53
Global
Height rank
Bank of China Tower
Hong Kong
Height

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

1
To Tip:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).

367.4 m / 1,205 ft
2
Architectural:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

367.4 m / 1,205 ft
3
Occupied:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest occupied floor within the building.

288.3 m / 946 ft
1 2 3 Bank of China Tower Outline
Floors

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

72
Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

4
Height 367.4 m / 1,205 ft
Floors 72
Official Name

The current legal building name.

Bank of China Tower
Type

CTBUH collects data on two major types of tall structures: 'Buildings' and 'Telecommunications / Observation Towers.' A 'Building' is a structure where at least 50% of the height is occupied by usable floor area. A 'Telecommunications / Observation Tower' is a structure where less than 50% of the structure's height is occupied by usable floor area. Only 'Buildings' are eligible for the CTBUH 'Tallest Buildings' lists.

Building
Status
Completed
Architecturally Topped Out
Structurally Topped Out
Under Construction
Proposed
On Hold
Never Completed
Vision
Competition Entry
Canceled
Proposed Renovation
Under Renovation
Renovated
Under Demolition
Demolished
Completed, 1990
Country

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of Country, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

City

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of City, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

Function

A single-function tall building is defined as one where 85% or more of its usable floor area is dedicated to a single usage. Thus a building with 90% office floor area would be said to be an "office" building, irrespective of other minor functions it may also contain.

A mixed-use tall building contains two or more functions (or uses), where each of the functions occupy a significant proportion of the tower's total space. Support areas such as car parks and mechanical plant space do not constitute mixed-use functions. Functions are denoted on CTBUH "Tallest Building" lists in descending order, e.g., "hotel/office" indicates hotel function above office function.

office
Structural Material

Steel
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from steel. Note that a building of steel construction with a floor system of concrete planks or concrete slab on top of steel beams is still considered a “steel” structure as the concrete elements are not acting as the primary structure.

Reinforced Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from concrete which has been cast in place and utilizes steel reinforcement bars.

Precast Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning system are constructed from steel reinforced concrete which has been precast as individual components and assembled together on-site.

Mixed-Structure
Utilizes distinct systems (e.g. steel, concrete, timber), one on top of the other. For example, a steel/concrete indicates a steel structural system located on top of a concrete structural system, with the opposite true of concrete/steel.

Composite
A combination of materials (e.g. steel, concrete, timber) are used together in the main structural elements. Examples include buildings which utilize: steel columns with a floor system of reinforced concrete beams; a steel frame system with a concrete core; concrete-encased steel columns; concrete-filled steel tubes; etc. Where known, the CTBUH database breaks out the materials used in a composite building’s core, columns, and floor spanning separately.

composite
Core
Reinforced Concrete
Columns
Reinforced Concrete
Floor Spanning
Steel
Official Website
Height

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

Architectural
367.4 m / 1,205 ft
To Tip
367.4 m / 1,205 ft
Occupied
288.34 m / 946 ft
Floors Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

72
Floors Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

4
# of Parking Spaces

Number of Parking Spaces refers to the total number of car parking spaces contained within a particular building.

370
# of Elevators

Number of Elevators refers to the total number of elevator cars (not shafts) contained within a particular building (including public, private and freight elevators).

49
Tower GFA

Tower GFA refers to the total gross floor area within the tower footprint, not including adjoining podiums, connected buildings or other towers within the development.

135,000 m² / 1,453,128 ft²
Rankings
#
53
Tallest in the World
#
34
Tallest in Asia
#
28
Tallest in China
#
4
Tallest in Hong Kong
#
19
Tallest Office Building in the World
#
12
Tallest Office Building in Asia
#
9
Tallest Office Building in China
#
3
Tallest Office Building in Hong Kong
#
35
Tallest Composite Building in the World
#
32
Tallest Composite Building in Asia
#
27
Tallest Composite Building in China
#
3
Tallest Composite Building in Hong Kong
Construction Schedule
1977

Proposed

1985

Construction Start

1990

Completed

Owner
Bank of China Hong Kong
Developer
Bank of China
Architect
Kung & Lee Architects Ltd.
Structural Engineer
Valentine, Laurie, and Davis
MEP Engineer
Associated Consulting Engineers
Sun Chung Building Management
Contractor
Hong Kong Construction (Holdings) Limited; Kumagai Gumi

Security

Peter McLaughlin Associates

Traffic

Travers Associates

Vertical Transportation

Way Finding

Peter X (+C) Inc.

