2496
Global
Height rank
Hearst Tower
New York City
Height
1
To Tip:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).

182 m / 597 ft
2
Architectural:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

182 m / 597 ft
1 2 Hearst Tower Outline
Floors
Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

46
Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

1
Height 182 m / 597 ft
Floors 46
Official Name

The current legal building name.

Hearst Tower
Other Names

Other names the building has commonly been known as, including former names, common informal names, local names, etc.

Hearst Magazine Tower
Type

CTBUH collects data on two major types of tall structures: 'Buildings' and 'Telecommunications / Observation Towers.' A 'Building' is a structure where at least 50% of the height is occupied by usable floor area. A 'Telecommunications / Observation Tower' is a structure where less than 50% of the structure's height is occupied by usable floor area. Only 'Buildings' are eligible for the CTBUH 'Tallest Buildings' lists.

Building
Status
Completed
Architecturally Topped Out
Structurally Topped Out
Under Construction
Proposed
On Hold
Never Completed
Vision
Competition Entry
Canceled
Proposed Renovation
Under Renovation
Renovated
Under Demolition
Demolished
Completed, 2006
Country

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of Country, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

City

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of City, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

Address
Postal Code
10019
Function

A single-function tall building is defined as one where 85% or more of its usable floor area is dedicated to a single usage. Thus a building with 90% office floor area would be said to be an "office" building, irrespective of other minor functions it may also contain.

A mixed-use tall building contains two or more functions (or uses), where each of the functions occupy a significant proportion of the tower's total space. Support areas such as car parks and mechanical plant space do not constitute mixed-use functions. Functions are denoted on CTBUH "Tallest Building" lists in descending order, e.g., "hotel/office" indicates hotel function above office function.

office
Structural Material

Steel
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from steel. Note that a building of steel construction with a floor system of concrete planks or concrete slab on top of steel beams is still considered a “steel” structure as the concrete elements are not acting as the primary structure.

Reinforced Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from concrete which has been cast in place and utilizes steel reinforcement bars.

Precast Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning system are constructed from steel reinforced concrete which has been precast as individual components and assembled together on-site.

Mixed-Structure
Utilizes distinct systems (e.g. steel, concrete, timber), one on top of the other. For example, a steel/concrete indicates a steel structural system located on top of a concrete structural system, with the opposite true of concrete/steel.

Composite
A combination of materials (e.g. steel, concrete, timber) are used together in the main structural elements. Examples include buildings which utilize: steel columns with a floor system of reinforced concrete beams; a steel frame system with a concrete core; concrete-encased steel columns; concrete-filled steel tubes; etc. Where known, the CTBUH database breaks out the materials used in a composite building’s core, columns, and floor spanning separately.

steel
Energy Label
LEED Platinum
Architectural

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

182 m / 597 ft
To Tip

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).

182 m / 597 ft
Floors Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

46
Floors Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

1
Tower GFA

Tower GFA refers to the total gross floor area within the tower footprint, not including adjoining podiums, connected buildings or other towers within the development.

79,524 m² / 855,989 ft²
Rankings
#
2496
Tallest in the World
#
426
Tallest in North America
#
1103
Tallest Office Building in the World
#
246
Tallest Office Building in North America
#
74
Tallest Office Building in New York City
#
225
Tallest Steel Building in the World
#
136
Tallest Steel Building in North America
#
126
Tallest Steel Building in United States
#
59
Tallest Steel Building in New York City
Construction Schedule
2000

Proposed

2003

Construction Start

2006

Completed

Architect
Design

Usually involved in the front end design, with a "typical" condition being that of a leadership role through either Schematic Design or Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Architect of Record

Usually takes on the balance of the architectural effort not executed by the "Design Architect," typically responsible for the construction documents, conforming to local codes, etc. May often be referred to as "Executive," "Associate," or "Local" Architect, however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Architect of Record" exclusively.

