1
To Tip:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).

306 m / 1,004 ft
2
Architectural:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

306 m / 1,004 ft
3
Occupied:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest occupied floor within the building.

244.3 m / 802 ft
1 2 3 The Shard Outline
Floors
Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

73
Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

3
Height 306.0 m / 1,004 ft
Floors 73
Official Name
The current legal building name.

The Shard

Other Names
Other names the building has commonly been known as, including former names, common informal names, local names, etc.

The Shard of Glass, London Bridge Tower, The Shard at London Bridge

Type
CTBUH collects data on two major types of tall structures: 'Buildings' and 'Telecommunications / Observation Towers.' A 'Building' is a structure where at least 50% of the height is occupied by usable floor area. A 'Telecommunications / Observation Tower' is a structure where less than 50% of the structure's height is occupied by usable floor area. Only 'Buildings' are eligible for the CTBUH 'Tallest Buildings' lists.

Building

Status
Completed
Architecturally Topped Out
Structurally Topped Out
Under Construction
Proposed
On Hold
Never Completed
Vision
Competition Entry
Canceled
Proposed Renovation
Under Renovation
Renovated
Under Demolition
Demolished

Completed, 2013

Country
The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of Country, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

United Kingdom

City
The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of City, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

London

Postal Code

SE1 9SG

Function
A single-function tall building is defined as one where 85% or more of its usable floor area is dedicated to a single usage. Thus a building with 90% office floor area would be said to be an "office" building, irrespective of other minor functions it may also contain.

A mixed-use tall building contains two or more functions (or uses), where each of the functions occupy a significant proportion of the tower's total space. Support areas such as car parks and mechanical plant space do not constitute mixed-use functions. Functions are denoted on CTBUH "Tallest Building" lists in descending order, e.g., "hotel/office" indicates hotel function above office function.

residential / hotel / office

Structural Material
Steel
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from steel. Note that a building of steel construction with a floor system of concrete planks or concrete slab on top of steel beams is still considered a “steel” structure as the concrete elements are not acting as the primary structure.

Reinforced Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from concrete which has been cast in place and utilizes steel reinforcement bars.

Precast Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning system are constructed from steel reinforced concrete which has been precast as individual components and assembled together on-site.

Mixed-Structure
Utilizes distinct systems (e.g. steel, concrete, timber), one on top of the other. For example, a steel/concrete indicates a steel structural system located on top of a concrete structural system, with the opposite true of concrete/steel.

Composite
A combination of materials (e.g. steel, concrete, timber) are used together in the main structural elements. Examples include buildings which utilize: steel columns with a floor system of reinforced concrete beams; a steel frame system with a concrete core; concrete-encased steel columns; concrete-filled steel tubes; etc. Where known, the CTBUH database breaks out the materials used in a composite building’s core, columns, and floor spanning separately.

composite

Core
Reinforced Concrete
Columns
Steel
Floor Spanning
Steel
Height
Architectural
Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

306.0 m / 1,004 ft

To Tip
Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).
306.0 m / 1,004 ft
Occupied
Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest occupied floor within the building.
244.3 m / 802 ft
Observatory
244.3 m / 802 ft
Floors Above Ground
The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

73

Floors Below Ground
The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

3

# of Apartments
Number of Apartments refers to the total number of residential units (including both rental units and condominiums) contained within a particular building.

10

# of Hotel Rooms
Number of Hotel Rooms refers to the total number of hotel rooms contained within a particular building.

202

# of Elevators
Number of Elevators refers to the total number of elevator cars (not shafts) contained within a particular building (including public, private and freight elevators).

44

Top Elevator Speed
Top Elevator Speed refers to the top speed capable of being achieved by an elevator within a particular building, measured in meters per second.

6 m/s

Tower GFA
Tower GFA refers to the total gross floor area within the tower footprint, not including adjoining podiums, connected buildings or other towers within the development.

127,489 m² / 1,372,280 ft²

Rankings
#
158
Tallest in the World
#
7
Tallest in Europe
#
1
Tallest in United Kingdom
#
1
Tallest in London
#
73
Tallest Mixed-use Building in the World
#
5
Tallest Mixed-use Building in Europe
#
1
Tallest Mixed-use Building in United Kingdom
#
1
Tallest Mixed-use Building in London
#
94
Tallest Composite Building in the World
#
3
Tallest Composite Building in Europe
#
1
Tallest Composite Building in United Kingdom
#
1
Tallest Composite Building in London
Construction Schedule
2000

Proposed

2009

Construction Start

2013

Completed

Architect
Architect of Record

Usually takes on the balance of the architectural effort not executed by the "Design Architect," typically responsible for the construction documents, conforming to local codes, etc. May often be referred to as "Executive," "Associate," or "Local" Architect, however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Architect of Record" exclusively.

