195
Global
Height rank
One Island East
Hong Kong China
Height

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

1
To Tip:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).

298.1 m / 978 ft
2
Architectural:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

298.1 m / 978 ft
3
Occupied:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest occupied floor within the building.

285.2 m / 936 ft
1 2 3 One Island East Outline
Floors

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

68
Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

2
Height 298.1 m / 978 ft
Floors 68
Official Name

The current legal building name.

One Island East
Name of Complex

A complex is a group of buildings which are designed and built as pieces of a greater development.

Type

CTBUH collects data on two major types of tall structures: 'Buildings' and 'Telecommunications / Observation Towers.' A 'Building' is a structure where at least 50% of the height is occupied by usable floor area. A 'Telecommunications / Observation Tower' is a structure where less than 50% of the structure's height is occupied by usable floor area. Only 'Buildings' are eligible for the CTBUH 'Tallest Buildings' lists.

Building
Status
Completed
Architecturally Topped Out
Structurally Topped Out
Under Construction
Proposed
On Hold
Never Completed
Vision
Competition Entry
Canceled
Proposed Renovation
Under Renovation
Renovated
Under Demolition
Demolished
Completed, 2008
Country

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of Country, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

City

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of City, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

Function

A single-function tall building is defined as one where 85% or more of its usable floor area is dedicated to a single usage. Thus a building with 90% office floor area would be said to be an "office" building, irrespective of other minor functions it may also contain.

A mixed-use tall building contains two or more functions (or uses), where each of the functions occupy a significant proportion of the tower's total space. Support areas such as car parks and mechanical plant space do not constitute mixed-use functions. Functions are denoted on CTBUH "Tallest Building" lists in descending order, e.g., "hotel/office" indicates hotel function above office function.

office
Structural Material

Steel
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from steel. Note that a building of steel construction with a floor system of concrete planks or concrete slab on top of steel beams is still considered a “steel” structure as the concrete elements are not acting as the primary structure.

Reinforced Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from concrete which has been cast in place and utilizes steel reinforcement bars.

Precast Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning system are constructed from steel reinforced concrete which has been precast as individual components and assembled together on-site.

Mixed-Structure
Utilizes distinct systems (e.g. steel, concrete, timber), one on top of the other. For example, a steel/concrete indicates a steel structural system located on top of a concrete structural system, with the opposite true of concrete/steel.

Composite
A combination of materials (e.g. steel, concrete, timber) are used together in the main structural elements. Examples include buildings which utilize: steel columns with a floor system of reinforced concrete beams; a steel frame system with a concrete core; concrete-encased steel columns; concrete-filled steel tubes; etc. Where known, the CTBUH database breaks out the materials used in a composite building’s core, columns, and floor spanning separately.

concrete
BEAM Platinum
Official Website
Height

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

Architectural
298.1 m / 978 ft
To Tip
298.1 m / 978 ft
Occupied
285.23 m / 936 ft
Floors Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

68
Floors Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

2
# of Elevators

Number of Elevators refers to the total number of elevator cars (not shafts) contained within a particular building (including public, private and freight elevators).

37
Tower GFA

Tower GFA refers to the total gross floor area within the tower footprint, not including adjoining podiums, connected buildings or other towers within the development.

142,792 m² / 1,537,000 ft²
Rankings
#
195
Tallest in the World
#
117
Tallest in Asia
#
98
Tallest in China
#
7
Tallest in Hong Kong
#
75
Tallest Office Building in the World
#
50
Tallest Office Building in Asia
#
45
Tallest Office Building in China
#
5
Tallest Office Building in Hong Kong
#
62
Tallest Concrete Building in the World
#
18
Tallest Concrete Building in Asia
#
7
Tallest Concrete Building in China
#
3
Tallest Concrete Building in Hong Kong
Owner
One Island East Limited
Architect
Wong & Ouyang
Structural Engineer
MEP Engineer
Gammon Construction Limited
Hugh Dutton Associes; Permasteelisa Group

