27
Global
Height rank
432 Park Avenue
New York City
Height

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

1
To Tip:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).

425.7 m / 1,397 ft
2
Architectural:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

425.7 m / 1,397 ft
3
Occupied:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest occupied floor within the building.

392.1 m / 1,287 ft
1 2 3 432 Park Avenue Outline
Floors

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

85
Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

3
Height 425.7 m / 1,397 ft
Floors 85
Official Name

The current legal building name.

432 Park Avenue
Type

CTBUH collects data on two major types of tall structures: 'Buildings' and 'Telecommunications / Observation Towers.' A 'Building' is a structure where at least 50% of the height is occupied by usable floor area. A 'Telecommunications / Observation Tower' is a structure where less than 50% of the structure's height is occupied by usable floor area. Only 'Buildings' are eligible for the CTBUH 'Tallest Buildings' lists.

Building
Status
Completed
Architecturally Topped Out
Structurally Topped Out
Under Construction
Proposed
On Hold
Never Completed
Vision
Competition Entry
Canceled
Proposed Renovation
Under Renovation
Renovated
Under Demolition
Demolished
Completed, 2015
Country

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of Country, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

City

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of City, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

Address
Postal Code
10022
Function

A single-function tall building is defined as one where 85% or more of its usable floor area is dedicated to a single usage. Thus a building with 90% office floor area would be said to be an "office" building, irrespective of other minor functions it may also contain.

A mixed-use tall building contains two or more functions (or uses), where each of the functions occupy a significant proportion of the tower's total space. Support areas such as car parks and mechanical plant space do not constitute mixed-use functions. Functions are denoted on CTBUH "Tallest Building" lists in descending order, e.g., "hotel/office" indicates hotel function above office function.

residential
Structural Material

Steel
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from steel. Note that a building of steel construction with a floor system of concrete planks or concrete slab on top of steel beams is still considered a “steel” structure as the concrete elements are not acting as the primary structure.

Reinforced Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from concrete which has been cast in place and utilizes steel reinforcement bars.

Precast Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning system are constructed from steel reinforced concrete which has been precast as individual components and assembled together on-site.

Mixed-Structure
Utilizes distinct systems (e.g. steel, concrete, timber), one on top of the other. For example, a steel/concrete indicates a steel structural system located on top of a concrete structural system, with the opposite true of concrete/steel.

Composite
A combination of materials (e.g. steel, concrete, timber) are used together in the main structural elements. Examples include buildings which utilize: steel columns with a floor system of reinforced concrete beams; a steel frame system with a concrete core; concrete-encased steel columns; concrete-filled steel tubes; etc. Where known, the CTBUH database breaks out the materials used in a composite building’s core, columns, and floor spanning separately.

concrete
Official Website
Height

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

Architectural
425.7 m / 1,397 ft
To Tip
425.7 m / 1,397 ft
Occupied
392.14 m / 1,287 ft
Floors Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

85
Floors Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

3
# of Apartments

Number of Apartments refers to the total number of residential units (including both rental units and condominiums) contained within a particular building.

146
# of Parking Spaces

Number of Parking Spaces refers to the total number of car parking spaces contained within a particular building.

60
# of Elevators

Number of Elevators refers to the total number of elevator cars (not shafts) contained within a particular building (including public, private and freight elevators).

10
Tower GFA

Tower GFA refers to the total gross floor area within the tower footprint, not including adjoining podiums, connected buildings or other towers within the development.

65,497 m² / 705,004 ft²
Rankings
#
27
Tallest in the World
#
5
Tallest in North America
#
5
Tallest in United States
#
4
Tallest in New York City
#
2
Tallest Residential Building in the World
#
2
Tallest Residential Building in North America
#
2
Tallest Residential Building in United States
#
2
Tallest Residential Building in New York City
#
2
Tallest Concrete Building in the World
#
2
Tallest Concrete Building in North America
#
2
Tallest Concrete Building in United States
#
2
Tallest Concrete Building in New York City
Construction Schedule
2011

Proposed

2011

Construction Start

2015

Completed

Owner
56th and Park (NY) Owner, LLC
Developer
CIM Group; Macklowe Properties
Architect
Structural Engineer
MEP Engineer
Contractor

Building Monitoring

Vidaris, Inc.

Energy Concept

Vidaris, Inc.
Enclos Corp.; Vidaris, Inc.

Interiors

Deborah Berke Partners

Landscape

Zion Breen & Richardson Associates

LEED

Vidaris, Inc.

Lighting

HDLC Architectural Lighting Design

Marketing

Wordsearch; Dialog Box Digital

Roofing

Vidaris, Inc.

Wind

Concrete

Ferrara Brothers

Elevator

Façade Maintenance Equipment

Formwork

CTBUH Awards & Distinctions

Best Tall Building Americas 2016 Award of Excellence

2016 CTBUH Awards

CTBUH Initiatives

CTBUH Study Examines Tallest Buildings with Dampers


22 August 2018 - CTBUH Research

“Living Tall” Asks: “What Will Make Tall Buildings More Livable?"


16 November 2017 - Event

Videos

20 October 2016 | New York City

Thursday October 20, 2016. Hong Kong, China. Carol Willis of The Skyscraper Museum in New York City presents at the 2016 China Conference Plenary 7:...

Research

30 July 2018

CTBUH Research

As tall buildings continue to be built in seismically-active and cyclone-prone areas, the need to augment the structures of these buildings with dynamic modification devices...

Global News

27 January 2021 | New York City

“Among the clouds, at one thousand feet, exists an inner floating garden,” reads the first line of the Engel & Völkers Mercedes Berk team’s off-market...

