The Leadenhall Building
London
Height

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

1
To Tip:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).

224 m / 735 ft
2
Architectural:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

224 m / 735 ft
3
Occupied:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest occupied floor within the building.

202.9 m / 666 ft
1 2 3 The Leadenhall Building Outline
Floors

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

52
Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

4
Height 224 m / 735 ft
Floors 52
Official Name

The current legal building name.

The Leadenhall Building
Other Names

Other names the building has commonly been known as, including former names, common informal names, local names, etc.

The Cheese Grater
Type

CTBUH collects data on two major types of tall structures: 'Buildings' and 'Telecommunications / Observation Towers.' A 'Building' is a structure where at least 50% of the height is occupied by usable floor area. A 'Telecommunications / Observation Tower' is a structure where less than 50% of the structure's height is occupied by usable floor area. Only 'Buildings' are eligible for the CTBUH 'Tallest Buildings' lists.

Building
Status
Completed
Architecturally Topped Out
Structurally Topped Out
Under Construction
Proposed
On Hold
Never Completed
Vision
Competition Entry
Canceled
Proposed Renovation
Under Renovation
Renovated
Under Demolition
Demolished
Completed, 2014
Country

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of Country, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

City

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of City, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

Postal Code
EC3V 4AB
Function

A single-function tall building is defined as one where 85% or more of its usable floor area is dedicated to a single usage. Thus a building with 90% office floor area would be said to be an "office" building, irrespective of other minor functions it may also contain.

A mixed-use tall building contains two or more functions (or uses), where each of the functions occupy a significant proportion of the tower's total space. Support areas such as car parks and mechanical plant space do not constitute mixed-use functions. Functions are denoted on CTBUH "Tallest Building" lists in descending order, e.g., "hotel/office" indicates hotel function above office function.

office
Structural Material

Steel
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from steel. Note that a building of steel construction with a floor system of concrete planks or concrete slab on top of steel beams is still considered a “steel” structure as the concrete elements are not acting as the primary structure.

Reinforced Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from concrete which has been cast in place and utilizes steel reinforcement bars.

Precast Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning system are constructed from steel reinforced concrete which has been precast as individual components and assembled together on-site.

Mixed-Structure
Utilizes distinct systems (e.g. steel, concrete, timber), one on top of the other. For example, a steel/concrete indicates a steel structural system located on top of a concrete structural system, with the opposite true of concrete/steel.

Composite
A combination of materials (e.g. steel, concrete, timber) are used together in the main structural elements. Examples include buildings which utilize: steel columns with a floor system of reinforced concrete beams; a steel frame system with a concrete core; concrete-encased steel columns; concrete-filled steel tubes; etc. Where known, the CTBUH database breaks out the materials used in a composite building’s core, columns, and floor spanning separately.

steel
BREEAM Excellent
Official Website
Height

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

Architectural
224 m / 735 ft
To Tip
224 m / 735 ft
Occupied
202.9 m / 666 ft
Floors Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

52
Floors Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

4
# of Parking Spaces

Number of Parking Spaces refers to the total number of car parking spaces contained within a particular building.

22
# of Elevators

Number of Elevators refers to the total number of elevator cars (not shafts) contained within a particular building (including public, private and freight elevators).

26
Tower GFA

Tower GFA refers to the total gross floor area within the tower footprint, not including adjoining podiums, connected buildings or other towers within the development.

84,424 m² / 908,732 ft²
Rankings
#
35
Tallest in Europe
#
6
Tallest in United Kingdom
#
6
Tallest in London
#
435
Tallest Office Building in the World
#
16
Tallest Office Building in Europe
#
4
Tallest Office Building in United Kingdom
#
4
Tallest Office Building in London
#
88
Tallest Steel Building in the World
#
5
Tallest Steel Building in Europe
#
3
Tallest Steel Building in United Kingdom
#
3
Tallest Steel Building in London
Construction Schedule
2001

Proposed

2011

Construction Start

2014

Completed

Owner

Current

CC Land

Past

Oxford Properties Group Inc.; The British Land Company PLC
Developer
The British Land Company PLC; Oxford Properties Group Inc.
Architect
Structural Engineer
MEP Engineer
WSP Group; M3 Consulting
Contractor
Laing O'Rourke

Fire

Exova Warringtonfire

Landscape

Edco Design London

Marketing

Wordsearch

Planning

DP9 Ltd

Urban Planner

Francis Golding

Cladding

Elevator

Paint/Coating

AkzoNobel

Sealants

Steel

Watson Steel

CTBUH Awards & Distinctions

Innovation Award 2014 Award of Excellence

2014 CTBUH Awards

Best Tall Building Europe 2015 Award of Excellence

2015 CTBUH Awards

CTBUH Initiatives

CTBUH UK Hosts Discussion: Protecting or Prohibiting?


