The Interlace
Singapore
Height
1
To Tip:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).

88.7 m / 291 ft
2
Architectural:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

88.7 m / 291 ft
3
Occupied:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest occupied floor within the building.

80.1 m / 263 ft
Floors
Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

24
Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

1
1 2 3 The Interlace Outline
Height 88.7 m / 291 ft
Floors 24
Official Name

The current legal building name.

The Interlace
Type

CTBUH collects data on two major types of tall structures: 'Buildings' and 'Telecommunications / Observation Towers.' A 'Building' is a structure where at least 50% of the height is occupied by usable floor area. A 'Telecommunications / Observation Tower' is a structure where less than 50% of the structure's height is occupied by usable floor area. Only 'Buildings' are eligible for the CTBUH 'Tallest Buildings' lists.

Building
Status
Completed
Architecturally Topped Out
Structurally Topped Out
Under Construction
Proposed
On Hold
Never Completed
Vision
Competition Entry
Canceled
Proposed Renovation
Under Renovation
Renovated
Under Demolition
Demolished
Completed, 2013
Country

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of Country, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

City

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of City, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

Function

A single-function tall building is defined as one where 85% or more of its usable floor area is dedicated to a single usage. Thus a building with 90% office floor area would be said to be an "office" building, irrespective of other minor functions it may also contain.

A mixed-use tall building contains two or more functions (or uses), where each of the functions occupy a significant proportion of the tower's total space. Support areas such as car parks and mechanical plant space do not constitute mixed-use functions. Functions are denoted on CTBUH "Tallest Building" lists in descending order, e.g., "hotel/office" indicates hotel function above office function.

residential
Structural Material

Steel
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from steel. Note that a building of steel construction with a floor system of concrete planks or concrete slab on top of steel beams is still considered a “steel” structure as the concrete elements are not acting as the primary structure.

Reinforced Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from concrete which has been cast in place and utilizes steel reinforcement bars.

Precast Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning system are constructed from steel reinforced concrete which has been precast as individual components and assembled together on-site.

Mixed-Structure
Utilizes distinct systems (e.g. steel, concrete, timber), one on top of the other. For example, a steel/concrete indicates a steel structural system located on top of a concrete structural system, with the opposite true of concrete/steel.

Composite
A combination of materials (e.g. steel, concrete, timber) are used together in the main structural elements. Examples include buildings which utilize: steel columns with a floor system of reinforced concrete beams; a steel frame system with a concrete core; concrete-encased steel columns; concrete-filled steel tubes; etc. Where known, the CTBUH database breaks out the materials used in a composite building’s core, columns, and floor spanning separately.

concrete
Official Website
Architectural

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

88.7 m / 291 ft
To Tip

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).

88.7 m / 291 ft
Occupied

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest occupied floor within the building.

80.1 m / 262.8 ft
Floors Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

24
Floors Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

1
# of Apartments

Number of Apartments refers to the total number of residential units (including both rental units and condominiums) contained within a particular building.

1040
# of Parking Spaces

Number of Parking Spaces refers to the total number of car parking spaces contained within a particular building.

1183
# of Elevators

Number of Elevators refers to the total number of elevator cars (not shafts) contained within a particular building (including public, private and freight elevators).

43
Tower GFA

Tower GFA refers to the total gross floor area within the tower footprint, not including adjoining podiums, connected buildings or other towers within the development.

170,000 m² / 1,829,865 ft²
Construction Schedule
2007

Proposed

2010

Construction Start

2013

Completed

Architect
Architect of Record

Usually takes on the balance of the architectural effort not executed by the "Design Architect," typically responsible for the construction documents, conforming to local codes, etc. May often be referred to as "Executive," "Associate," or "Local" Architect, however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Architect of Record" exclusively.

Other Consultant

Other Consultant refers to other organizations which provided significant consultation services for a building project (e.g. wind consultants, environmental consultants, fire and life safety consultants, etc).

Quantity Surveyor
Stormwater Management
Owner/Developer
CapitaLand Singapore Limited; Hotel Properties Limited
Architect
Design

Usually involved in the front end design, with a "typical" condition being that of a leadership role through either Schematic Design or Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Office for Metropolitan Architecture
Architect of Record

Usually takes on the balance of the architectural effort not executed by the "Design Architect," typically responsible for the construction documents, conforming to local codes, etc. May often be referred to as "Executive," "Associate," or "Local" Architect, however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Architect of Record" exclusively.

