204
Global
Height rank
China World Trade Center Phase 3B
Beijing China
Height

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

1
To Tip:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).

295.6 m / 970 ft
2
Architectural:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

295.6 m / 970 ft
3
Occupied:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest occupied floor within the building.

259.9 m / 853 ft
1 2 3 China World Trade Center Phase 3B Outline
Floors

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

59
Height 295.6 m / 970 ft
Floors 59
Official Name

The current legal building name.

China World Trade Center Phase 3B
Name of Complex

A complex is a group of buildings which are designed and built as pieces of a greater development.

Type

CTBUH collects data on two major types of tall structures: 'Buildings' and 'Telecommunications / Observation Towers.' A 'Building' is a structure where at least 50% of the height is occupied by usable floor area. A 'Telecommunications / Observation Tower' is a structure where less than 50% of the structure's height is occupied by usable floor area. Only 'Buildings' are eligible for the CTBUH 'Tallest Buildings' lists.

Building
Status
Completed
Architecturally Topped Out
Structurally Topped Out
Under Construction
Proposed
On Hold
Never Completed
Vision
Competition Entry
Canceled
Proposed Renovation
Under Renovation
Renovated
Under Demolition
Demolished
Completed, 2017
Country

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of Country, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

City

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of City, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

Function

A single-function tall building is defined as one where 85% or more of its usable floor area is dedicated to a single usage. Thus a building with 90% office floor area would be said to be an "office" building, irrespective of other minor functions it may also contain.

A mixed-use tall building contains two or more functions (or uses), where each of the functions occupy a significant proportion of the tower's total space. Support areas such as car parks and mechanical plant space do not constitute mixed-use functions. Functions are denoted on CTBUH "Tallest Building" lists in descending order, e.g., "hotel/office" indicates hotel function above office function.

hotel / office
Structural Material

Steel
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from steel. Note that a building of steel construction with a floor system of concrete planks or concrete slab on top of steel beams is still considered a “steel” structure as the concrete elements are not acting as the primary structure.

Reinforced Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from concrete which has been cast in place and utilizes steel reinforcement bars.

Precast Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning system are constructed from steel reinforced concrete which has been precast as individual components and assembled together on-site.

Mixed-Structure
Utilizes distinct systems (e.g. steel, concrete, timber), one on top of the other. For example, a steel/concrete indicates a steel structural system located on top of a concrete structural system, with the opposite true of concrete/steel.

Composite
A combination of materials (e.g. steel, concrete, timber) are used together in the main structural elements. Examples include buildings which utilize: steel columns with a floor system of reinforced concrete beams; a steel frame system with a concrete core; concrete-encased steel columns; concrete-filled steel tubes; etc. Where known, the CTBUH database breaks out the materials used in a composite building’s core, columns, and floor spanning separately.

composite
LEED Gold
Height

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

Architectural
295.6 m / 970 ft
To Tip
295.6 m / 970 ft
Occupied
259.9 m / 853 ft
Floors Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

59
# of Hotel Rooms

Number of Hotel Rooms refers to the total number of hotel rooms contained within a particular building.

600
Tower GFA

Tower GFA refers to the total gross floor area within the tower footprint, not including adjoining podiums, connected buildings or other towers within the development.

225,806 m² / 2,430,556 ft²
Rankings
#
204
Tallest in the World
#
120
Tallest in Asia
#
100
Tallest in China
#
3
Tallest in Beijing
#
91
Tallest Mixed-use Building in the World
#
62
Tallest Mixed-use Building in Asia
#
53
Tallest Mixed-use Building in China
#
2
Tallest Mixed-use Building in Beijing
#
118
Tallest Composite Building in the World
#
97
Tallest Composite Building in Asia
#
90
Tallest Composite Building in China
#
3
Tallest Composite Building in Beijing
Construction Schedule
2012

Proposed

2013

Construction Start

2017

Completed

Architect
Structural Engineer
MEP Engineer
Parsons Brinckerhoff Consultants Private Limited

Marketing

Wordsearch

Quantity Surveyor

Cladding

Jangho Group Co., Ltd.

Fire Proofing

Grace Construction Products

Videos

19 September 2012 | Beijing

The rapid development of Chinese cities has provided unique opportunities to create architecture that either responds to its context or, in the case of emerging...

Research

05 February 2018

This 2017 Tall Building Year in Review / Tall Buildings in Numbers data analysis report shows that more buildings of 200 meters’ height or greater...

About China World Trade Center Phase 3B

On November 25, 2015, China World Trade Center topped out and Beijing’s new second tallest building at that time was now structurally at its peak. The mixed-use tower is the latest addition to the Beijing World Trade Center, a complex of buildings with varying heights developed since the 1980’s and containing a mix of shops, offices, hotels and apartments at the center Beijing’s Central Business District.

The tower was built as composite structure with a reinforced concrete core and a steel frame with perimeter columns encased in concrete. The structure rises with 8 perimeter columns on each side, which then reduces to 5 through a load transfer which vertically spans through three floors at the tower’s midpoint. The exterior is clad in a sleek curtain wall of glass with self-shading vertical fins and a canted façade tilting slightly inward. These façade features reduces glare and solar heat gain in the warm summer months, while still allowing for ample natural light in the winter and provides for the façade to have self-cleaning properties during periods of rainfall. The shape of the building is derived from forms found in nature such a bamboo shoot or a conch shell, but could also be viewed as a series of pagoda rooflines turned upside down. The curtain wall then extends well above the main roof line to complete the tower with a distinctive crown

Like the other buildings in the World Trade Center complex, this building is attached to a podium with a mix of uses aligned to the local streets and a series of plazas and open spaces. Phase 3B’s tapering form shows a design relationship to the neighboring China World Tower, also known as Phase 3A, and is the tallest in the complex. The pair of towers sits at the center of the emerging focal point of Beijing’s skyline in a highly visible location along the city’s 3rd Ring Road and across from the iconic CCTV Headquarters.

19 September 2012 | Beijing

The rapid development of Chinese cities has provided unique opportunities to create architecture that either responds to its context or, in the case of emerging...

05 February 2018

This 2017 Tall Building Year in Review / Tall Buildings in Numbers data analysis report shows that more buildings of 200 meters’ height or greater...