103
Global
Height rank
3 World Trade Center
New York City
Height

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

1
To Tip:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).

328.9 m / 1,079 ft
2
Architectural:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

328.9 m / 1,079 ft
1 2 3 World Trade Center Outline
Floors

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

69
Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

4
Height 328.88 m / 1,079 ft
Floors 69
Official Name

The current legal building name.

3 World Trade Center
Other Names

Other names the building has commonly been known as, including former names, common informal names, local names, etc.

Tower 3
Name of Complex

A complex is a group of buildings which are designed and built as pieces of a greater development.

Type

CTBUH collects data on two major types of tall structures: 'Buildings' and 'Telecommunications / Observation Towers.' A 'Building' is a structure where at least 50% of the height is occupied by usable floor area. A 'Telecommunications / Observation Tower' is a structure where less than 50% of the structure's height is occupied by usable floor area. Only 'Buildings' are eligible for the CTBUH 'Tallest Buildings' lists.

Building
Status
Completed
Architecturally Topped Out
Structurally Topped Out
Under Construction
Proposed
On Hold
Never Completed
Vision
Competition Entry
Canceled
Proposed Renovation
Under Renovation
Renovated
Under Demolition
Demolished
Completed, 2018
Country

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of Country, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

City

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of City, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

Postal Code
10048
Function

A single-function tall building is defined as one where 85% or more of its usable floor area is dedicated to a single usage. Thus a building with 90% office floor area would be said to be an "office" building, irrespective of other minor functions it may also contain.

A mixed-use tall building contains two or more functions (or uses), where each of the functions occupy a significant proportion of the tower's total space. Support areas such as car parks and mechanical plant space do not constitute mixed-use functions. Functions are denoted on CTBUH "Tallest Building" lists in descending order, e.g., "hotel/office" indicates hotel function above office function.

office
Structural Material

Steel
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from steel. Note that a building of steel construction with a floor system of concrete planks or concrete slab on top of steel beams is still considered a “steel” structure as the concrete elements are not acting as the primary structure.

Reinforced Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from concrete which has been cast in place and utilizes steel reinforcement bars.

Precast Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning system are constructed from steel reinforced concrete which has been precast as individual components and assembled together on-site.

Mixed-Structure
Utilizes distinct systems (e.g. steel, concrete, timber), one on top of the other. For example, a steel/concrete indicates a steel structural system located on top of a concrete structural system, with the opposite true of concrete/steel.

Composite
A combination of materials (e.g. steel, concrete, timber) are used together in the main structural elements. Examples include buildings which utilize: steel columns with a floor system of reinforced concrete beams; a steel frame system with a concrete core; concrete-encased steel columns; concrete-filled steel tubes; etc. Where known, the CTBUH database breaks out the materials used in a composite building’s core, columns, and floor spanning separately.

composite
Columns
Steel
Floor Spanning
Steel
LEED Gold
Official Website
Height

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

Architectural
328.88 m / 1,079 ft
To Tip
328.88 m / 1,079 ft
Floors Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

69
Floors Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

4
# of Elevators

Number of Elevators refers to the total number of elevator cars (not shafts) contained within a particular building (including public, private and freight elevators).

37
Tower GFA

Tower GFA refers to the total gross floor area within the tower footprint, not including adjoining podiums, connected buildings or other towers within the development.

260,129 m² / 2,800,005 ft²
Rankings
#
103
Tallest in the World
#
15
Tallest in North America
#
15
Tallest in United States
#
8
Tallest in New York City
#
37
Tallest Office Building in the World
#
8
Tallest Office Building in North America
#
8
Tallest Office Building in United States
#
6
Tallest Office Building in New York City
#
62
Tallest Composite Building in the World
#
6
Tallest Composite Building in North America
#
6
Tallest Composite Building in United States
#
4
Tallest Composite Building in New York City
Construction Schedule
2010

Construction Start

2018

Completed

Owner/Developer
Silverstein Properties
Architect
Structural Engineer
MEP Engineer

Building Monitoring

Vidaris, Inc.

Energy Concept

Vidaris, Inc.
Permasteelisa Group; Vidaris, Inc.

Roofing

Vidaris, Inc.

Security

Ducibella Venter & Santore

Vertical Transportation

Wind

Construction Hoists

Formwork

Steel

ArcelorMittal; CAST CONNEX; Owen Steel Company Inc.

CTBUH Initiatives

Research

12 December 2018

CTBUH Research

The astronomical growth in tall building construction observed over the past decade continued in 2018, though the total number of completed buildings of 200 meters’...

About 3 World Trade Center

As part of the World Trade Center (WTC) master plan in New York’s financial district, 3 World Trade Center is fundamentally linked and fully integrated into its surroundings. The building’s design cannot be understood in a vacuum; rather it is intimately related to, and inspired by, the other structures within the World Trade Center complex. It is located opposite the WTC Memorial and Cultural Center, and at the heart of the cluster of buildings which surround the memorial. As the complex’s commercial core, the tower had to address the issue of balancing retail and office uses, while also complementing and acknowledging the nearby public space.

The building has an orthogonal relationship to the main space between the memorial water pools. To complement this relationship, the central zone of the building reduces in mass as it rises towards the sky. The effect is a stepped profile that accentuates the building’s vertical relative to the memorial, and is sympathetic to the height and positions of the neighboring structures. Spires emphasize the height and slender profile of the building both in the local context, and as part of the Manhattan skyline.

The tower’s podium will house a variety of retail elements and five trading floors, which require large floor plates. Work on the podium took place early in the construction process, but after the project was put on hold in 2012, it stood partially built until construction resumed in 2015. As the building narrows, smaller floor plates will accommodate various office spaces. To maximize sustainability in terms of the building’s day-to-day operations, a number of sustainable design features have been included that are expected to give the building a LEED Gold certification. As part of the World Trade Center master plan, 3 World Trade Center manages to interact with its surrounding environment while still maintaining a sense of independence as a standalone structure.

12 December 2018

CTBUH Research

The astronomical growth in tall building construction observed over the past decade continued in 2018, though the total number of completed buildings of 200 meters’...

01 August 2011

Jan Klerks, CTBUH

Almost 10 years after the destruction of the Twin Towers, the reconstruction of the World Trade Center site is in full swing. One World Trade...

12 December 2018

The astronomical growth in tall building construction observed over the past decade continued in 2018, though the total number of completed buildings of 200 meters’ or greater height leveled off at 143, after hitting an all-time record of 147 in 2017.

13 October 2016

The Council is pleased to announce the Top Company Rankings for numerous disciplines as derived from the list of projects appearing in 100 of the World’s Tallest Buildings.

28 October 2015

CTBUH 2015 delegates toured the World Trade Center: 3, 4 and 7, all of which are in the middle of construction.

28 October 2015

CTBUH 2015 delegates toured the infrastructure and underground of the World Trade Center complex which will house a variety of civic programs.

28 October 2015

CTBUH 2015 delegates toured 30 Park Place which will house the Four Seasons Hotel and Private Residences Downtown New York.

21 May 2014

CTBUH Visits 1WTC, 4WTC and 7WTC

Just six months after CTBUH confirmed One World Trade Center's height, Executive Director Antony Wood and Events Manager Jessica Rinkel toured the building.