76
Global
Height rank
ADNOC Headquarters
Abu Dhabi
Height

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

1
To Tip:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).

342 m / 1,122 ft
2
Architectural:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

342 m / 1,122 ft
3
Occupied:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest occupied floor within the building.

294 m / 965 ft
1 2 3 ADNOC Headquarters Outline
Floors

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

65
Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

2
Height 342 m / 1,122 ft
Floors 65
Official Name

The current legal building name.

ADNOC Headquarters
Other Names

Other names the building has commonly been known as, including former names, common informal names, local names, etc.

Abu Dhabi National Oil Company Headquarters
Type

CTBUH collects data on two major types of tall structures: 'Buildings' and 'Telecommunications / Observation Towers.' A 'Building' is a structure where at least 50% of the height is occupied by usable floor area. A 'Telecommunications / Observation Tower' is a structure where less than 50% of the structure's height is occupied by usable floor area. Only 'Buildings' are eligible for the CTBUH 'Tallest Buildings' lists.

Building
Status
Completed
Architecturally Topped Out
Structurally Topped Out
Under Construction
Proposed
On Hold
Never Completed
Vision
Competition Entry
Canceled
Proposed Renovation
Under Renovation
Renovated
Under Demolition
Demolished
Completed, 2015
Country

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of Country, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

City

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of City, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

Function

A single-function tall building is defined as one where 85% or more of its usable floor area is dedicated to a single usage. Thus a building with 90% office floor area would be said to be an "office" building, irrespective of other minor functions it may also contain.

A mixed-use tall building contains two or more functions (or uses), where each of the functions occupy a significant proportion of the tower's total space. Support areas such as car parks and mechanical plant space do not constitute mixed-use functions. Functions are denoted on CTBUH "Tallest Building" lists in descending order, e.g., "hotel/office" indicates hotel function above office function.

office
Structural Material

Steel
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from steel. Note that a building of steel construction with a floor system of concrete planks or concrete slab on top of steel beams is still considered a “steel” structure as the concrete elements are not acting as the primary structure.

Reinforced Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from concrete which has been cast in place and utilizes steel reinforcement bars.

Precast Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning system are constructed from steel reinforced concrete which has been precast as individual components and assembled together on-site.

Mixed-Structure
Utilizes distinct systems (e.g. steel, concrete, timber), one on top of the other. For example, a steel/concrete indicates a steel structural system located on top of a concrete structural system, with the opposite true of concrete/steel.

Composite
A combination of materials (e.g. steel, concrete, timber) are used together in the main structural elements. Examples include buildings which utilize: steel columns with a floor system of reinforced concrete beams; a steel frame system with a concrete core; concrete-encased steel columns; concrete-filled steel tubes; etc. Where known, the CTBUH database breaks out the materials used in a composite building’s core, columns, and floor spanning separately.

concrete
LEED Gold BD+C: New Construction
Height

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

Architectural
342 m / 1,122 ft
To Tip
342 m / 1,122 ft
Occupied
294 m / 965 ft
Floors Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

65
Floors Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

2
Rankings
#
76
Tallest in the World
#
16
Tallest in Middle East
#
14
Tallest in United Arab Emirates
#
2
Tallest in Abu Dhabi
#
29
Tallest Office Building in the World
#
4
Tallest Office Building in Middle East
#
3
Tallest Office Building in United Arab Emirates
#
1
Tallest Office Building in Abu Dhabi
#
22
Tallest Concrete Building in the World
#
11
Tallest Concrete Building in Middle East
#
10
Tallest Concrete Building in United Arab Emirates
#
2
Tallest Concrete Building in Abu Dhabi
Construction Schedule
2009

Construction Start

2015

Completed

Owner/Developer
Abu Dhabi National Oil Company
Architect
Structural Engineer
CH2M HILL
MEP Engineer
Contractor

Acoustics

Shen Milsom Wilke, Inc.

Building Monitoring

Fire

Arup; Telecom

Helipad/Aviation

Ricondo

Lighting

PHA Lighting Design

Security

Vertical Transportation

Ayling Consulting Services Inc

Wind

BMT Fluid Mechanics Ltd.

Cladding

ASCON; Nikolaus Bagnara S.p.A.; Rock of Ages; Kuraray; Jangho Group Co., Ltd.

Façade Maintenance Equipment

Fire Proofing

Grace Construction Products

Paint/Coating

Steel

Eversendai Engineering Qatar

CTBUH Initiatives

Research

25 April 2019

Dr. Philip Oldfield, UNSW Sydney; Bronte Doherty, BVN Architecture

This research explores the trends, drivers and frequency of offset cores in the world’s tallest buildings. It charts the history of tall building layouts, exploring...

About ADNOC Headquarters

Abu Dhabi National Oil Company (ADNOC), developed ADNOC Headquarters on Corniche Road in a prestigious area of Abu Dhabi, highlighting the company’s international influence and its economic centrality to the oil-producing region. The structure’s design makes the most of the site’s central location through careful massing of the tower and calculated placement of the courts, plazas, and landscaping surrounding the tower to allow for the superior vistas from the building.

The commercial office tower has a sleek and slender design, rising from a parallelogram-shaped site. The tower’s north-south orientation minimizes the ground-level footprint, leaving ample room for landscaped amenity space. Most public functions such as conference rooms, reception and restrooms are zoned towards the south facing façade which features a double glazed exterior skin that protects the building occupants from harsh solar exposure, and allows a more filtered daylight infiltration. The building’s most remarkable feature is an arciform square opening crowning the tower.

A unique engineering challenge faced was that the center of the tower’s mass is offset by three meters due to the fact that the south core walls are only counterbalanced by six slender composite columns. Structural columns filled with high strength concrete and 20% of original steel to achieve adequate stiffness.

A very unusual curved auditorium beside the tower acts as a contrasting stylistic facet to the boxy podium projecting out from the base of the tower. Extending south of the tower, a three-story rectangular podium houses retail space, the service loading area, a heritage museum, and the main lobby. The podium’s roof extends south across the access road to connect to a new mosque. To maximize flexibility, office spaces are thoughtfully organized using a modular approach that allows for the spaces to be easily modified and exchanged.

25 April 2019

Dr. Philip Oldfield, UNSW Sydney; Bronte Doherty, BVN Architecture

This research explores the trends, drivers and frequency of offset cores in the world’s tallest buildings. It charts the history of tall building layouts, exploring...

25 April 2019

CTBUH Research

There has long been an interest in separating the service cores of tall buildings from the main programmed areas – to create more column-free, easily-configured...

19 January 2016

Jason Gabel, Marty Carver & Marshall Gerometta, CTBUH

CTBUH has determined that 106 buildings of 200 meters’ height or greater were completed around the world in 2015 – setting a new record for...

31 December 2014

Daniel Safarik, Antony Wood, Marty Carver & Marshall Gerometta, CTBUH

An All-Time Record 97 Buildings of 200 Meters or Higher Completed in 2014 and 2014 showed further shifts towards Asia, and also surprising developments in...

13 October 2016

The Council is pleased to announce the Top Company Rankings for numerous disciplines as derived from the list of projects appearing in 100 of the World’s Tallest Buildings.

19 January 2016

CTBUH has determined that 106 buildings of 200 meters’ height or greater were completed around the world in 2015 – setting a new record for annual tall building completions.

31 December 2014

An All-Time Record 97 Buildings of 200 Meters or Higher Completed in 2014 and 2014 showed further shifts towards Asia, and also surprising developments in building functions and structural materials.