Structural Engineer
Design

The Design Engineer is usually involved in the front end design, typically taking the leadership role in the Schematic Design and Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

T.Y. Lin international
MEP Engineer
Design

The Design Engineer is usually involved in the front end design, typically taking the leadership role in the Schematic Design and Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Squire Mech Pte Ltd
Contractor
Main Contractor

The main contractor is the supervisory contractor of all construction work on a project, management of sub-contractors and vendors, etc. May be referred to as "Construction Manager," however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Main Contractor" exclusively.

Woh Hup Pte Ltd
Other Consultant

Other Consultant refers to other organizations which provided significant consultation services for a building project (e.g. wind consultants, environmental consultants, fire and life safety consultants, etc).

Acoustics
Acviron Acoustics Consultants Pte Ltd
Civil
T.Y. Lin international
Landscape
ICN Design International Pte. Ltd.; Office for Metropolitan Architecture
Lighting
Lighting Planners Associates
Quantity Surveyor
Stormwater Management

CTBUH Awards & Distinctions

Best Tall Building Asia & Australasia 2014 Award of Excellence

2014 CTBUH Awards

Urban Habitat Award 2014 Winner

2014 CTBUH Awards

CTBUH Initiatives

Master's Thesis Challenge

28 August 2017 - CTBUH News

Videos

06 November 2014 | Singapore

2014 Awards - Session 1 Q&A

Dr. Peter Irwin, Founding Partner, RWDI Consulting Engineers, Michael Adlerstein, Assistant Secretary-General & Executive Director, United Nations Capital Master Plan, John Gering, Managing Partner, HLW...

Research

01 July 2018

Exploring New Paradigms in High-Density Vertical Hybrids

Swinal Samant & Srilakshmi Menon, National University of Singapore

By the year 2050, the world population is set to increase to 9 billion people, of which 66% will be living in cities. It is...

About The Interlace

The Interlace is a apartment complex consisting of 31 apartment blocks stacked in hexagonal arrangements around eight large-scale, permeable courtyards. The stacking of the volumes creates a topographical phenomenon more reminiscent of a landscape than of a typical building. An extensive network of communal gardens and spaces is interwoven with amenities, providing multiple opportunities for social interaction, leisure and recreation – both on the roofs of, and in between, these stacked horizontal blocks.

Instead of following the default typology of housing in Singapore – clusters of isolated, vertical towers – the design generates an intricate network of living and social spaces integrated with the natural environment. The blocks are arranged on four main “Superlevels” with three “peaks." The unusual geometry of the hexagonally stacked building blocks creates a dramatic spatial structure. Partly resting, partly floating, the blocks hover on top of each other to form open, permeable courtyards that interconnect with one another and the surrounding landscape and city. An expressive, interlaced space emerges that connects the multiple parts of the development into an open, inclusive community.

Multi-story openings allow light and air to weave into the architecture and through the landscape of the eight courtyards at the heart of the project. The primary pedestrian route through the project leads residents from the main entrance to the courtyards as primary points of orientation and identification – one lives in a courtyard, or a space, as opposed to a “building” or an “object.” Pedestrian circulation is grouped and bundled according to the density of residents around each courtyard, by way of a central connector. A system of secondary footpaths brings residents on the most direct route from the connector to the front doors of their homes.

A system of three core types, of 6, 18, and 24 stories, respectively is located at the overlap of the stacked apartment blocks. Cores typically serve three to four units per floor, which provides efficient circulation without long corridors. Core lobbies are naturally lit and ventilated, bringing daylight and fresh air into common areas. Circular “mega-columns” arranged around the vertical circulation in an optimized hexagonal configuration enable the three-way rotation of the blocks and provide a standard solution for all conditions. The highly efficient system of compact cores, minimal circulation, and maximized floor area allowed the project to be realized on a budget for affordable housing, within the competitive context of Singapore's market.

A series of site-specific environmental studies – on wind, solar and daylight conditions – were carried out and evaluated to determine intelligent strategies for the building envelope and landscape design. Early and comprehensive incorporation of low-impact passive energy strategies has won the project Singapore's Green Mark Gold Plus Award.

