10
Global
Height rank
TAIPEI 101
Taipei China
Height

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

1
To Tip:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).

508 m / 1,667 ft
2
Architectural:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

508 m / 1,667 ft
3
Occupied:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest occupied floor within the building.

438 m / 1,437 ft
1 2 3 TAIPEI 101 Outline
Floors

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

101
Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

5
Height 508 m / 1,667 ft
Floors 101
Official Name

The current legal building name.

TAIPEI 101
Type

CTBUH collects data on two major types of tall structures: 'Buildings' and 'Telecommunications / Observation Towers.' A 'Building' is a structure where at least 50% of the height is occupied by usable floor area. A 'Telecommunications / Observation Tower' is a structure where less than 50% of the structure's height is occupied by usable floor area. Only 'Buildings' are eligible for the CTBUH 'Tallest Buildings' lists.

Building
Status
Completed
Architecturally Topped Out
Structurally Topped Out
Under Construction
Proposed
On Hold
Never Completed
Vision
Competition Entry
Canceled
Proposed Renovation
Under Renovation
Renovated
Under Demolition
Demolished
Completed, 2004
Country/Region
Taiwan
City

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of City, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

Postal Code
110
Function

A single-function tall building is defined as one where 85% or more of its usable floor area is dedicated to a single usage. Thus a building with 90% office floor area would be said to be an "office" building, irrespective of other minor functions it may also contain.

A mixed-use tall building contains two or more functions (or uses), where each of the functions occupy a significant proportion of the tower's total space. Support areas such as car parks and mechanical plant space do not constitute mixed-use functions. Functions are denoted on CTBUH "Tallest Building" lists in descending order, e.g., "hotel/office" indicates hotel function above office function.

office
Structural Material

Steel
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from steel. Note that a building of steel construction with a floor system of concrete planks or concrete slab on top of steel beams is still considered a “steel” structure as the concrete elements are not acting as the primary structure.

Reinforced Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from concrete which has been cast in place and utilizes steel reinforcement bars.

Precast Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning system are constructed from steel reinforced concrete which has been precast as individual components and assembled together on-site.

Mixed-Structure
Utilizes distinct systems (e.g. steel, concrete, timber), one on top of the other. For example, a steel/concrete indicates a steel structural system located on top of a concrete structural system, with the opposite true of concrete/steel.

Composite
A combination of materials (e.g. steel, concrete, timber) are used together in the main structural elements. Examples include buildings which utilize: steel columns with a floor system of reinforced concrete beams; a steel frame system with a concrete core; concrete-encased steel columns; concrete-filled steel tubes; etc. Where known, the CTBUH database breaks out the materials used in a composite building’s core, columns, and floor spanning separately.

composite
LEED Platinum O+M: Existing Buildings
Official Website
Height

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

Architectural
508 m / 1,667 ft
To Tip
508 m / 1,667 ft
Occupied
438 m / 1,437 ft
Observatory
391.8 m / 1,285 ft
Floors Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

101
Floors Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

5
# of Parking Spaces

Number of Parking Spaces refers to the total number of car parking spaces contained within a particular building.

1839
# of Elevators

Number of Elevators refers to the total number of elevator cars (not shafts) contained within a particular building (including public, private and freight elevators).

61
16.83 m/s
Tower GFA

Tower GFA refers to the total gross floor area within the tower footprint, not including adjoining podiums, connected buildings or other towers within the development.

198,347 m² / 2,134,989 ft²
Rankings
#
10
Tallest in the World
#
7
Tallest in Asia
#
6
Tallest in China
#
1
Tallest in Taipei
#
4
Tallest Office Building in the World
#
3
Tallest Office Building in Asia
#
3
Tallest Office Building in China
#
1
Tallest Office Building in Taipei
#
8
Tallest Composite Building in the World
#
7
Tallest Composite Building in Asia
#
6
Tallest Composite Building in China
#
1
Tallest Composite Building in Taipei
Construction Schedule
1997

Proposed

1999

Construction Start

2004

Completed

2009

Retrofit Start

2011

Retrofit End

Architect
Structural Engineer
MEP Engineer
Continental Engineering Consultants, Inc.
Lehr Engineering
Turner International LLC
Kumagai Gumi; RSEA Engineering; Samsung C&T Corporation; Ta-You-Wei Construction; Taiwan Kumagai

Acoustics

Shen Milsom Wilke, Inc.

Building Monitoring

Damping

RWDI; ITT Enidine

Landscape

Genius Loci

LEED

EcoTech International; Siemens Building Technology; SL+A International Asia

Lighting

Theo Kondos

Marketing

Wordsearch

Sustainability

EcoTech International; Siemens Building Technology; SL+A International Asia

Vertical Transportation

Wind

(not specified)

Motioneering

Construction Hoists

Alimak Hek

Elevator

Toshiba Elevator and Building Systems Corporation (TELC)

Façade Maintenance Equipment

Fire Proofing

Grace Construction Products

HVAC

Carrier; York

Paint/Coating

Sealants

Dow Corning Corporation

Steel

China Steel Corporation; Nippon Steel & Sumitomo Metal Corporation

CTBUH Awards & Distinctions

Performance Award 2016 Winner

2016 CTBUH Awards

CTBUH Initiatives

CTBUH Study Examines Tallest Buildings with Dampers


22 August 2018 - CTBUH Research

TAIPEI 101 Hosts "Global Tall: Trends, Drivers and Challenges"


28 June 2018 - Event

See more

Videos

03 November 2016 | Taipei

Perhaps what is most notable about the TAIPEI 101 performance upgrade is not its complexity, but rather that the tower was already relatively efficient. All...