Structural Engineer
Design

The Design Engineer is usually involved in the front end design, typically taking the leadership role in the Schematic Design and Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

MEP Engineer
Design

The Design Engineer is usually involved in the front end design, typically taking the leadership role in the Schematic Design and Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Contractor
Main Contractor

The main contractor is the supervisory contractor of all construction work on a project, management of sub-contractors and vendors, etc. May be referred to as "Construction Manager," however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Main Contractor" exclusively.

Other Consultant

Other Consultant refers to other organizations which provided significant consultation services for a building project (e.g. wind consultants, environmental consultants, fire and life safety consultants, etc).

Cost
Environmental
Façade

These are firms that consult on the design of a building's façade. May often be referred to as "Cladding," "Envelope," "Exterior Wall," or "Curtain Wall" Consultant, however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Façade Consultant" exclusively.

Geotechnical
Interiors
Quantity Surveyor
Material Supplier

Material Supplier refers to organizations which supplied significant systems/materials for a building project (e.g. elevator suppliers, facade suppliers, etc).

Architect
Design

Usually involved in the front end design, with a "typical" condition being that of a leadership role through either Schematic Design or Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Architect of Record

Usually takes on the balance of the architectural effort not executed by the "Design Architect," typically responsible for the construction documents, conforming to local codes, etc. May often be referred to as "Executive," "Associate," or "Local" Architect, however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Architect of Record" exclusively.

Structural Engineer
Design

The Design Engineer is usually involved in the front end design, typically taking the leadership role in the Schematic Design and Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

MEP Engineer
Design

The Design Engineer is usually involved in the front end design, typically taking the leadership role in the Schematic Design and Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Contractor
Main Contractor

The main contractor is the supervisory contractor of all construction work on a project, management of sub-contractors and vendors, etc. May be referred to as "Construction Manager," however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Main Contractor" exclusively.

Other Consultant

Other Consultant refers to other organizations which provided significant consultation services for a building project (e.g. wind consultants, environmental consultants, fire and life safety consultants, etc).

Cost
Energy Concept
Vidaris, Inc.
Environmental
Façade

These are firms that consult on the design of a building's façade. May often be referred to as "Cladding," "Envelope," "Exterior Wall," or "Curtain Wall" Consultant, however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Façade Consultant" exclusively.

Vidaris, Inc.; Permasteelisa Group
Geotechnical
Interiors
Quantity Surveyor
Roofing
Vidaris, Inc.
Sustainability
Vidaris, Inc.
Material Supplier

Material Supplier refers to organizations which supplied significant systems/materials for a building project (e.g. elevator suppliers, facade suppliers, etc).

CTBUH Awards & Distinctions

Best Tall Sustainable Building 2007 Winner

2007 CTBUH Awards

10 Year Award 2016 Winner

2016 CTBUH Awards

Videos

03 November 2016 | New York City

Integrating Old with New: Hearst Tower

Sophisticated, distinctive, and transformative, Hearst Tower has profoundly impacted the skyscraper typology through its first decade of existence. Rarely has a tower so successfully integrated...

Research

01 March 2018

Dynamic Interrelationship between the Evolution of the Structural Systems and Façade Design in Tall Buildings

Kyoung Sun Moon, Yale University School of Architecture

The emergence of tall buildings in the late 19th century was possible by using new materials and separating the role of structures and that of...

Global News

06 May 2019 | New York City

Latest Plan for a New York City Supertall Revealed

Amidst the ongoing evolution of the Manhattan skyline, one of the most notable recent changes has been the completion of the Midtown East rezoning, which...

About Hearst Tower

Atop the hollowed shell of the landmark office building erected in 1928, The Hearst Headquarters became the first New York City commercial office building to achieve Gold LEED Certification from the US Green Building Council.

Using 26% less energy than a building constructed to normal code, the Hearst Headquarters features a distinct, thermal efficient diagrid design that provides an open interior with a panoramic view over Central Park. The building’s unique design saved 2,000 tons of steel, involved 90% of steel made from recycled material and required only 10% of all materials to be imported during construction, reducing overall cost and emissions.

A 14,000 gallon reclamation tank was introduced to recycle rainwater from the building’s rooftop to supplement cooling systems, water plant life and support the building’s innovative “Icefall” water feature that controls lobby temperature and humidity. The system reduces the tower’s sewer runoff by 25%.