Structural Engineer
Design

The Design Engineer is usually involved in the front end design, typically taking the leadership role in the Schematic Design and Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

MEP Engineer
Design

The Design Engineer is usually involved in the front end design, typically taking the leadership role in the Schematic Design and Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Other Consultant

Other Consultant refers to other organizations which provided significant consultation services for a building project (e.g. wind consultants, environmental consultants, fire and life safety consultants, etc).

Acoustics
Façade

These are firms that consult on the design of a building's façade. May often be referred to as "Cladding," "Envelope," "Exterior Wall," or "Curtain Wall" Consultant, however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Façade Consultant" exclusively.

Geotechnical
Planning
Quantity Surveyor
Traffic
Wind
Material Supplier

Material Supplier refers to organizations which supplied significant systems/materials for a building project (e.g. elevator suppliers, facade suppliers, etc).

Construction Hoists
Elevator
Façade Maintenance Equipment
Owner
London Bridge Quarter Ltd
Developer
Sellar Property Group
Architect
Design

Usually involved in the front end design, with a "typical" condition being that of a leadership role through either Schematic Design or Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Renzo Piano Building Workshop
Architect of Record

Usually takes on the balance of the architectural effort not executed by the "Design Architect," typically responsible for the construction documents, conforming to local codes, etc. May often be referred to as "Executive," "Associate," or "Local" Architect, however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Architect of Record" exclusively.

Structural Engineer
Design

The Design Engineer is usually involved in the front end design, typically taking the leadership role in the Schematic Design and Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

MEP Engineer
Design

The Design Engineer is usually involved in the front end design, typically taking the leadership role in the Schematic Design and Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Project Manager

The CTBUH lists a project manager when a specific firm has been commissioned to oversee this aspect of a tall building’s design/construction. When the project management efforts are handled by the developer, main contract, or architect, this field will be omitted.

Turner & Townsend
Contractor
Main Contractor

The main contractor is the supervisory contractor of all construction work on a project, management of sub-contractors and vendors, etc. May be referred to as "Construction Manager," however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Main Contractor" exclusively.

Mace Limited
Other Consultant

Other Consultant refers to other organizations which provided significant consultation services for a building project (e.g. wind consultants, environmental consultants, fire and life safety consultants, etc).

Acoustics
Façade

These are firms that consult on the design of a building's façade. May often be referred to as "Cladding," "Envelope," "Exterior Wall," or "Curtain Wall" Consultant, however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Façade Consultant" exclusively.

Façade Maintenance
REEF Associates Ltd
Geotechnical
Fugro; WSP Group
Marketing
Wordsearch
Planning
Property Management
Real Estate Management Limited
Quantity Surveyor
Security
Kroll Inc
Traffic
Vertical Transportation
Lerch Bates Europe
Wind
Material Supplier

Material Supplier refers to organizations which supplied significant systems/materials for a building project (e.g. elevator suppliers, facade suppliers, etc).

Concrete
Byrne Group PLC
Construction Hoists
Elevator
Façade Maintenance Equipment
Paint/Coating
AkzoNobel
Steel
Severfield

CTBUH Awards & Distinctions

Best Tall Building Europe 2013 Winner

2013 CTBUH Awards

Videos

30 October 2017 | London

Interview: Steve Watts

Steve Watts of alinea consulting and CTBUH Chairman-Elect is interviewed by Chris Bentley during the 2017 CTBUH Australia Conference.

Research

01 July 2018

Towards Resource-Generative Skyscrapers

Mohamed Imam & Branko Kolarevic, University of Calgary

Rapid urbanization, resource depletion, and limited land are further increasing the need for skyscrapers in city centers; therefore, it is imperative to enhance tall building...

Global News

30 July 2020

CTBUH In The Media: The Future of Skyscrapers: A Mile High, Slimmer Than Ever and Made from Wood

History does not want for dizzying fantasies of tall buildings. From the Tower of Babel onwards, humanity has dreamed of ever-more wondrous skyscrapers, whether we...

About The Shard

The iconic tower has redefined the London skyline and is already an international symbol for London. A mixed-use “vertical city,” it offers more than 55,000 square meters of office space on 25 floors, three floors of restaurants, a 17-story hotel, 13 floors of apartments and a triple-height viewing gallery, as well as an open-air viewing floor on level 72. It is crowned with a steel-framed pinnacle and clad with shards of glass designed to blend into the sky. Standing next to London Bridge Station, one of London’s busiest transport hubs, at the heart of London Bridge Quarter, London’s newest commercial quarter, the Shard is a key part of the regeneration of London’s South Bank.

The name “The Shard” is derived from the architect’s description of the development as a “shard of glass” during planning stages. Its design was influenced by the irregular nature of the site.

