Palais Royale
Mumbai India
Height 320 m / 1,050 ft
Floors 88
Official Name

The current legal building name.

Palais Royale
Type

CTBUH collects data on two major types of tall structures: 'Buildings' and 'Telecommunications / Observation Towers.' A 'Building' is a structure where at least 50% of the height is occupied by usable floor area. A 'Telecommunications / Observation Tower' is a structure where less than 50% of the structure's height is occupied by usable floor area. Only 'Buildings' are eligible for the CTBUH 'Tallest Buildings' lists.

Building
Status
Completed
Architecturally Topped Out
Structurally Topped Out
Under Construction
Proposed
On Hold
Never Completed
Vision
Competition Entry
Canceled
Proposed Renovation
Under Renovation
Renovated
Under Demolition
Demolished
On Hold
Country

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of Country, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

City

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of City, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

Function

A single-function tall building is defined as one where 85% or more of its usable floor area is dedicated to a single usage. Thus a building with 90% office floor area would be said to be an "office" building, irrespective of other minor functions it may also contain.

A mixed-use tall building contains two or more functions (or uses), where each of the functions occupy a significant proportion of the tower's total space. Support areas such as car parks and mechanical plant space do not constitute mixed-use functions. Functions are denoted on CTBUH "Tallest Building" lists in descending order, e.g., "hotel/office" indicates hotel function above office function.

residential
Structural Material

Steel
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from steel. Note that a building of steel construction with a floor system of concrete planks or concrete slab on top of steel beams is still considered a “steel” structure as the concrete elements are not acting as the primary structure.

Reinforced Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from concrete which has been cast in place and utilizes steel reinforcement bars.

Precast Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning system are constructed from steel reinforced concrete which has been precast as individual components and assembled together on-site.

Mixed-Structure
Utilizes distinct systems (e.g. steel, concrete, timber), one on top of the other. For example, a steel/concrete indicates a steel structural system located on top of a concrete structural system, with the opposite true of concrete/steel.

Composite
A combination of materials (e.g. steel, concrete, timber) are used together in the main structural elements. Examples include buildings which utilize: steel columns with a floor system of reinforced concrete beams; a steel frame system with a concrete core; concrete-encased steel columns; concrete-filled steel tubes; etc. Where known, the CTBUH database breaks out the materials used in a composite building’s core, columns, and floor spanning separately.

concrete
LEED Platinum
Height

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

Architectural
320 m / 1,050 ft
To Tip
320 m / 1,050 ft
Floors Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

88
# of Elevators

Number of Elevators refers to the total number of elevator cars (not shafts) contained within a particular building (including public, private and freight elevators).

10
Construction Schedule
2005

Proposed

2008

Construction Start

Developer
Shree Ram Urban Infrastructure
Architect
Talati Panthaky Associates
Structural Engineer
Sterling Consultancy Services Pvt. Ltd.
CBM Engineers
Dongre Associates
Raghuveer Urban Constructions Co. Pvt. Ltd.

Wind

Cladding

DuPont

Elevator

Formwork

Meva Formwork Systems

CTBUH Initiatives

Palais Royale


4 February 2010 - Building Tour

Videos

21 September 2012 | Mumbai

India, with its relatively young tall building industry, is now beginning to experiment with the supertall, a handful of which are now under construction in...

Research

19 September 2012

Joseph Colaco, CBM Engineers; Girish Dravid, Sterling Engineering Consultancy Services; Vikas Kasliwal, Shree Ram Urban Infrastructure

This paper describes the design and construction of the Palais Royale Residential Tower in downtown Mumbai, India (the tower is 325 m. tall from the...

Global News

06 May 2019 | Mumbai

In a major development, Indiabulls Housing Finance Ltd (IHFL) has decided to auction the iconic Palais Royale building to recover dues worth Rs 971 crore...

About Palais Royale

When construction began in 2008, Palais Royale was expected to be the India’s first super tall building. The location in the Worli area of Mumbi was traditionally a low-rise neighborhood, but like much of the city at large, has been experiencing a high-rise building boom and a rapidly emerging skyline. The luxury building was the first residential tower was the first to designed around a LEED pre-certification and from the onset of the project, the development team sought to achieve a platinum rating.

In order increase the comfort level of the occupants, the tower was designed to have as little movement as possible through the use of very robust reinforced concrete frame and a low aspect ratio of 1:3. With a wide tower footprint of 100 meters across, the structure was able to incorporate an interior atrium stretching 215 meters in height, among the tallest atriums ever constructed. Because the tower design did not have a podium or any adjoining structures, parking and amenity levels were included within the tower footprint. This required a wider spacing of columns in the lower floors and the use of an extensive load transfer, in which the reinforced concrete beams are up to 9 meters deep, among the largest ever constructed. Construction also broke a record for the largest single day concrete pour in the history of Mumbi.

The design specifies the façade cladding to be entirely made of DuPont’s Corian, the first time it has been used on a residential high-rise and was chosen for the material’s resistance to the local humid tropical climate. With the rapid growth of Mumbai, the development team included many green features working to reduce the building’s impact on the city’s often overburdened infrastructure. This includes an on-site sewage treatment plant, organic waste composting, rainwater harvesting as well as wind turbines and solar panels, all of which contribute to the ambitious design’s approach towards sustainability.

21 September 2012 | Mumbai

India, with its relatively young tall building industry, is now beginning to experiment with the supertall, a handful of which are now under construction in...

19 September 2012

Joseph Colaco, CBM Engineers; Girish Dravid, Sterling Engineering Consultancy Services; Vikas Kasliwal, Shree Ram Urban Infrastructure

This paper describes the design and construction of the Palais Royale Residential Tower in downtown Mumbai, India (the tower is 325 m. tall from the...

06 May 2019 | Mumbai

In a major development, Indiabulls Housing Finance Ltd (IHFL) has decided to auction the iconic Palais Royale building to recover dues worth Rs 971 crore...

21 September 2012

India, with its relatively young tall building industry, is now beginning to experiment with the supertall, a handful of which are now under construction in Mumbai. The first of these scheduled to complete is the 320-meter Palais Royale Residential Tower, which will become the country’s tallest building when it completes in 2013. This presentation examines India’s first supertall as a case study, focusing on the design and construction of the project.

4 February 2010

Palais Royale

Located in Worli, Mumbai, Palais Royale is a first-of-its-kind residential project by Shree Ram Urban Infrastructure Ltd : it is India’s first and largest green residential building.

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