Hearst’s additional “green” features include: variable air volume system, central air handling units on the 18th floor, temperature control units on each floor, radiant floors to heat the lobby, 100% outside air purge cycle for operational flexibility and post construction indoor air quality management, daylight sensors, humidity sensors and controls, low emissions materials, CO2 sensors for demand controlled ventilation and VOC sensors.

CTBUH Awards & Distinctions

Best Tall Sustainable Building 2007 Winner

2007 CTBUH Awards

10 Year Award 2016 Winner

2016 CTBUH Awards

03 November 2016 | New York City

Integrating Old with New: Hearst Tower

Sophisticated, distinctive, and transformative, Hearst Tower has profoundly impacted the skyscraper typology through its first decade of existence. Rarely has a tower so successfully integrated...

03 November 2016 | New York City

Interview: Hearst Tower

Louis Nowikas, Vice President, Hearst Corporation, is interviewed by Chris Bentley regarding the 2016 CTBUH Tall Building 10 Year Award Winner, the Hearst Tower, New...

05 March 2008 | New York City

Hearst Headquarters: Innovation and Heritage in Harmony

Bart Sullivan, WSP Cantor Seinuk, presented the new $500million Hearst Corporation headquarters at the CTBUH 8th World Congress in Dubai. This 46-story, 600 ft tall,...

03 March 2008 | New York City

Delivering Sustainable Tall Buildings

Michael Deane, Turner, talked about the role of the builder in delivering sustainable tall buildings at the CTBUH 8th World Congress in Dubai. Using projects...

25 October 2007 | New York City

CTBUH 6th Annual Awards

The CTBUH 6th Annual Awards Dinner, set within the atmospheric setting of Mies van der Rohe’s iconic Crown Hall at the Illinois Institute of Technology,...

01 March 2018

Dynamic Interrelationship between the Evolution of the Structural Systems and Façade Design in Tall Buildings

Kyoung Sun Moon, Yale University School of Architecture

The emergence of tall buildings in the late 19th century was possible by using new materials and separating the role of structures and that of...

01 December 2016

An Overview of Structural & Aesthetic Developments in Tall Buildings Using Exterior Bracing & Diagrid Systems

Kheir Al-Kodmany, University of Illinois; Mir M. Ali, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

There is much architectural and engineering literature which discusses the virtues of exterior bracing and diagrid systems in regards to sustainability - two systems which...

01 December 2016

Stability of Diagrid Structures

Ahmad Rahimian, WSP | Parsons Brinkerhoff

Efficiencies in the strength and stability of truss systems have been understood since the Middle Ages. The major impetus for widespread use of the truss...

01 December 2016

The Emergence of the Diagrid - It’s All About the Node

Terri Meyer Boake, University of Waterloo

The diagrid structural system for constructing tall buildings is a recent invention. Debuting in 2004 with the construction of the Swiss Re Tower in London,...

03 March 2008

Hearst Headquarters: Innovation and Heritage in Harmony

Ahmad Rahimian & Yoram Eilon, WSP Cantor Seinuk

This paper describes the challenges met in preserving the façade and how the choice of a diagrid system - a highly efficient triangulated truss tube...

06 May 2019 | New York City

Latest Plan for a New York City Supertall Revealed

Amidst the ongoing evolution of the Manhattan skyline, one of the most notable recent changes has been the completion of the Midtown East rezoning, which...

4 November 2016

The CTBUH Awards Jury named Shanghai Tower, Shanghai as the “2016 Best Tall Building Worldwide” at the 15th Annual CTBUH Awards Ceremony and Dinner.

22 June 2016

CTBUH is proud to announce the winners and finalists for the CTBUH 2016 Tall Building Awards, chosen from a pool of 132 submissions vying for recognition.

16 September 2014

Building Movement and Damping Workshop, Shanghai 2014

The Building Movement and Damping Technical Workshop reviewed some of the latest strategies and concepts for helping tall buildings avoid movement in seismic and wind events.