11
Global
Height rank
Shanghai World Financial Center
Shanghai
Height

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

1
To Tip:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).

494.3 m / 1,622 ft
2
Architectural:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

492 m / 1,614 ft
3
Occupied:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest occupied floor within the building.

474 m / 1,555 ft
1 2 3 Shanghai World Financial Center Outline
Floors

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

101
Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

3
Height 492 m / 1,614 ft
Floors 101
Official Name

The current legal building name.

Shanghai World Financial Center
Other Names

Other names the building has commonly been known as, including former names, common informal names, local names, etc.

SWFC
Type

CTBUH collects data on two major types of tall structures: 'Buildings' and 'Telecommunications / Observation Towers.' A 'Building' is a structure where at least 50% of the height is occupied by usable floor area. A 'Telecommunications / Observation Tower' is a structure where less than 50% of the structure's height is occupied by usable floor area. Only 'Buildings' are eligible for the CTBUH 'Tallest Buildings' lists.

Building
Status
Completed
Architecturally Topped Out
Structurally Topped Out
Under Construction
Proposed
On Hold
Never Completed
Vision
Competition Entry
Canceled
Proposed Renovation
Under Renovation
Renovated
Under Demolition
Demolished
Completed, 2008
Country

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of Country, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

City

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of City, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

Postal Code
200120
Function

A single-function tall building is defined as one where 85% or more of its usable floor area is dedicated to a single usage. Thus a building with 90% office floor area would be said to be an "office" building, irrespective of other minor functions it may also contain.

A mixed-use tall building contains two or more functions (or uses), where each of the functions occupy a significant proportion of the tower's total space. Support areas such as car parks and mechanical plant space do not constitute mixed-use functions. Functions are denoted on CTBUH "Tallest Building" lists in descending order, e.g., "hotel/office" indicates hotel function above office function.

hotel / office
Structural Material

Steel
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from steel. Note that a building of steel construction with a floor system of concrete planks or concrete slab on top of steel beams is still considered a “steel” structure as the concrete elements are not acting as the primary structure.

Reinforced Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from concrete which has been cast in place and utilizes steel reinforcement bars.

Precast Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning system are constructed from steel reinforced concrete which has been precast as individual components and assembled together on-site.

Mixed-Structure
Utilizes distinct systems (e.g. steel, concrete, timber), one on top of the other. For example, a steel/concrete indicates a steel structural system located on top of a concrete structural system, with the opposite true of concrete/steel.

Composite
A combination of materials (e.g. steel, concrete, timber) are used together in the main structural elements. Examples include buildings which utilize: steel columns with a floor system of reinforced concrete beams; a steel frame system with a concrete core; concrete-encased steel columns; concrete-filled steel tubes; etc. Where known, the CTBUH database breaks out the materials used in a composite building’s core, columns, and floor spanning separately.

composite
Core
Reinforced Concrete
Columns
Concrete Encased Steel
Floor Spanning
Steel
Height

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

Architectural
492 m / 1,614 ft
To Tip
494.33 m / 1,622 ft
Occupied
474 m / 1,555 ft
Observatory
474 m / 1,555 ft
Floors Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

101
Floors Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

3
# of Parking Spaces

Number of Parking Spaces refers to the total number of car parking spaces contained within a particular building.

1100
# of Elevators

Number of Elevators refers to the total number of elevator cars (not shafts) contained within a particular building (including public, private and freight elevators).

91
Tower GFA

Tower GFA refers to the total gross floor area within the tower footprint, not including adjoining podiums, connected buildings or other towers within the development.

