2246
Global
Height rank

One Madison Park

New York City
Height 189.3 m / 621 ft
Floors 50
Official Name
The current legal building name.

One Madison Park

Other Names
Other names the building has commonly been known as, including former names, common informal names, local names, etc.

The Saya

Type
CTBUH collects data on two major types of tall structures: 'Buildings' and 'Telecommunications / Observation Towers.' A 'Building' is a structure where at least 50% of the height is occupied by usable floor area. A 'Telecommunications / Observation Tower' is a structure where less than 50% of the structure's height is occupied by usable floor area. Only 'Buildings' are eligible for the CTBUH 'Tallest Buildings' lists.

Building

Status
Completed
Architecturally Topped Out
Structurally Topped Out
Under Construction
Proposed
On Hold
Never Completed
Vision
Competition Entry
Canceled
Proposed Renovation
Under Renovation
Renovated
Under Demolition
Demolished

Completed

Completion

2010

Country
The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of Country, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

United States

City
The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of City, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

New York City

Function
A single-function tall building is defined as one where 85% or more of its usable floor area is dedicated to a single usage. Thus a building with 90% office floor area would be said to be an "office" building, irrespective of other minor functions it may also contain.

A mixed-use tall building contains two or more functions (or uses), where each of the functions occupy a significant proportion of the tower's total space. Support areas such as car parks and mechanical plant space do not constitute mixed-use functions. Functions are denoted on CTBUH "Tallest Building" lists in descending order, e.g., "hotel/office" indicates hotel function above office function.

residential

Structural Material
Steel
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from steel. Note that a building of steel construction with a floor system of concrete planks or concrete slab on top of steel beams is still considered a “steel” structure as the concrete elements are not acting as the primary structure.

Reinforced Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from concrete which has been cast in place and utilizes steel reinforcement bars.

Precast Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning system are constructed from steel reinforced concrete which has been precast as individual components and assembled together on-site.

Mixed-Structure
Utilizes distinct systems (e.g. steel, concrete, timber), one on top of the other. For example, a steel/concrete indicates a steel structural system located on top of a concrete structural system, with the opposite true of concrete/steel.

Composite
A combination of materials (e.g. steel, concrete, timber) are used together in the main structural elements. Examples include buildings which utilize: steel columns with a floor system of reinforced concrete beams; a steel frame system with a concrete core; concrete-encased steel columns; concrete-filled steel tubes; etc. Where known, the CTBUH database breaks out the materials used in a composite building’s core, columns, and floor spanning separately.

concrete

Official Website

One Madison Park

Height
Architectural
Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

189.3 m / 621 ft

To Tip
Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).
195.7 m / 642 ft
Occupied
Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest occupied floor within the building.
176.4 m / 579 ft
Floors Above Ground
The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

50

Floors Below Ground
The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

1

# of Apartments
Number of Apartments refers to the total number of residential units (including both rental units and condominiums) contained within a particular building.

69

# of Elevators
Number of Elevators refers to the total number of elevator cars (not shafts) contained within a particular building (including public, private and freight elevators).

2

Tower GFA
Tower GFA refers to the total gross floor area within the tower footprint, not including adjoining podiums, connected buildings or other towers within the development.

16,763 m² / 180,435 ft²

Rankings
#
2246
Tallest in the World
#
356
Tallest in North America
#
616
Tallest Residential Building in the World
#
83
Tallest Residential Building in North America
#
69
Tallest Residential Building in United States
#
36
Tallest Residential Building in New York City
#
1173
Tallest Concrete Building in the World
#
145
Tallest Concrete Building in North America
#
117
Tallest Concrete Building in United States
#
49
Tallest Concrete Building in New York City
Construction Schedule
2005

Proposed

2006

Construction Start

2010

Completed

Architect
Design

Usually involved in the front end design, with a "typical" condition being that of a leadership role through either Schematic Design or Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Structural Engineer
Design

The Design Engineer is usually involved in the front end design, typically taking the leadership role in the Schematic Design and Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Contractor
Main Contractor

The main contractor is the supervisory contractor of all construction work on a project, management of sub-contractors and vendors, etc. May be referred to as "Construction Manager," however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Main Contractor" exclusively.

Material Supplier

Material Supplier refers to organizations which supplied significant systems/materials for a building project (e.g. elevator suppliers, facade suppliers, etc).

Elevator
Owner
CIM Group; HFZ Capital Group; Related Companies
Developer
Slazer Enterprises LLC
Architect
Design

Usually involved in the front end design, with a "typical" condition being that of a leadership role through either Schematic Design or Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Structural Engineer
Design

The Design Engineer is usually involved in the front end design, typically taking the leadership role in the Schematic Design and Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

MEP Engineer
Design

The Design Engineer is usually involved in the front end design, typically taking the leadership role in the Schematic Design and Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

MGJ Engineering, P.C.
Contractor
Main Contractor

The main contractor is the supervisory contractor of all construction work on a project, management of sub-contractors and vendors, etc. May be referred to as "Construction Manager," however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Main Contractor" exclusively.

