1036
Global
Height rank

DC Tower I

Vienna
Height
1
To Tip:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).

250 m / 820 ft
2
Architectural:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

220 m / 722 ft
3
Occupied:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest occupied floor within the building.

211.2 m / 693 ft
1 2 3 DC Tower I Outline
Floors
Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

60
Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

4
Height 220.0 m / 722 ft
Floors 60
Official Name
The current legal building name.

DC Tower I

Other Names
Other names the building has commonly been known as, including former names, common informal names, local names, etc.

Danube City Tower 1

Name of Complex
A complex is a group of buildings which are designed and built as pieces of a greater development.

DC Towers

Type
CTBUH collects data on two major types of tall structures: 'Buildings' and 'Telecommunications / Observation Towers.' A 'Building' is a structure where at least 50% of the height is occupied by usable floor area. A 'Telecommunications / Observation Tower' is a structure where less than 50% of the structure's height is occupied by usable floor area. Only 'Buildings' are eligible for the CTBUH 'Tallest Buildings' lists.

Building

Status
Completed
Architecturally Topped Out
Structurally Topped Out
Under Construction
Proposed
On Hold
Never Completed
Vision
Competition Entry
Canceled
Proposed Renovation
Under Renovation
Renovated
Under Demolition
Demolished

Completed

Completion

2013

Country
The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of Country, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

Austria

City
The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of City, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

Vienna

Function
A single-function tall building is defined as one where 85% or more of its usable floor area is dedicated to a single usage. Thus a building with 90% office floor area would be said to be an "office" building, irrespective of other minor functions it may also contain.

A mixed-use tall building contains two or more functions (or uses), where each of the functions occupy a significant proportion of the tower's total space. Support areas such as car parks and mechanical plant space do not constitute mixed-use functions. Functions are denoted on CTBUH "Tallest Building" lists in descending order, e.g., "hotel/office" indicates hotel function above office function.

residential / office / hotel

Structural Material
Steel
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from steel. Note that a building of steel construction with a floor system of concrete planks or concrete slab on top of steel beams is still considered a “steel” structure as the concrete elements are not acting as the primary structure.

Reinforced Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from concrete which has been cast in place and utilizes steel reinforcement bars.

Precast Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning system are constructed from steel reinforced concrete which has been precast as individual components and assembled together on-site.

Mixed-Structure
Utilizes distinct systems (e.g. steel, concrete, timber), one on top of the other. For example, a steel/concrete indicates a steel structural system located on top of a concrete structural system, with the opposite true of concrete/steel.

Composite
A combination of materials (e.g. steel, concrete, timber) are used together in the main structural elements. Examples include buildings which utilize: steel columns with a floor system of reinforced concrete beams; a steel frame system with a concrete core; concrete-encased steel columns; concrete-filled steel tubes; etc. Where known, the CTBUH database breaks out the materials used in a composite building’s core, columns, and floor spanning separately.

concrete

Official Website

DC Towers

Height
Architectural
Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

220.0 m / 722 ft

To Tip
Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).
250.0 m / 820 ft
Occupied
Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest occupied floor within the building.
211.2 m / 693 ft
Observatory
207.0 m / 679 ft
Floors Above Ground
The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

60

Floors Below Ground
The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

4

# of Apartments
Number of Apartments refers to the total number of residential units (including both rental units and condominiums) contained within a particular building.

16

# of Hotel Rooms
Number of Hotel Rooms refers to the total number of hotel rooms contained within a particular building.

253

# of Parking Spaces
Number of Parking Spaces refers to the total number of car parking spaces contained within a particular building.

254

# of Elevators
Number of Elevators refers to the total number of elevator cars (not shafts) contained within a particular building (including public, private and freight elevators).

29

Top Elevator Speed
Top Elevator Speed refers to the top speed capable of being achieved by an elevator within a particular building, measured in meters per second.

8 m/s

Tower GFA
Tower GFA refers to the total gross floor area within the tower footprint, not including adjoining podiums, connected buildings or other towers within the development.

93,500 m² / 1,006,426 ft²

Rankings
#
1036
Tallest in the World
#
36
Tallest in Europe
#
1
Tallest in Austria
#
1
Tallest in Vienna
#
303
Tallest Mixed-use Building in the World
#
14
Tallest Mixed-use Building in Europe
#
1
Tallest Mixed-use Building in Austria
#
1
Tallest Mixed-use Building in Vienna
#
496
Tallest Concrete Building in the World
#
23
Tallest Concrete Building in Europe
#
1
Tallest Concrete Building in Austria
#
1
Tallest Concrete Building in Vienna
Construction Schedule
2002

Proposed

2010

Construction Start

2013

Completed

Structural Engineer
(not specified)
Other Consultant

Other Consultant refers to other organizations which provided significant consultation services for a building project (e.g. wind consultants, environmental consultants, fire and life safety consultants, etc).

Façade

These are firms that consult on the design of a building's façade. May often be referred to as "Cladding," "Envelope," "Exterior Wall," or "Curtain Wall" Consultant, however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Façade Consultant" exclusively.

Material Supplier

Material Supplier refers to organizations which supplied significant systems/materials for a building project (e.g. elevator suppliers, facade suppliers, etc).