381,600 m² / 4,107,508 ft²
Rankings
#
11
Tallest in the World
#
8
Tallest in Asia
#
7
Tallest in China
#
2
Tallest in Shanghai
#
7
Tallest Mixed-use Building in the World
#
5
Tallest Mixed-use Building in Asia
#
4
Tallest Mixed-use Building in China
#
2
Tallest Mixed-use Building in Shanghai
#
9
Tallest Composite Building in the World
#
8
Tallest Composite Building in Asia
#
7
Tallest Composite Building in China
#
2
Tallest Composite Building in Shanghai
Construction Schedule
1994

Proposed

1997

Construction Start

2008

Completed

Developer
Architect
Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates; Mori Building; Irie Miyake Architects and Engineers
East China Architectural Design & Research Institute; Shanghai Modern Architectural Design Company
Structural Engineer
MEP Engineer
Kenchiku Setsubi Sekkei Kenkyusho
Contractor

Marketing

Quantity Surveyor

(not specified)

Cladding

Elevator

Hitachi, Ltd.; Otis Elevator Company; thyssenkrupp; Toshiba Elevator and Building Systems Corporation (TELC)

Façade Maintenance Equipment

Formwork

Paint/Coating

AkzoNobel

Sealants

Steel

China Construction Steel Structure Corporation; ArcelorMittal

CTBUH Awards & Distinctions

Best Tall Building Worldwide 2008 Winner

2008 CTBUH Awards

10 Year Award 2018 Winner

2018 CTBUH Awards

Best Tall Building Asia & Australasia 2008 Winner

2008 CTBUH Awards

CTBUH Initiatives

CTBUH Study Examines Tallest Buildings with Dampers


22 August 2018 - CTBUH Research

Vertical Transportation: Ascent & Acceleration


12 September 2017 - CTBUH Research

Videos

16 August 2018 | Shanghai

William Pedersen, Principal, Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates, sat down with CTBUH to discuss his vision for the iconic Shanghai World Financial Center, which was recognized...

Research

12 January 2021

CTBUH Research

The tall buildings completed in 2020 have pushed the global average height of the 100 tallest buildings to 399 meters. Across the year, 14 buildings...

About Shanghai World Financial Center

The Shanghai World Financial Center is a symbol of commerce and culture that speaks to the city’s emergence as a global capital. Located in Shanghai’s Pudong District, the mixed-used Shanghai World Financial Center is a vertical city, containing 62 office floors, conference facilities, urban retail and dining spaces, and a 174-room five-star Park Hyatt Hotel at the top—the world’s highest hotel from the 79th to 93rd floors. Above the hotel, at the 94th to 100th floors, is a visitors’ square and observatory.

Shaped by the intersection of two sweeping arcs and a square prism—shapes representing ancient Chinese symbols of heaven and earth, respectively—the tower’s tapering form supports programmatic efficiencies, from large floor plates at its base for offices to rectilinear floors near the top for hotel rooms. Its boldest feature, the 164-foot-wide portal carved through its upper levels relieves the enormous wind pressures on the building. The project activates the ground plane through function-specific entrance volumes (e.g., hotel, office and retail) that extend from its stone-clad base. To further connect the activities of the building to the city, the retail volume is oriented toward a public park planned for an adjacent site.

Optimizing form and function was paramount to the design, integrating the structure, mechanical systems, and exterior envelope in a modular system that repeats every 13 floors to facilitate the fabrication and installation of components, and, in turn, reduce construction time, material waste, and structural inefficiencies. The purity of the tower’s design belies the inherent complexity of the various building systems within, and is readily adaptable to the changing programmatic requirements that often arise during the long timeline of such a large project, as well as to the changing needs of building users.

The project was put on hold in 1995 after the completion of the foundations. When revived in 1999 the height and base dimensions were both increased from the original design. Reinforcing the existing piles to accommodate these changes would have been possible but costly. The new, taller structure would not only have to be made lighter, but would need to resist higher wind loads, which increase exponentially with height.

The project’s structural engineer developed a new system, employing composite mega-columns, diagonal mega-braces, steel out-riggers, belt trusses, and core wall trusses, the pile loads were redistributed to accept increased lateral loads from wind and earthquake. The stiffness of the lateral force-resisting system of the perimeter wall was increased, and as such, the original design for the perimeter framing was abandoned in favor of a diagonal-braced frame with added outrigger trusses coupled to the columns of the mega-structure. This enabled the weight of the building to be reduced by more than 10% and resulted in a reduced cost for the structure, provided for speedier construction, and significantly reduced the material that went into the building and thus made the building even more environmentally friendly.

