42
Global
Height rank
Shun Hing Square
Shenzhen
Height

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

1
To Tip:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).

384 m / 1,260 ft
2
Architectural:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

384 m / 1,260 ft
3
Occupied:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest occupied floor within the building.

298 m / 978 ft
1 2 3 Shun Hing Square Outline
Floors

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

69
Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

3
Height 384 m / 1,260 ft
Floors 69
Official Name

The current legal building name.

Shun Hing Square
Other Names

Other names the building has commonly been known as, including former names, common informal names, local names, etc.

Di Wang Commercial Centre
Type

CTBUH collects data on two major types of tall structures: 'Buildings' and 'Telecommunications / Observation Towers.' A 'Building' is a structure where at least 50% of the height is occupied by usable floor area. A 'Telecommunications / Observation Tower' is a structure where less than 50% of the structure's height is occupied by usable floor area. Only 'Buildings' are eligible for the CTBUH 'Tallest Buildings' lists.

Building
Status
Completed
Architecturally Topped Out
Structurally Topped Out
Under Construction
Proposed
On Hold
Never Completed
Vision
Competition Entry
Canceled
Proposed Renovation
Under Renovation
Renovated
Under Demolition
Demolished
Completed, 1996
Country

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of Country, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

City

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of City, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

Postal Code
518001
Function

A single-function tall building is defined as one where 85% or more of its usable floor area is dedicated to a single usage. Thus a building with 90% office floor area would be said to be an "office" building, irrespective of other minor functions it may also contain.

A mixed-use tall building contains two or more functions (or uses), where each of the functions occupy a significant proportion of the tower's total space. Support areas such as car parks and mechanical plant space do not constitute mixed-use functions. Functions are denoted on CTBUH "Tallest Building" lists in descending order, e.g., "hotel/office" indicates hotel function above office function.

office
Structural Material

Steel
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from steel. Note that a building of steel construction with a floor system of concrete planks or concrete slab on top of steel beams is still considered a “steel” structure as the concrete elements are not acting as the primary structure.

Reinforced Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from concrete which has been cast in place and utilizes steel reinforcement bars.

Precast Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning system are constructed from steel reinforced concrete which has been precast as individual components and assembled together on-site.

Mixed-Structure
Utilizes distinct systems (e.g. steel, concrete, timber), one on top of the other. For example, a steel/concrete indicates a steel structural system located on top of a concrete structural system, with the opposite true of concrete/steel.

Composite
A combination of materials (e.g. steel, concrete, timber) are used together in the main structural elements. Examples include buildings which utilize: steel columns with a floor system of reinforced concrete beams; a steel frame system with a concrete core; concrete-encased steel columns; concrete-filled steel tubes; etc. Where known, the CTBUH database breaks out the materials used in a composite building’s core, columns, and floor spanning separately.

composite
Core
Reinforced Concrete
Columns
Concrete Encased Steel
Floor Spanning
Steel
Height

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

Architectural
384 m / 1,260 ft
To Tip
384 m / 1,260 ft
Occupied
298 m / 978 ft
Observatory
298.09 m / 978 ft
Floors Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

69
Floors Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

3
# of Parking Spaces

Number of Parking Spaces refers to the total number of car parking spaces contained within a particular building.

900
# of Elevators

Number of Elevators refers to the total number of elevator cars (not shafts) contained within a particular building (including public, private and freight elevators).

36
Tower GFA

Tower GFA refers to the total gross floor area within the tower footprint, not including adjoining podiums, connected buildings or other towers within the development.

280,000 m² / 3,013,895 ft²
Rankings
#
42
Tallest in the World
#
28
Tallest in Asia
#
22
Tallest in China
#
5
Tallest in Shenzhen
#
16
Tallest Office Building in the World
#
10
Tallest Office Building in Asia
#
7
Tallest Office Building in China
#
3
Tallest Office Building in Shenzhen
#
30
Tallest Composite Building in the World
#
27
Tallest Composite Building in Asia
#
22
Tallest Composite Building in China
#
5
Tallest Composite Building in Shenzhen
Construction Schedule
1993

Construction Start

1996

Completed

Owner
Kumagai Gumi
Developer
Karbony Investment
Architect
American Design Associates; K.Y. Cheung Design Associates
Structural Engineer
MEP Engineer
Associated Consulting Engineers
Contractor
China State Construction Engineering Corporation; Hong Kong Construction (Holdings) Limited; Kumagai Gumi

Civil

Geotechnical

Vertical Transportation

Mitsubishi Elevator and Escalator

Construction Hoists

Elevator

Mitsubishi Elevator and Escalator

Steel

China Construction Steel Structure Corporation; Nippon Steel & Sumitomo Metal Corporation

CTBUH Initiatives

Videos

18 October 2016 | Shenzhen

Tuesday October 18, 2016. Shenzhen, China. Chongguang Xu of Shenzhen Municipal Government, presents at the 2016 China Conference Session 7b: Shenzhen Bay Development. This presentation...

About Shun Hing Square

Shun Hing Square, which is also known as the Diwang Building, is built on a triangular site on Shenzhen’s main east-west corridor, Shennan Road, and is a key feature of the area known as Shenzhen’s Special Economic Zone. The tower and its nearby annex, which share a variety of visual cues, are juxtaposed in a “T” formation to accommodate mutual sightlines. The main tower holds 144,200 square meters of Grade A office space, while the accompanying 35-floor annex contains 330 high-end apartments, a parking garage, and a five-story shopping arcade podium. The wedge-shaped annex building holds a swimming pool in a 22-meter-wide opening between the towers, allowing sunlight in to brighten the façade.

The main tower was built at the incredible rate of four floors every nine days, taking just 40 months to complete from start to finish. The tower’s form resembles a pair of syringes, with distinctive rooftop lasers that give off striking beams of colored light at night. From a distance, the building’s skin appears to have simple horizontal and vertical patterns; however, upon closer inspection, smaller accents of varying color and material add a touch of complexity to the exterior. The building’s color palette includes earthen tones of natural browns and striking green glass. Shun Hing Square boasts an impressive observation deck at the 69th floor, called the Meridian View Centre, which affords exceptional views of the city.

A rectangular tower plan was implemented to accommodate an assortment of 328-square-meter office spaces. The design also strove to encompass the maximum fire compartment size per floor. This special consideration resulted in a structure with a height to width ratio of 1:8, an extraordinary feat in this typhoon and earthquake design zone, where buildings are typically subjected to intense overturning forces.

18 October 2016 | Shenzhen

Tuesday October 18, 2016. Shenzhen, China. Chongguang Xu of Shenzhen Municipal Government, presents at the 2016 China Conference Session 7b: Shenzhen Bay Development. This presentation...

17 October 2016 | Shenzhen

Monday, October 17, 2016. Shenzhen, China. A panel discussing the challenges of growing urban populations throughout the globe.

13 October 2016

The Council is pleased to announce the Top Company Rankings for numerous disciplines as derived from the list of projects appearing in 100 of the World’s Tallest Buildings.

25 February 2016

CITAB and CTBUH are pleased to announce the award recipients for the inaugural CITAB-CTBUH 2016 China Tall Building Awards.