908
Global
Height rank
7 World Trade Center
New York City
Height
1
To Tip:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).

226.5 m / 743 ft
2
Architectural:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

226.5 m / 743 ft
3
Occupied:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest occupied floor within the building.

206.8 m / 679 ft
1 2 3 7 World Trade Center Outline
Floors
Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

49
Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

1
Height 226.5 m / 743.1 ft
Floors 49
Official Name

The current legal building name.

7 World Trade Center
Name of Complex

A complex is a group of buildings which are designed and built as pieces of a greater development.

Type

CTBUH collects data on two major types of tall structures: 'Buildings' and 'Telecommunications / Observation Towers.' A 'Building' is a structure where at least 50% of the height is occupied by usable floor area. A 'Telecommunications / Observation Tower' is a structure where less than 50% of the structure's height is occupied by usable floor area. Only 'Buildings' are eligible for the CTBUH 'Tallest Buildings' lists.

Building
Status
Completed
Architecturally Topped Out
Structurally Topped Out
Under Construction
Proposed
On Hold
Never Completed
Vision
Competition Entry
Canceled
Proposed Renovation
Under Renovation
Renovated
Under Demolition
Demolished
Completed, 2006
Country

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of Country, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

City

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of City, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

Postal Code
10048
Function

A single-function tall building is defined as one where 85% or more of its usable floor area is dedicated to a single usage. Thus a building with 90% office floor area would be said to be an "office" building, irrespective of other minor functions it may also contain.

A mixed-use tall building contains two or more functions (or uses), where each of the functions occupy a significant proportion of the tower's total space. Support areas such as car parks and mechanical plant space do not constitute mixed-use functions. Functions are denoted on CTBUH "Tallest Building" lists in descending order, e.g., "hotel/office" indicates hotel function above office function.

office
Structural Material

Steel
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from steel. Note that a building of steel construction with a floor system of concrete planks or concrete slab on top of steel beams is still considered a “steel” structure as the concrete elements are not acting as the primary structure.

Reinforced Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from concrete which has been cast in place and utilizes steel reinforcement bars.

Precast Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning system are constructed from steel reinforced concrete which has been precast as individual components and assembled together on-site.

Mixed-Structure
Utilizes distinct systems (e.g. steel, concrete, timber), one on top of the other. For example, a steel/concrete indicates a steel structural system located on top of a concrete structural system, with the opposite true of concrete/steel.

Composite
A combination of materials (e.g. steel, concrete, timber) are used together in the main structural elements. Examples include buildings which utilize: steel columns with a floor system of reinforced concrete beams; a steel frame system with a concrete core; concrete-encased steel columns; concrete-filled steel tubes; etc. Where known, the CTBUH database breaks out the materials used in a composite building’s core, columns, and floor spanning separately.

steel/concrete
Energy Label
LEED Gold
Official Website
Architectural

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

226.5 m / 743.1 ft
To Tip

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).

226.5 m / 743.1 ft
Occupied

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest occupied floor within the building.

206.8 m / 678.5 ft
Floors Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

49
Floors Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

1
# of Elevators

Number of Elevators refers to the total number of elevator cars (not shafts) contained within a particular building (including public, private and freight elevators).

29
Tower GFA

Tower GFA refers to the total gross floor area within the tower footprint, not including adjoining podiums, connected buildings or other towers within the development.

156,181 m² / 1,681,118 ft²
Rankings
#
908
Tallest in the World
#
144
Tallest in North America
#
125
Tallest in United States
#
55
Tallest in New York City
#
409
Tallest Office Building in the World
#
86
Tallest Office Building in North America
#
78
Tallest Office Building in United States
#
28
Tallest Office Building in New York City
#
28
Tallest Mixed-material Building in the World
#
8
Tallest Mixed-material Building in North America
#
8
Tallest Mixed-material Building in United States
#
5
Tallest Mixed-material Building in New York City
Construction Schedule
2002

Construction Start

2006

Completed

Architect
Design

Usually involved in the front end design, with a "typical" condition being that of a leadership role through either Schematic Design or Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Structural Engineer
Design

The Design Engineer is usually involved in the front end design, typically taking the leadership role in the Schematic Design and Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

MEP Engineer
Design

The Design Engineer is usually involved in the front end design, typically taking the leadership role in the Schematic Design and Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Contractor
Main Contractor

The main contractor is the supervisory contractor of all construction work on a project, management of sub-contractors and vendors, etc. May be referred to as "Construction Manager," however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Main Contractor" exclusively.

Other Consultant

Other Consultant refers to other organizations which provided significant consultation services for a building project (e.g. wind consultants, environmental consultants, fire and life safety consultants, etc).

Environmental
Façade

These are firms that consult on the design of a building's façade. May often be referred to as "Cladding," "Envelope," "Exterior Wall," or "Curtain Wall" Consultant, however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Façade Consultant" exclusively.

Owner
Port Authority of New York and New Jersey; Silverstein Properties
Developer
Silverstein Properties
Architect
Design

Usually involved in the front end design, with a "typical" condition being that of a leadership role through either Schematic Design or Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Structural Engineer
Design

The Design Engineer is usually involved in the front end design, typically taking the leadership role in the Schematic Design and Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

MEP Engineer
Design

The Design Engineer is usually involved in the front end design, typically taking the leadership role in the Schematic Design and Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Contractor
Main Contractor

The main contractor is the supervisory contractor of all construction work on a project, management of sub-contractors and vendors, etc. May be referred to as "Construction Manager," however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Main Contractor" exclusively.

