106
Global
Height rank

Longxi International Hotel

Wuxi
Height
1
To Tip:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).

328 m / 1,076 ft
2
Architectural:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

328 m / 1,076 ft
3
Occupied:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest occupied floor within the building.

315 m / 1,033 ft
1 2 3 Longxi International Hotel Outline
Floors
Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

72
Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

2
Height 328.0 m / 1,076 ft
Floors 72
Official Name
The current legal building name.

Longxi International Hotel

Other Names
Other names the building has commonly been known as, including former names, common informal names, local names, etc.

Farmer's Apartments, Huaxi Tower, Hanging Village of Huaxi

Type
CTBUH collects data on two major types of tall structures: 'Buildings' and 'Telecommunications / Observation Towers.' A 'Building' is a structure where at least 50% of the height is occupied by usable floor area. A 'Telecommunications / Observation Tower' is a structure where less than 50% of the structure's height is occupied by usable floor area. Only 'Buildings' are eligible for the CTBUH 'Tallest Buildings' lists.

Building

Status
Completed
Architecturally Topped Out
Structurally Topped Out
Under Construction
Proposed
On Hold
Never Completed
Vision
Competition Entry
Canceled
Proposed Renovation
Under Renovation
Renovated
Under Demolition
Demolished

Completed

Completion

2011

Country
The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of Country, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

China

City
The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of City, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

Wuxi

Function
A single-function tall building is defined as one where 85% or more of its usable floor area is dedicated to a single usage. Thus a building with 90% office floor area would be said to be an "office" building, irrespective of other minor functions it may also contain.

A mixed-use tall building contains two or more functions (or uses), where each of the functions occupy a significant proportion of the tower's total space. Support areas such as car parks and mechanical plant space do not constitute mixed-use functions. Functions are denoted on CTBUH "Tallest Building" lists in descending order, e.g., "hotel/office" indicates hotel function above office function.

residential / hotel

Structural Material
Steel
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from steel. Note that a building of steel construction with a floor system of concrete planks or concrete slab on top of steel beams is still considered a “steel” structure as the concrete elements are not acting as the primary structure.

Reinforced Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from concrete which has been cast in place and utilizes steel reinforcement bars.

Precast Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning system are constructed from steel reinforced concrete which has been precast as individual components and assembled together on-site.

Mixed-Structure
Utilizes distinct systems (e.g. steel, concrete, timber), one on top of the other. For example, a steel/concrete indicates a steel structural system located on top of a concrete structural system, with the opposite true of concrete/steel.

Composite
A combination of materials (e.g. steel, concrete, timber) are used together in the main structural elements. Examples include buildings which utilize: steel columns with a floor system of reinforced concrete beams; a steel frame system with a concrete core; concrete-encased steel columns; concrete-filled steel tubes; etc. Where known, the CTBUH database breaks out the materials used in a composite building’s core, columns, and floor spanning separately.

composite

Core
Reinforced Concrete
Columns
Concrete Filled Steel
Floor Spanning
Steel
Height
Architectural
Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

328.0 m / 1,076 ft

To Tip
Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).
328.0 m / 1,076 ft
Occupied
Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest occupied floor within the building.
315.0 m / 1,033 ft
Observatory
315.0 m / 1,033 ft
Floors Above Ground
The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

72

Floors Below Ground
The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

2

# of Elevators
Number of Elevators refers to the total number of elevator cars (not shafts) contained within a particular building (including public, private and freight elevators).

35

Top Elevator Speed
Top Elevator Speed refers to the top speed capable of being achieved by an elevator within a particular building, measured in meters per second.

10 m/s

Rankings
#
106
Tallest in the World
#
66
Tallest in Asia
#
56
Tallest in China
#
2
Tallest in Wuxi
#
55
Tallest Mixed-use Building in the World
#
41
Tallest Mixed-use Building in Asia
#
36
Tallest Mixed-use Building in China
#
2
Tallest Mixed-use Building in Wuxi
#
64
Tallest Composite Building in the World
#
55
Tallest Composite Building in Asia
#
50
Tallest Composite Building in China
#
2
Tallest Composite Building in Wuxi
Construction Schedule
2007

Construction Start

2011

Completed

Material Supplier

Material Supplier refers to organizations which supplied significant systems/materials for a building project (e.g. elevator suppliers, facade suppliers, etc).

Architect
Design

Usually involved in the front end design, with a "typical" condition being that of a leadership role through either Schematic Design or Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

A+E Design
Material Supplier

Material Supplier refers to organizations which supplied significant systems/materials for a building project (e.g. elevator suppliers, facade suppliers, etc).

CTBUH Initiatives

Vertical Transportation: Ascent & Acceleration

12 September 2017 - CTBUH Research

CTBUH Releases Year in Review: Tall Trends of 2011

31 December 2011 - CTBUH Journal

Research

25 April 2019

Tall Buildings in Numbers: World's Tallest Offset-Core Buildings

CTBUH Research

There has long been an interest in separating the service cores of tall buildings from the main programmed areas – to create more column-free, easily-configured...

About Longxi International Hotel

Opened on the same day the local Hauxi Village celebrated its 50th anniversary, Longxi International Hotel became an internationally publicized icon of the village’s rapid growth. The once rural farming village has transitioned into a far more urban setting and the local government considered building vertically as means to continue growth while preserving remaining undeveloped lands. Partial financing for the tower was provided by 200 villagers through purchasing shares in the building for 10 million yuan each, an investment which entitles each shareholder to revenues earned from the building’s operations.

The construction of the tower was viewed as method of increasing tourism to the village while also improving the local quality of life. The tower contains a hotel with more than 800 suites as well as an exhibition hall, gardens, swimming pool and on the 60th floor, a statue of an ox created with one ton of gold.

The tower rises from a petal shaped podium as three large cylindrical towers, inspired by a cluster of bamboo and was arranged around an open void reminiscent of a traditional courtyard flanked by buildings. The tower’s interior was then anticipated to function as a series of interlocking architectural features in the implied form of a traditional village layout with homes, streets and gardens vertically extruded skyward. The open arraignment around the interior void also then provides for maximizing view sightlines in all directions. The tower is then topped with large golden sphere housing one of the world’s highest revolving restaurants serving guests with panoramic views of the largely low-rise surroundings.

25 April 2019

Tall Buildings in Numbers: World's Tallest Offset-Core Buildings

CTBUH Research

There has long been an interest in separating the service cores of tall buildings from the main programmed areas – to create more column-free, easily-configured...

31 December 2011

Year in Review: Tall Trends of 2011

Nathaniel Hollister & Antony Wood, CTBUH

The annual story is becoming a familiar one: 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, and now 2011 have each sequentially broke the record for the most 200...

12 September 2017

Vertical Transportation: Ascent & Acceleration

CTBUH partnered with Guinness World Records to identify the commercial building with the fastest elevator speeds and longest vertical runs.

31 December 2011

CTBUH Releases Year in Review: Tall Trends of 2011

The annual story is becoming a familiar one: 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, and now 2011 have each sequentially broke the record for the most 200 meter or higher buildings completed in a given year. Once again, more 200 m+ buildings were completed in 2011 than in any year previous.