The tapered form of the building provides efficient and economic floor design, with optimally sized floor plates conducive to its function as a multi-use development. Thus, offices on the lower floor make use of large open plan spaces with minimal structural intrusion, while the upper floors suit the uses of the hotel rooms and apartments, which require smaller floor plates. Moving further up into the spire, steel beams and columns with elegantly detailed connections help create an aesthetic, open space for the public to appreciate the views.

Matching the structure to the different uses allowed efficient use of materials, reducing both cost and the amount of embodied carbon on the project. It also maximized the net lettable area for the client.

Delivering Europe’s tallest tower in record time drove structural engineers and contractors to rethink the basic principles of construction and use new techniques to go higher and faster than had been conducted in the UK previously. To overcome the challenges of building a skyscraper safely in central London, adjacent to a major transport hub, the team delivered a number of firsts: the first core to be built by top-down construction, the UK’s largest concrete pour, the first use of jump-lift construction, the first inclined hoist in the world, and the first crane to be supported on a slipform. A specially designed laster-guided drilling rig was used to surgically place pilings among Victorian-era underground utilities and ancient archaelogical finds. Top-down construction allowed the first 23 stories of the concrete core and much of the surrounding tower to be built before the basement had been fully excavated. This technique was a world first and saved four months on the complex program.

The distinct tapering form is achieved in five structural parts. From basement level three to the 72nd floor there is a reinforced concrete core. The first 40 floors are a composite steel frame, while a post-tension concrete frame runs up to level 60, with a traditional reinforced concrete frame taking the project to level 72. The spire, to level 87, is made of steel. The mixture of concrete and steel increased the efficiency of the structure. The design negated the need for expensive tuned mass dampers by building the hotel and apartment levels in concrete, sandwiched between the steel office floors and spire.

Post-tensioned concrete was more suitable for the smaller spans higher up the building and saved 550 millimeters per floor. The concrete also provided structural damping, thus saving money and weight and releasing a further two floors as lettable space. In addition, fabricated uniform-depth steel beams acting compositely with the concrete floor slabs optimized the space in the ceilings for services.

The Shard is intended to regenerate and energize South London. The development promotes sustainable travel by including only 48 car parking spaces and features a major refurbishment of the adjacent London Bridge station, which handles 54 million passengers a day.

CTBUH Awards & Distinctions

Best Tall Building Europe 2013 Winner

2013 CTBUH Awards

30 October 2017 | London

Interview: Steve Watts

Steve Watts of alinea consulting and CTBUH Chairman-Elect is interviewed by Chris Bentley during the 2017 CTBUH Australia Conference.

19 October 2016 | London

From San Diego to Guangzhou: The Story of Marketing Tall Buildings

One of the keys to attracting buyers and tenants for a contemporary tall building is a succinct marketing strategy and a robust understanding of how...

27 October 2015 | London

Europe's Tallest: The Shard

London is considered one of the world’s safest harbors for investment capital. However, it has also been one of the lightning rods in the rapidly...

27 October 2015 | London

2015 New York Conference - Plenary 2 - Q&A

H.E. Abdulrahman Al-Shaikh, MOMRA; Mounib Hammoud, Jeddah Economic Company; Irvine Sellar, Sellar Property Group; and Sorapoj Techakraisri, PACE Development, answer questions at the end of...

27 October 2015 | London

Interview: Irvine Sellar

Irvine Sellar of Sellar Property is interviewed by Chris Bentley during the 2015 CTBUH New York Conference at the Grand Hyatt New York. Irvine discusses...

16 September 2014 | London

Blades of Steel: Understanding the Limits of Metal Façade Design

Metal claddings frequently skin our tall buildings. They provide the texture and shine that help distinguish one glass tower from the next. Like the fabric...

07 November 2013 | London

Best Tall Building Europe: The Shard: Building Europe’s Tallest

The winner of the Best Tall Building Europe award, The Shard is both heroic on the skyline and beautifully executed at the scale of the...

07 November 2013 | London

CTBUH 12th Annual Awards Dinner

The 12th Annual Awards Ceremony & Dinner was held in Mies van der Rohe's iconic Crown Hall, on the Illinois Institute of Technology campus, Chicago....

07 November 2013 | London

Interview: The Shard

Dave Elder and Bill Price discuss The Shard, the Best Tall Building Europe Winner. They discuss the lengthy process of designing the building and then...

12 June 2013 | London

Interview: The Shard

Irvine Sellar of Sellar Property is interviewed by Jeff Herzer during the 2013 CTBUH London Conference at The Brewery, London. Irvine talks about the process...

01 July 2018

Towards Resource-Generative Skyscrapers

Mohamed Imam & Branko Kolarevic, University of Calgary

Rapid urbanization, resource depletion, and limited land are further increasing the need for skyscrapers in city centers; therefore, it is imperative to enhance tall building...