CTBUH Awards & Distinctions

Best Tall Building Worldwide 2008 Winner

2008 CTBUH Awards

10 Year Award 2018 Winner

2018 CTBUH Awards

Best Tall Building Asia & Australasia 2008 Winner

2008 CTBUH Awards

16 August 2018 | Shanghai

William Pedersen, Principal, Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates, sat down with CTBUH to discuss his vision for the iconic Shanghai World Financial Center, which was recognized...

30 May 2018 | Shanghai

The Shanghai World Financial Center (SWFC) is a symbol of commerce and culture that speaks to the city’s emergence as a global capital. Located in...

19 October 2016 | Shanghai

Wednesday, October 19, 2016. Gaungzhou, China. Florence Chan of Kohn Pedersen Fox presents at the 2016 China Conference Plenary 4: "Guangzhou Developments" Since the reformation...

27 October 2015 | Shanghai

A city is a stage where a wide range of activities take place. An internationally competitive city is one in which diverse human interaction and...

27 October 2015 | Shanghai

Hiroo Mori of Mori Building is interviewed by Chris Bentley during the 2015 CTBUH New York Conference at the Grand Hyatt New York. Hiroo discusses...

17 September 2014 | Shanghai

Wednesday 17th September 2014. Shanghai, China. David Malott, CTBUH Chairman-Elect / Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates, is interviewed by Chris Bentley during the 2014 CTBUH Shanghai...

12 January 2021

CTBUH Research

The tall buildings completed in 2020 have pushed the global average height of the 100 tallest buildings to 399 meters. Across the year, 14 buildings...

20 March 2020

CTBUH Research

In the first edition of the 2012 Journal, CTBUH published a Tall Buildings in Numbers study titled Tallest 20 in 2020: Era of the Megatall—The...

30 January 2020

CTBUH Research

In 2019, 126 buildings of 200 meters’ height or greater were completed. This was a 13.7 percent decrease from 146 in 2018. The total number...

28 December 2019

SawTeen See, Robert Bird Group Pty Ltd

Aerodynamic damping through the use of vertical long slots reduces the dynamic component of the wind loads on the building. Seminal examples include the three-legged...

31 January 2019

CTBUH Research

In 2018, 143 buildings of 200 meters’ height or greater were completed. This is a slight decrease from 2017’s record-breaking total of 147, and it...

01 September 2018

Kyoung Sun Moon, Yale University School of Architecture

Tall buildings which began from about 40 m tall office towers in the late 19th century have evolved into mixed-use megatall towers over 800 m....

22 August 2018

CTBUH Study Examines Tallest Buildings with Dampers

CTBUH has released a Tall Buildings in Numbers (TBIN) interactive data study on the world's tallest buildings with dampers.

12 September 2017

Vertical Transportation: Ascent & Acceleration

CTBUH partnered with Guinness World Records to identify the commercial building with the fastest elevator speeds and longest vertical runs.

17 January 2017

SuperTEC Visit to CTBUH China Office

The CTBUH China Office hosted a visit from SuperTEC, a consortium of researchers and practitioners from Korea University and Dankook University in Seoul.

13 October 2016

The Council is pleased to announce the Top Company Rankings for numerous disciplines as derived from the list of projects appearing in 100 of the World’s Tallest Buildings.

19 September 2014

Shanghai World Financial Center Technical Tour Report

Delegates met at the lobby of the Shanghai World Financial Center for a tour, led by executives of Mori Building, of one of Shanghai’s most recognizable landmarks.

14 November 2012

CTBUH to Study the Life Cycle of Tall Building Structural Systems

ArcelorMittal has awarded a $300,000 research grant to the CTBUH to study and compare the full range of environmental effects assignable to structural systems in tall buildings.