Ceiling

Armstrong World Industries

Cladding

Builders Federal Limited; Josef Gartner & Co

Construction Hoists

Elevator

Otis Elevator Company; Mitsubishi Elevator and Escalator

Façade Maintenance Equipment

Fire Proofing

Grace Construction Products

HVAC

Shin Nippon Lanka (Pvt) Ltd.

Steel

Nippon Steel & Sumitomo Metal Corporation

Videos

20 October 2016 | Hong Kong

Thursday October 20, 2016. Hong Kong, China. Eric Ma of Hong Kong Special Administrative Region presents at the 2016 China Conference Plenary 6: Hong Kong...

Research

28 December 2019

SawTeen See, Robert Bird Group Pty Ltd

Aerodynamic damping through the use of vertical long slots reduces the dynamic component of the wind loads on the building. Seminal examples include the three-legged...

About Bank of China Tower

Arguably one of Hong Kong’s most distinctive buildings, Bank of China Tower is situated in the center of the city’s skyline. At the ground level, the tower is set back from the street to create an inviting pedestrian environment that is convenient, yet secluded from urban congestion. It is surrounded by a broad promenade, and flanked by cooling water gardens intended to muffle the noise of nearby traffic. The building is known for its observation deck on the 43rd floor, which offers unique views of the city from its central vantage point.

The architects were challenged to design a distinctive regional headquarters with a grand banking hall and office space, its use divided between the bank’s operations and tenant leasing. Another challenge in designing the building was to execute the building at the required height, with the added difficulties of building on a site in a typhoon zone, and keeping within fairly tight budget constraints. The solution, involving both creative architecture and engineering, involves an asymmetrical tower that addresses both skyline and street.

Designers looked to the form of bamboo shoots—as symbols of strength, growth, and prosperity—for inspiration. The tower is comprised of four vertical shafts; it emerges from a 52-meter cube and diminishes its mass incrementally, quadrant by quadrant, until a single triangular prism remains. The faceted prism is clad in reflective glass that mirrors the changing sky.

The whole structure is supported by five steel columns at the corners of the building, with the triangular frameworks transferring the weight of the structure onto these five columns. This innovative composite structural system not only resists high-velocity winds, but also realized significant savings in construction time and materials.

Quick Facts

20 October 2016 | Hong Kong

Thursday October 20, 2016. Hong Kong, China. Eric Ma of Hong Kong Special Administrative Region presents at the 2016 China Conference Plenary 6: Hong Kong...

28 December 2019

SawTeen See, Robert Bird Group Pty Ltd

Aerodynamic damping through the use of vertical long slots reduces the dynamic component of the wind loads on the building. Seminal examples include the three-legged...

01 December 2016

Kheir Al-Kodmany, University of Illinois; Mir M. Ali, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

There is much architectural and engineering literature which discusses the virtues of exterior bracing and diagrid systems in regards to sustainability - two systems which...

13 October 2016

The Council is pleased to announce the Top Company Rankings for numerous disciplines as derived from the list of projects appearing in 100 of the World’s Tallest Buildings.

25 February 2016

CITAB and CTBUH are pleased to announce the award recipients for the inaugural CITAB-CTBUH 2016 China Tall Building Awards.

29 April 2007

CTBUH / Nakheel Asia Tour Report

CTBUH collaborated with the Dubai-based developer Nakheel and architects Woods Bagot to facilitate a 5-nation tour of seminal tall buildings in south-east Asia.