All apartments receive ample levels of daylight throughout the day, while the unique massing of the project provides a sufficient level of self-shading in the courtyards, which helps maintain comfortable outdoor spaces year-round for communal use.

Water bodies have been strategically placed within defined wind corridors. This allows evaporative cooling to happen along wind paths, reducing local air temperatures and improving the thermal comfort of outdoor recreation spaces in strategic micro-climate zones.

Extensive balconies and protruding terraces form a cascading vertical landscape across the facades and further connect the green roofs and shared public terraces between the building volumes. Overall, the project appears not only surrounded by the tropical vegetation, but embedded within it.

All traffic and parking is accommodated in a single layer below the landscaped ground level. A large number of open-air voids allow light and air to reach the semi-sunken parking deck, creating areas of lush vegetation and trees below ground and connecting these spaces visually and through planting to the courtyards above.

The landscape design capitalizes on the generous size of the eight-hectare site and further maximizes the green area and presence of nature. By stacking the apartment blocks, the design has generated additional horizontal surfaces, and thus the opportunity for extensive roof gardens and numerous landscaped public terraces, which, in aggregate, provide even more overall green area than the size of the unbuilt site.

CTBUH Awards & Distinctions

Best Tall Building Asia & Australasia 2014 Award of Excellence

2014 CTBUH Awards

Urban Habitat Award 2014 Winner

2014 CTBUH Awards

Quick Facts

  • During the construction of this building, its designer and partner-in-charge at Office for Metropolitan Architecture (OMA), Ole Scheeren, left and founded his own firm, Buro Ole Scheeren. OMA and Ole Scheeren share the design credit for this project.

06 November 2014 | Singapore

2014 Awards - Session 1 Q&A

Dr. Peter Irwin, Founding Partner, RWDI Consulting Engineers, Michael Adlerstein, Assistant Secretary-General & Executive Director, United Nations Capital Master Plan, John Gering, Managing Partner, HLW...

06 November 2014 | Singapore

CTBUH 13th Annual Awards Dinner

The 13th Annual Awards Ceremony & Dinner was held in Mies van der Rohe's iconic Crown Hall, on the Illinois Institute of Technology campus, Chicago....

06 November 2014 | Singapore

CTBUH Urban Habitat Award: Rethinking the Urban Habitat: The Interlace

The Interlace is a apartment complex consisting of 31 apartment blocks stacked in hexagonal arrangements around eight large-scale, permeable courtyards. The stacking of the volumes...

06 November 2014 | Singapore

Interview: The Interlace

Tiang Wah Eng, Vice-President, Design Management, CapitaLand, and Ole Scheeren, Principal, Büro Ole Scheeren, are interviewed by Chris Bentley regarding the Best Tall Building Urban...

17 September 2014 | Singapore

Interview: Ole Scheeren

Ole Scheeren of Büro Ole Scheeren is interviewed by Chris Bentley during the 2014 CTBUH Shanghai Conference at the Jin Mao Tower. Ole talks about...

17 September 2014 | Singapore

Monthly Video: Five Minutes with Ole Scheeren

Ole Scheeren of Büro Ole Scheeren is interviewed by Chris Bentley during the 2014 CTBUH Shanghai Conference at the Jin Mao Tower. Ole talks about...

17 September 2014 | Singapore

Space Formations

As architecture keeps expanding vertically – with ever taller buildings to emerge across the world, and with the skyscraper having long become the predominant typology...

01 July 2018

Exploring New Paradigms in High-Density Vertical Hybrids

Swinal Samant & Srilakshmi Menon, National University of Singapore

By the year 2050, the world population is set to increase to 9 billion people, of which 66% will be living in cities. It is...

04 February 2016

The Other Side of Tall Buildings: The Urban Habitat

Daniel Safarik, CTBUH

A growing number of tall buildings recognized by the CTBUH, through its international awards programs and research, are noteworthy not so much because of their...

16 September 2014

Space Formations

Ole Scheeren, Büro Ole Scheeren

As architecture keeps expanding vertically – with ever taller buildings to emerge across the world, and with the skyscraper having long become the predominant typology...

28 August 2017

Master's Thesis Challenge

CTBUH is launching a new academic initiative, empowering Master's-level architecture students to research new possibilities in rope-less elevator technology.