See more

Research

20 March 2020

CTBUH Research

In the first edition of the 2012 Journal, CTBUH published a Tall Buildings in Numbers study titled Tallest 20 in 2020: Era of the Megatall—The...

See more

Global News

09 August 2019 | Taipei

The tuned mass damper in the Taipei 101 skyscraper moved 15 centimeters due to an earthquake early Thursday, 8 August, according to the building management....

About TAIPEI 101

Standing in the Xinyi District of Taipei, an area known for its financial services and vibrant shopping malls, TAIPEI 101 represents a worldwide precedent for sustainable skyscraper development. It achieved a LEED Platinum certification for Operations and Maintenance in 2011, an impressive feat for a tower of its size and complexity.

The tower rises from its base in a series of eight-story modules that flare outward, evoking the form of a Chinese pagoda. The top of each module houses mechanical floors that accommodate garbage systems, ventilation equipment, water storage, and MEP services. Near the top, a smaller tower caps the structure, forming a pinnacle that has become a familiar sight for the city. The façade of the tower features double-paned green glass curtain walls that are highly reflective and block solar heat gain by 50 percent. Other sustainable features include energy efficient luminaries, custom lighting controls, low-flow water fixtures, and a smart Energy Management and Control System.

TAIPEI 101 contains a 728-ton tuned mass damper (TMD), a large spherical steel pendulum that offsets lateral movements caused by strong winds. The TMD is located in a large multi-story cavity near the top of the tower. This location is ideal for countering overturning forces, a necessary precaution in a typhoon-prone part of the world.

Nearly every aspect of the building’s design is steeped in symbolism. The number “100” symbolizes perfection and “100 plus 1” represents further breakthrough and innovation, and the new beginning. After completion, the building has become a central component of New Year’s celebrations in Taiwan. Every year, all of the tower’s lights are turned off and each of the stacked modules light up in sequential order, counting down the last eight seconds before the New Year, which is followed by a dazzling fireworks display.

CTBUH Awards & Distinctions

Performance Award 2016 Winner

2016 CTBUH Awards

Quick Facts

03 November 2016 | Taipei

Perhaps what is most notable about the TAIPEI 101 performance upgrade is not its complexity, but rather that the tower was already relatively efficient. All...

03 November 2016 | Taipei

Joseph Chou and Freda Tsai, Taipei Financial Center Corporation, are interviewed by Chris Bentley regarding TAIPEI 101 in Taipei, Taiwan, the recipient of the 2016...

19 October 2016 | Taipei

One of the keys to attracting buyers and tenants for a contemporary tall building is a succinct marketing strategy and a robust understanding of how...

17 October 2016 | Taipei

Monday October 17, 2016. Shenzhen, China. Joseph Chu, Taipei Financial Center Corporation, presents at the 2016 China Conference Session 3c: Building Operation. The sheer size...

17 October 2016 | Taipei

Monday, October 17, 2016. Shenzhen, China. Tim Neal, Arcadis; Samuel So, JLL; Joseph Chou, Taipei Financial Center Corporation; Zhao Ming Wang, CCDI answer questions at...

17 October 2016 | Taipei

Freda Tsai of Taipei Financial Center Corporation is interviewed by Chris Bentley during the 2016 CTBUH China Conference. Freda discusses the retrofit and management strategy...

20 March 2020

CTBUH Research

In the first edition of the 2012 Journal, CTBUH published a Tall Buildings in Numbers study titled Tallest 20 in 2020: Era of the Megatall—The...

30 January 2020

CTBUH Research

In 2019, 126 buildings of 200 meters’ height or greater were completed. This was a 13.7 percent decrease from 146 in 2018. The total number...

28 October 2019

Richard Lee, C.Y. Lee & Partners Architects/ Planners

While Western aesthetics dominate the world at this time, the rise of the East has led China to reexamine its Eurocentric view towards aesthetics. China...

11 October 2019

CTBUH Research

The default image of the skyscraper for the past 50 years in the public imagination has likely been the extruded, rectilinear corporate “box,” derived from...

31 January 2019

CTBUH Research

In 2018, 143 buildings of 200 meters’ height or greater were completed. This is a slight decrease from 2017’s record-breaking total of 147, and it...

30 July 2018

CTBUH Research

As tall buildings continue to be built in seismically-active and cyclone-prone areas, the need to augment the structures of these buildings with dynamic modification devices...

09 August 2019 | Taipei

The tuned mass damper in the Taipei 101 skyscraper moved 15 centimeters due to an earthquake early Thursday, 8 August, according to the building management....

22 August 2018

CTBUH Study Examines Tallest Buildings with Dampers

CTBUH has released a Tall Buildings in Numbers (TBIN) interactive data study on the world's tallest buildings with dampers.

28 June 2018

TAIPEI 101 Hosts "Global Tall: Trends, Drivers and Challenges"

TAIPEI 101 hosted the CTBUH Executive Director for a presentation investigating the challenges of skyscrapers' contribution to the creation of sustainable vertical cities.

12 September 2017

Vertical Transportation: Ascent & Acceleration

CTBUH partnered with Guinness World Records to identify the commercial building with the fastest elevator speeds and longest vertical runs.

5 July 2017

Asia Pacific Seminar Series

CTBUH Singapore, in coordination with CTBUH Malaysia and CTBUH Thailand, hosted a multi-city seminar on sustainable design in Singapore, Kuala Lumpur, and Bangkok.

4 November 2016

The CTBUH Awards Jury named Shanghai Tower, Shanghai as the “2016 Best Tall Building Worldwide” at the 15th Annual CTBUH Awards Ceremony and Dinner.

13 October 2016

The Council is pleased to announce the Top Company Rankings for numerous disciplines as derived from the list of projects appearing in 100 of the World’s Tallest Buildings.