About 432 Park Avenue

The pencil-thin 432 Park Avenue represents a new generation of supertall, superslim skyscrapers. Located in the ever-opulent Midtown neighborhood, the tower is placed in the heart of Manhattan overlooking Central Park. The narrow design of the building is intentional; as Manhattan increases in density, it is becoming ever more important to maximize building heights relative to site area.

Simplicity is the defining trait of 432 Park Avenue. With a series of large glass windows set in a regular grid of exposed concrete members, the building offers few aesthetic frills, but rather rises out of the ground as a singular, white monolith. A flat roof neatly caps the rectangular structure. The straight, clean lines of the building’s façade simultaneously manage to evoke a modern aesthetic, while also reflecting Manhattan’s orderly street grid. Each floor incorporates 24 9.2-square-meter windows that add weight to the structure, creating a sense of visually stability despite its slender frame. The oversized windows will also benefit residents with ample amounts of light and uncontested views.

The building’s outward simplicity belies a complex structural scheme. A regular grid of exposed concrete creates an open basket within which seven “independent buildings” stack up, separated by spaces where building cores are exposed to the outdoor elements. These breaks allow for the deflection of wind pressures and help the building, with its 1:15 slenderness ratio, achieve structural stability.

Taken together, the orderly, almost methodical design of 432 Park Avenue manages to fully harness its small footprint without appearing to dominate its surroundings. It is clear that this type of economical design will have a lasting impact on the future of tall buildings, as it becomes more important to consider the long-term impact of buildings at such extreme height.

CTBUH Awards & Distinctions

Best Tall Building Americas 2016 Award of Excellence

2016 CTBUH Awards

Quick Facts

  • The building has a height to width ration of 15:1.

20 October 2016 | New York City

Thursday October 20, 2016. Hong Kong, China. Carol Willis of The Skyscraper Museum in New York City presents at the 2016 China Conference Plenary 7:...

27 October 2015 | New York City

Carol Willis of Skyscraper Museum is interviewed by Chris Bentley during the 2015 CTBUH New York Conference at the Grand Hyatt New York. Carol discusses...

26 October 2015 | New York City

Harry Macklowe of Macklowe Properties is interviewed by Chris Bentley during the 2015 CTBUH New York Conference at the Grand Hyatt New York. Harry discusses...

26 October 2015 | New York City

Rafael Viñoly of Rafael Viñoly Architects is interviewed by Chris Bentley during the 2015 CTBUH New York Conference at the Grand Hyatt New York. Rafael...

26 October 2015 | New York City

This presentation chronicles the development and design of 432 Park Avenue, New York, which, when it opens will be the tallest residential building in the...

26 October 2015 | New York City

432 Park Avenue, the MoMA Tower and Steinway Tower at 111 West 57th Street are the first of a new generation of supertall buildings in...

30 July 2018

CTBUH Research

As tall buildings continue to be built in seismically-active and cyclone-prone areas, the need to augment the structures of these buildings with dynamic modification devices...

28 July 2018

John Jory, Queensland University of Technology

This paper investigates height-variable phenomena in the urban context, and their relevance to the design and performance of tall buildings. It proposes a design approach...

01 March 2018

Kyoung Sun Moon, Yale University School of Architecture

The emergence of tall buildings in the late 19th century was possible by using new materials and separating the role of structures and that of...

17 October 2016

Carol Willis, The Skyscraper Museum

This paper highlights a new 21st-century skyscraper typology – the very tall and slender residential tower – and analyzes the economic, engineering, and urbanistic forces...

19 January 2016

Jason Gabel, Marty Carver & Marshall Gerometta, CTBUH

CTBUH has determined that 106 buildings of 200 meters’ height or greater were completed around the world in 2015 – setting a new record for...

26 October 2015

Michael Stern, JDS Development Group; Mary Rowe, Municipal Art Society of New York

The recent prevalence of extra-thin and tall “superslim” towers in New York, which mostly contain luxury apartments, has been controversial. We felt it was time...

27 January 2021 | New York City

“Among the clouds, at one thousand feet, exists an inner floating garden,” reads the first line of the Engel & Völkers Mercedes Berk team’s off-market...

06 May 2019 | New York City

Amidst the ongoing evolution of the Manhattan skyline, one of the most notable recent changes has been the completion of the Midtown East rezoning, which...

21 January 2019 | New York City

For decades, the New York City skyline was dominated by one building, the 1,250-foot-tall (381-meter) Empire State Building. But 17 “supertall” skyscrapers — defined as...

22 August 2018

CTBUH Study Examines Tallest Buildings with Dampers

CTBUH has released a Tall Buildings in Numbers (TBIN) interactive data study on the world's tallest buildings with dampers.

16 November 2017

“Living Tall” Asks: “What Will Make Tall Buildings More Livable?"

The third installment of the CTBUH / Chicago Architecture Foundation’s (CAF) joint skyscraper lecture series brought together a diverse group of tall building experts.

19 December 2016

Top 12 Happenings of 2016, Month-by-Month

Check out the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat's top stories of 2016 for each month and take a look ahead with the Council’s monthly predictions for 2017.

13 October 2016

The Council is pleased to announce the Top Company Rankings for numerous disciplines as derived from the list of projects appearing in 100 of the World’s Tallest Buildings.

22 June 2016

CTBUH is proud to announce the winners and finalists for the CTBUH 2016 Tall Building Awards, chosen from a pool of 132 submissions vying for recognition.

13 January 2016

CTBUH Announces 100 Supertalls Completed Worldwide

There are now officially 100 supertall (300-plus-meter) skyscrapers in the world following the completion of 432 Park Avenue in New York City.