Aluminium

Ceiling

Armstrong World Industries

CTBUH Initiatives

Hong Kong Regional Tour Report


20 September 2014 - Building Tour

Hong Kong & Shenzhen Tour Report: Touring Two Tall Cities


22 September 2012 - Building Tour

See more

Videos

20 October 2016 | Hong Kong

Thursday October 20, 2016. Hong Kong, China. Eric Ma of Hong Kong Special Administrative Region presents at the 2016 China Conference Plenary 6: Hong Kong...

See more

Research

17 October 2016

CTBUH 2016 Conference Speakers

The CTBUH 2016 International Conference is being held in the three cities of the Pearl River Delta, the world’s largest “megacity,” projected to have 120...

See more

About One Island East

One Island East comprises 59 office floors with a typical floor plate of 2,300 square meters (24,760 square feet). One Island East is the landmark of Taikoo Place, recognized as one of the Hong Kong’s best planned business hubs, managed by Swire Properties. The portfolio offers some 6 million sq ft of prime commercial space for local and multinational corporations.

The basic form of the building is a square plan with rounded corners and a central core. The two corners facing north and south open up at the top floors to address the Harbor view. At the base, the two corners facing east and west open up to address the open space. The edges of the four façades sail beyond, creating a floating effect and giving lightness to the building. Architectural fins are introduced on the façade in a staggered pattern to add texture and scale.

Without a podium structure, the tower sits freely in front of a large landscaped open space to the east. The canopy at the porte cohere is specially designed as a piece of sculpture. The landscaped area beyond is designed to have platforms at different levels incorporating water features. This urban landscape gives an appropriate scale as a forecourt to the building and provides a leisure space for both the enjoyment of office workers and for the neighborhood.

The upper main lobby is connected to the rest of the office complex at TaiKoo Place via a bridge at the northwest corner. Through a well-established system of link bridges at the existing podium level, pedestrians can gain convenient access to the MTR Quarry Bay Station. The One Island East building not only energizes the whole of TaiKoo Place, it also plays a leading role in transforming the neighborhood into a better environment.

20 October 2016 | Hong Kong

Thursday October 20, 2016. Hong Kong, China. Eric Ma of Hong Kong Special Administrative Region presents at the 2016 China Conference Plenary 6: Hong Kong...

17 October 2016 | Hong Kong

In the age of the multi-million inhabitant city, the concept of a single, concentrated Central Business District is increasingly becoming unsustainable. As we are seeing...

17 October 2016

CTBUH 2016 Conference Speakers

The CTBUH 2016 International Conference is being held in the three cities of the Pearl River Delta, the world’s largest “megacity,” projected to have 120...

17 October 2016

Tim Balckburn, Swire Properties

In the age of the multi-million inhabitant city, the traditional concept of a single Central Business District (CBD) is becoming increasingly unrealistic. As we are...

31 December 2008

CTBUH Research

Against the backdrop of global economic crisis, 2008 witnessed the most successful year of skyscraper construction to date, with more skyscrapers constructed globally within a...

20 September 2014

Hong Kong Regional Tour Report

The tour began at Hong Kong’s One Island East, a 298-meter office building. After a day of activity and touring, the tour ended with an evening harbor cruise, on a Chinese junk.

23 September 2012

Hong Kong & Shenzhen Tour Report: Touring Two Tall Cities

Delegates from the Congress flew to Hong Kong to visit one of the tallest cities in the world. The second day included a side trip to Shenzhen, including a private tour of KK100.

31 December 2008

CTBUH Releases Tallest Buildings Completed in 2008

Against the backdrop of global economic crisis, 2008 witnessed the most successful year of skyscraper construction to date, with more skyscrapers constructed globally within a single year than ever before and the average height of the tallest ten constructed in 2008 rising to 319 meters.