Other Consultant

Other Consultant refers to other organizations which provided significant consultation services for a building project (e.g. wind consultants, environmental consultants, fire and life safety consultants, etc).

Building Monitoring
Vidaris, Inc.
Civil
Philip Habib & Associates
Energy Concept
Vidaris, Inc.
Environmental
Façade

These are firms that consult on the design of a building's façade. May often be referred to as "Cladding," "Envelope," "Exterior Wall," or "Curtain Wall" Consultant, however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Façade Consultant" exclusively.

Permasteelisa Group; Vidaris, Inc.
Roofing
Vidaris, Inc.
Material Supplier

Material Supplier refers to organizations which supplied significant systems/materials for a building project (e.g. elevator suppliers, facade suppliers, etc).

Fire Proofing
Grace Construction Products

Videos

26 October 2015 | New York City

Developing Tall in the New York Context

Gary Barnett, Extell Development Corporation; Ric Clark, Brookfield Properties; Joseph Moinian, Moinian Group; and Larry Silverstein, Silverstein Properties, discuss development in New York City and...

Research

26 October 2015

Integrated and Intelligent Buildings: An Imperative to People, the Planet and the Bottom Line

Kelly Romano, Mead Rusert & Hayden Reeve, United Technologies Corporation

With the impact of urbanization, larger cities, operating pressures and the rise of megatall skyscrapers, today’s new and existing buildings are increasingly being engineered as...

About 7 World Trade Center

7 World Trade Center is located just north of the main site of the World Trade Center. With Lower Manhattan struggling to maintain its vitality as a leading business district before the rebuilding of the World Trade Center proper, 7 World Trade Center helped to jump-start the neighborhood’s resurgence both economically and sym-bolically after 9/11. The footprint of the old 1980s-era building was pulled back to open up Greenwich Street, restoring the view corridor from Tribeca to the island’s southern tip that had been blocked since the 70s, and creating a new public park.

The tower is notable for its innovative detailing and formal restraint. Artist James Carpenter worked with the architectural design team to create a curtain wall whose curved spandrels and reflective sills produce a unique optical effect. Both smaller and airier than its predecessor, the 52-story slender glass pylon sits atop transformer vaults which supply electricity to millions of users.

To accommodate the transformers’ intense airflow requirement, the podium wrapper is designed as a breathing, stainless steel surface that gleams by day and glows at night. Behind the podium screen are blue and white LED fixtures linked to motion sensors which vary the wall’s illumination in the evening as pedestrians pass by.

A special outside air intake system, which filters outdoor air (and air-conditioned air) through an activated carbon filtration sys-tem, was developed to ventilate all offices, providing a healthier indoor environment for occupants. One of the first projects accepted as part of the U.S. Green Building Council’s Pilot Program for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) for Core and Shell Development, 7 World Trade Center is the first LEED Gold certified high-rise office building in New York City. The tower is also a model for life safety, with a reinforced concrete core, steel superstructure, and safety enhancements that exceed NYC building codes.

Standing tall as a simple yet nuanced contribution to the Manhattan cityscape, 7 World Trade Center sets a new standard for high-rise structures as it announces the Financial District’s sustainable resurgence.

26 October 2015 | New York City

Developing Tall in the New York Context

Gary Barnett, Extell Development Corporation; Ric Clark, Brookfield Properties; Joseph Moinian, Moinian Group; and Larry Silverstein, Silverstein Properties, discuss development in New York City and...

11 October 2011 | New York City

One World Trade Center: A New Icon Rises at Ground Zero

Nicholas Holt from SOM New York presents on re-establishing the culture grid after the effects of September 11th. He speaks on the master plan, how...

26 October 2015

Integrated and Intelligent Buildings: An Imperative to People, the Planet and the Bottom Line

Kelly Romano, Mead Rusert & Hayden Reeve, United Technologies Corporation

With the impact of urbanization, larger cities, operating pressures and the rise of megatall skyscrapers, today’s new and existing buildings are increasingly being engineered as...

01 August 2011

Revitalizing Lower Manhattan: World Trade Center in Context

Jan Klerks, CTBUH

Almost 10 years after the destruction of the Twin Towers, the reconstruction of the World Trade Center site is in full swing. One World Trade...

28 October 2015

CTBUH 2015 delegates toured the World Trade Center: 3, 4 and 7, all of which are in the middle of construction.

28 October 2015

CTBUH 2015 delegates toured 30 Park Place which will house the Four Seasons Hotel and Private Residences Downtown New York.

16 September 2014

Building Movement and Damping Workshop, Shanghai 2014

The Building Movement and Damping Technical Workshop reviewed some of the latest strategies and concepts for helping tall buildings avoid movement in seismic and wind events.

21 May 2014

CTBUH Visits 1WTC, 4WTC and 7WTC

Just six months after CTBUH confirmed One World Trade Center's height, Executive Director Antony Wood and Events Manager Jessica Rinkel toured the building.

3 April 2011

World Trade Center Tour Report

Almost ten years after the destruction of the twin towers, we can now see that the reconstruction of the World Trade Center site is in full swing.