04 February 2016

The Other Side of Tall Buildings: The Urban Habitat

Daniel Safarik, CTBUH

A growing number of tall buildings recognized by the CTBUH, through its international awards programs and research, are noteworthy not so much because of their...

26 October 2015

Developing an Icon – The Story of the Shard

Irvine Sellar, Sellar Property Group

London is considered one of the world’s safest harbors for investment capital. However, it has also been one of the lightning rods in the rapidly...

31 December 2013

Year in Review: Tall Trends of 2013

Daniel Safarik, Antony Wood, Marty Carver & Marshall Gerometta, CTBUH

By all appearances, the small increase in the total number of tall-building completions from 2012 into 2013 is indicative of a return to the prevalent...

12 June 2013

From “Dry and Safe” to “Tall and Sharp” / Owning an Icon

Kent Gardner, Evans Randall

The owners of two of London’s most significant skyscrapers, Irvine Sellar of the Shard and Kent Gardner of the Gherkin, spoke with CTBUH about the...

01 June 2013

The Past, Present and Future of the European Skyscraper

CTBUH Research

There are currently 109 skyscrapers over 150 meters in Europe. This number is set to jump to 161 by the end of 2015, meaning that...

01 May 2013

Engineering Tall in Historic Cities: The Shard

Kamran Moazami & Ron Slade, WSP

Can historic cities preserve their character and identity while embracing the modern tall building phenomenon? Two engineering-team leaders behind the Shard discuss the creative solutions...

13 January 2013

The Shard, London, UK

As the tallest skyscraper in Western Europe, The Shard takes its name from the four shards of the doubleglazed glass façade set at various angles,...

27 April 2012

Debating Tall: Is UNESCO Going Too Far?

Paul Finch, Architectural Review and UK Design Council; Marie-Noel Tournoux & Patricia Alberth, UNESCO World Heritage Centre

Controversy has erupted over development proposals in London and Liverpool in the UK, which UNESCO says will damage views of World Heritage sites. Critics counter...

01 January 2010

Sustainability and the Tall Building: Recent Developments and Future Trends

Mir M. Ali & Paul Armstrong, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

As a major energy consumer, the tall building does not ordinarily conjure images of sustainable design. But a new generation of tall buildings is incorporating...

30 July 2020

CTBUH In The Media: The Future of Skyscrapers: A Mile High, Slimmer Than Ever and Made from Wood

History does not want for dizzying fantasies of tall buildings. From the Tower of Babel onwards, humanity has dreamed of ever-more wondrous skyscrapers, whether we...

27 March 2019

Tulip Tower Set for City of London Approval

City of London planning officers have recommended approval for Foster + Partners’ opinion-splitting Tulip on a site next to the Gherkin. The planned 305-meter-tall tourist...

6 December 2018

CTBUH CEO Antony Wood traveled to his native UK for a speaking and listening tour, including a keynote address and several dinners with key figures of the tall building industry.

24 March 2018

The CTBUH Trustees from Chicago, New York, London, Mumbai, and Hong Kong gathered to attend the main annual Trustees meeting.

26 June 2017

CTBUH UK Learns About "A Day in the Life of The Shard"

An audience of 100 streamed into the Warwick Business School on the 17th floor of the Shard, to hear about the challenges of operating the tallest building in Western Europe.

22 May 2015

Inaugural Japan Symposium Rises to the Occasion in Tokyo

CTBUH held its inaugural Japan Symposium at the Academy Hills lecture hall of the Mori Tower in Roppongi Hills, bringing together leading experts

1 January 2014

The Shard Chosen as Featured Building

The developers of The Shard showed remarkable tenacity in bringing it to fruition.

31 December 2013

CTBUH Releases Year in Review: Tall Trends of 2013

By all appearances, the small increase in the total number of tall-building completions from 2012 into 2013 is indicative of a return to the prevalent trend of increasing completions each year over the past decade.

7 November 2013

The Shard Receives Best Tall Building Europe 2013 Honor

The Shard was recognized as the "Best Tall Building Europe" in the 2013 CTBUH Awards Program with presentations by Dave Elder and Bill Price from WSP Group.

1 June 2013

CTBUH Releases Study on the Past, Present and Future of the European Skyscraper

There are currently 109 skyscrapers over 150 meters in Europe. This number is set to jump to 161 by the end of 2015, meaning that there are more than 50 projects in advanced stages of construction.

17 July 2011

London Report: Bucking a Western Trend?

Executive Director Antony Wood visited the UK in July for the inaugural meeting of a future CTBUH UK Chapter and other endeavors.

23 January 2011

Shard London Bridge Visit

While in London, CTBUH’s Jan Klerks took the opportunity to visit the city's future tallest building; the Shard London Bridge, currently rising next to London Bridge Station.