Other Consultant

Other Consultant refers to other organizations which provided significant consultation services for a building project (e.g. wind consultants, environmental consultants, fire and life safety consultants, etc).

Building Monitoring
Vidaris, Inc.
Façade

These are firms that consult on the design of a building's façade. May often be referred to as "Cladding," "Envelope," "Exterior Wall," or "Curtain Wall" Consultant, however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Façade Consultant" exclusively.

Vidaris, Inc.
Roofing
Vidaris, Inc.
Material Supplier

Material Supplier refers to organizations which supplied significant systems/materials for a building project (e.g. elevator suppliers, facade suppliers, etc).

Elevator

CTBUH Awards & Distinctions

Best Tall Building Americas 2010 Award of Excellence

2010 CTBUH Awards

CTBUH Initiatives

The Current State of Slender Buildings in NYC

30 July 2015 - Event

One Madison Park Chosen as Featured Building

1 August 2011 - Featured Building

Research

26 October 2015

Apartments in Skyscrapers: Innovations and Perspectives of their Typology Development

Elena Generalova & Viktor Generalov, Samara State University of Architecture and Civil Engineering

The paper proposes to reflect on the questions: what does the typology of apartments in contemporary high-rise construction mean and whether it is consistent with...

About One Madison Park

One Madison Park is situated in a unique location on the Manhattan grid, fronting on East 23rd Street, a busy cross town thoroughfare—and at the foot of Madison Avenue, a major north–south thoroughfare that begins at 23rd Street, directly to the north. The tower acts as an axial icon on Madison Avenue, making the tower visible from great distances at the street level. The architectural challenge was to create a modern form that was respectful to the context of the Madison Square Park neighborhood while creating a visual dialogue with the adjacent historical high-rise building such as the Flatiron Building (1902) and the facing Met Life Tower (1909).

In order to allow construction to begin before the site could be entirely cleared it was decided that a portion of the tower would have to cantilever over an existing three-story building adjacent to the tower on its eastern side. The design team seized upon this idea to give the tower its unique configuration. From the main square mast of the tower clad in dark bronze glass, another shaft clad in white and clear glass is partially inserted and cantilevered from the main shaft in blocks ranging from four to six stories. The spaces between these blocks allowed for full floor residences with terraces built out onto the roof of the block below, that wrap around the north and east sides of the apartment.

The tower sits on a five-story base that holds commercial and service uses on the ground floor. Above the first floor, the base incorporates the main mechanical spaces and two levels of amenity spaces for the residents, which includes a fitness center, indoor pool, spa, and a private lounge with a terrace overlooking Madison Park.

Due to the placement of the tower in the middle of the site, each side could have windows opening to expansive views. Lateral bracing usually located around the perimeter was instead placed in the center, forming a cruciform of shear walls, buried between rooms and shafts minimizing the impact to room layouts. This integration of efficient space planning and structure gives each room within the homes an open expansive feeling focused on the city views beyond. High efficiency glazing was incorporated into the exterior skin to reduce solar heat gain with automated solar shading in each living room. An abundance of natural light is brought into every space of the tower which helps to minimize the need for artificial lighting. Due to its perimeter location, even the elevator lobby on every floor has a south facing window to bring in light and views.

The building’s footprint is 15.25m x 16.15m (50ft x 53ft) and is described as a slender tower with a height-to-width ratio of 12:1. Therefore, the lateral wind and seismic force-resisting system was the major engineering challenge. Naturally the shear wall stiffness and strength had to be maximized for this slender building while supporting the architectural design. This has been achieved by a combination of optimizing the configuration of the shear walls and using high performance concrete.

Due to its high slenderness ratio, the building’s lateral dynamic movement is mitigated by the design and the incorporation of a Tuned Liquid Damping System to reduce the acceleration of building motions. The system is comprised of three cast-in-place reinforced concrete tanks filled with water and incorporated into the building structure at roof level. More specifically the tanks are known as Tuned Liquid Column Dampers which are U-shaped to maximize their effect while occupying less floor area. The dampers were designed to provide approximately 3% additional damping to the building, and reduce the building accelerations to acceptable levels.

CTBUH Awards & Distinctions

Best Tall Building Americas 2010 Award of Excellence

2010 CTBUH Awards

30 July 2015

The Current State of Slender Buildings in NYC

SHoP Architects welcomed a group of architects and engineers for a lively discussion and exchange of ideas about slender buildings.

1 August 2011

One Madison Park Chosen as Featured Building

One Madison Park is situated in a unique location on the Manhattan grid. The strong yet simple form rises from a seemingly impossibly small New York City site.