Damper
Elevator
Owner/Developer
Wiener Entwicklungsgesellschaft für den Donauraum AG
Architect
(not specified)
Dominique Perrault Architecture; Hoffmann-Janz Architekten
Structural Engineer
(not specified)
Bollinger + Grohmann; Gmeiner Haferl Zivilingenieure ZT GmbH
MEP Engineer
(not specified)
AXIS Ingenieursleistungen ZT GmbH; Eipeldauer & Partner GmbH; ZFG-Projekt GmbH
Contractor
Main Contractor

The main contractor is the supervisory contractor of all construction work on a project, management of sub-contractors and vendors, etc. May be referred to as "Construction Manager," however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Main Contractor" exclusively.

Max Bögl Bauunternehmung GmbH & Co; STRABAG AG
Other Consultant

Other Consultant refers to other organizations which provided significant consultation services for a building project (e.g. wind consultants, environmental consultants, fire and life safety consultants, etc).

Civil
Dr. Pfeiler GmbH; ELIN GmbH & co KG; OK Osadnik & Kamienski GmbH; Stahlform Baustahlbearbeitungs GmbH; Vermessung Angst ZT GmbH; YIT Austria GmbH
Façade

These are firms that consult on the design of a building's façade. May often be referred to as "Cladding," "Envelope," "Exterior Wall," or "Curtain Wall" Consultant, however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Façade Consultant" exclusively.

Fire
Prüfstelle für Brandschutztechnik
Material Supplier

Material Supplier refers to organizations which supplied significant systems/materials for a building project (e.g. elevator suppliers, facade suppliers, etc).

Cladding
STRABAG AG
Concrete
Steinindustrie
Damper
Elevator
Eipeldauer & Partner GmbH; KONE; Hilti AG
Fire Suppression
Marioff Corporation Oy
Rebar
Kamper Handwerk + Bau GmbH; Linder GmbH

CTBUH Awards & Distinctions

Best Tall Building Europe 2014 Award of Excellence

2014 CTBUH Awards

Research

17 October 2016

Real-Time Controlled TMD of Danube City Tower

Felix Weber, Peter Huber, Hans Distl & Christian Braun, MAURER AG

Since 2014, a MAURER controlled TMD has mitigated the first bending mode of the Danube City Tower in Vienna, Austria. It consists of a pendulum...

About DC Tower I

Austria’s DC Tower 1 has become an invaluable landmark of the Donau-city in Vienna. The building comprises an entirely new urban district with a diverse range of functions: offices, a four star hotel, apartments, a sky bar, a public open space, restaurants, and a fitness center. The folds contrast with the no-nonsense rigor of the other three façades, creating a tension that electrifies the public space at the tower’s base. The façade’s folds give the tower a liquid, immaterial character, a malleability constantly adapting to the light, a reflection or an event. Dancing on its platform, the tower is slightly oriented toward the river to open a dialogue with the rest of the city, turning its back on no one, neither the historic nor the new Vienna. A subtle game of flat and folded façades affords the glass and steel tower a sensual identity.

The aim of the designers was to get the basic horizontality of the city and the public space to coincide with vertical trajectories. On the back façade, the public space rises from the level of the esplanade in a series of staggered steps to reach the ground reference plane. This structuring of topography launches the tower and creates a spatial interface accessible to all, making the occurrence of such a physical object both possible and acceptable. On the other three façades, 54 metallic umbrellas gradually rise from the ground on the approach, softening the hard edges of the project and blending city and movement into the tower’s future. Important work on neighborhood fringes remains to be done to reveal the geographic features of this urban landscape and take better advantage of the river bank.

With this first substantial tower, the city of Vienna has demonstrated that the punctual and controlled emergence of high-rises can participate in creating the city and produce contemporary, economical, high-energy performance mixed-use buildings, adapted to metropolitan business requirements and lifestyles.

In each office, openings provide natural fresh air. The curtain walls are composed of three different glass layers, so as to provide solar protection.

Active floors, used to a large extent in the tower, minimize energy consumption by reducing the volume of air flow to exactly match the thermodynamic heat load. Water recycled from the adjacent Danube River is used for the cooling process.

At the bottom of the tower, the connected building is provided with photovoltaic roofing and thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), which serve to insulate components from large and prolonged heat loads by utilizing thermally insulating materials, which can sustain an appreciable temperature difference between the load-bearing alloys and the coating surface.

Moreover, on the square, large sunshade screens made of perforated black panels provide shelter for pedestrians and act as wind breakers as well. Some of these umbrellas on the lower square are planned to become supports for plantings, in the second development phase, supported by an automatic watering system. The project is in the process of obtaining LEED Gold certification.

CTBUH Awards & Distinctions

Best Tall Building Europe 2014 Award of Excellence

2014 CTBUH Awards

17 October 2016

Real-Time Controlled TMD of Danube City Tower

Felix Weber, Peter Huber, Hans Distl & Christian Braun, MAURER AG

Since 2014, a MAURER controlled TMD has mitigated the first bending mode of the Danube City Tower in Vienna, Austria. It consists of a pendulum...

26 October 2015

The Vienna Donau City Tower – 2000mm Flat Slabs as Outrigger Structure for Unique Landmark Building

Klaus Bollinger, Manfred Grohmann & Alexander Berger, Bollinger + Grohmann

The Donau City Tower I, with an architectural height of 220m, has become Austria’s tallest skyscraper, and is the new landmark building in Vienna’s skyline....