22 May 2018 - Event

Canada Event Considers “The Story of Marketing Tall Buildings”


20 June 2017 - Event

Videos

30 October 2017 | London

Tall buildings have an important role in defining the character of the City and they help reduce urban sprawl. However, when a building rises above...

Research

25 April 2019

Dr. Philip Oldfield, UNSW Sydney; Bronte Doherty, BVN Architecture

This research explores the trends, drivers and frequency of offset cores in the world’s tallest buildings. It charts the history of tall building layouts, exploring...

30 October 2017 | London

Tall buildings have an important role in defining the character of the City and they help reduce urban sprawl. However, when a building rises above...

19 October 2016 | London

One of the keys to attracting buyers and tenants for a contemporary tall building is a succinct marketing strategy and a robust understanding of how...

12 June 2013 | London

Tall buildings, in congested city centers, often combine major civil, structural, and services challenges and opportunities. Construction can cause major noise and disruption to the...

12 June 2013 | London

Some sources predict that by 2050 the population will have reached nine billion; six to seven living in cities. This will be a generation of...

11 June 2013 | London

Angela Brady of RIBA is interviewed by Jeff Herzer during the 2013 CTBUH London Conference at The Brewery, London. Angela talks about the importance of...

11 June 2013 | London

Paul Monaghan of AHMM is interviewed by Jeff Herzer during the 2013 CTBUH London Conference at The Brewery, London. Paul talks about the identity of...

25 April 2019

Dr. Philip Oldfield, UNSW Sydney; Bronte Doherty, BVN Architecture

This research explores the trends, drivers and frequency of offset cores in the world’s tallest buildings. It charts the history of tall building layouts, exploring...

01 July 2018

Ivan Harbour, Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners

Critics of height argue that it de-humanizes our cities. Yet a critical mass is a necessity for vibrant city life, and height is a key...

01 December 2016

Terri Meyer Boake, University of Waterloo

The diagrid structural system for constructing tall buildings is a recent invention. Debuting in 2004 with the construction of the Swiss Re Tower in London,...

31 December 2014

Daniel Safarik, Antony Wood, Marty Carver & Marshall Gerometta, CTBUH

An All-Time Record 97 Buildings of 200 Meters or Higher Completed in 2014 and 2014 showed further shifts towards Asia, and also surprising developments in...

12 June 2013

Andy Young, Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners; Nigel Annereau, Arup; Andy Butler, Laing O’Rourke; Brian Smith, Davis Langdon

The Leadenhall Building leans back to make way for views to St. Paul’s Cathedral and other historic sites in a crowded section of the City...

05 November 2007

Watts, Steve; Kalita, Neal & Maclean, Michael, Davis Langdon

This paper addresses global economic factors infl uencing the decisions leading to the development of super-tall towers, including population growth and urbanization, economic cycles and...

22 May 2018

CTBUH UK Hosts Discussion: Protecting or Prohibiting?

The CTBUH UK Chapter held an event discussing the subject: “Are London’s Viewing Corridors Protecting or Prohibiting our City's Growth?"

20 June 2017

Canada Event Considers “The Story of Marketing Tall Buildings”

Building up momentum for the CTBUH 2017 Conference in Australia, the CTBUH Canada Chapter held its most recent event at the University of Toronto Faculty Club.

17 September 2015

Warm Weather Spaces Walking Tours 2015

The CTBUH Urban Habitat / Urban Design Committee organized guided walking tours of 16 cities around the globe, focusing on urban habitats around tall buildings.

29 July 2015

Ivan Harbour on Design Excellence

CTBUH Sydney welcomed Ivan Harbour, of Roger Stirk Harbour + Partners, to share his thoughts and experiences with international design excellence competitions.

22 May 2015

Inaugural Japan Symposium Rises to the Occasion in Tokyo

CTBUH held its inaugural Japan Symposium at the Academy Hills lecture hall of the Mori Tower in Roppongi Hills, bringing together leading experts

29 January 2015

Seven Cities Winter Spaces Walking Tour

The new CTBUH Urban Habitat / Urban Design Committee organized a highly successful Winter Spaces Walking Tour in seven cities around the world.