Greenland Group Suzhou Center
Suzhou
Height

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

1
To Tip:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).

358 m / 1,175 ft
2
Architectural:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

358 m / 1,175 ft
3
Occupied:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest occupied floor within the building.

328.8 m / 1,079 ft
1 2 3 Greenland Group Suzhou Center Outline
Floors

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

77
Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

3
Height 358 m / 1,175 ft
Floors 77
Official Name

The current legal building name.

Greenland Group Suzhou Center
Type

CTBUH collects data on two major types of tall structures: 'Buildings' and 'Telecommunications / Observation Towers.' A 'Building' is a structure where at least 50% of the height is occupied by usable floor area. A 'Telecommunications / Observation Tower' is a structure where less than 50% of the structure's height is occupied by usable floor area. Only 'Buildings' are eligible for the CTBUH 'Tallest Buildings' lists.

Building
Status
Completed
Architecturally Topped Out
Structurally Topped Out
Under Construction
Proposed
On Hold
Never Completed
Vision
Competition Entry
Canceled
Proposed Renovation
Under Renovation
Renovated
Under Demolition
Demolished
Architecturally Topped Out, 2021
Country

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of Country, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

City

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of City, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

Address
Function

A single-function tall building is defined as one where 85% or more of its usable floor area is dedicated to a single usage. Thus a building with 90% office floor area would be said to be an "office" building, irrespective of other minor functions it may also contain.

A mixed-use tall building contains two or more functions (or uses), where each of the functions occupy a significant proportion of the tower's total space. Support areas such as car parks and mechanical plant space do not constitute mixed-use functions. Functions are denoted on CTBUH "Tallest Building" lists in descending order, e.g., "hotel/office" indicates hotel function above office function.

hotel / office
Structural Material

Steel
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from steel. Note that a building of steel construction with a floor system of concrete planks or concrete slab on top of steel beams is still considered a “steel” structure as the concrete elements are not acting as the primary structure.

Reinforced Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from concrete which has been cast in place and utilizes steel reinforcement bars.

Precast Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning system are constructed from steel reinforced concrete which has been precast as individual components and assembled together on-site.

Mixed-Structure
Utilizes distinct systems (e.g. steel, concrete, timber), one on top of the other. For example, a steel/concrete indicates a steel structural system located on top of a concrete structural system, with the opposite true of concrete/steel.

Composite
A combination of materials (e.g. steel, concrete, timber) are used together in the main structural elements. Examples include buildings which utilize: steel columns with a floor system of reinforced concrete beams; a steel frame system with a concrete core; concrete-encased steel columns; concrete-filled steel tubes; etc. Where known, the CTBUH database breaks out the materials used in a composite building’s core, columns, and floor spanning separately.

composite
Core
Reinforced Concrete
Columns
Concrete Encased Steel
Floor Spanning
Steel
Height

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

Architectural
358 m / 1,175 ft
To Tip
358 m / 1,175 ft
Occupied
328.8 m / 1,079 ft
Floors Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

77
Floors Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

3
Construction Schedule
2011

Proposed

2014

Construction Start

2021

Completed

Developer
Greenland Group
Architect
Structural Engineer
MEP Engineer

Acoustics

Shen Milsom Wilke, Inc.

Façade Maintenance

Landscape

Lighting

CD+M Lighting Design Group, LLC

Vertical Transportation

Wind

Ceiling

Armstrong World Industries

CTBUH Initiatives

Greenland's Suzhou Center Chosen as Featured Building


1 October 2012 - Featured Building

Videos

20 September 2012 | Suzhou

ZhaoHui Jia of Greenland Group is interviewed by Jeff Herzer during the 2012 CTBUH Shanghai Congress at the Jin Mao, Shanghai. ZhaoHui Jia discusses several...

Research

23 September 2012

Ross Wimer, William Baker, Mark Nagis & Aaron Mazeika, SOM

At 358 meters, Greenland Group Suzhou Center marks the Wujiang waterfront with an aerodynamic form that has a unique presence, while accommodating its program with...

Global News

14 May 2019 | Shanghai

Real estate developer Greenland Group has unveiled a master plan for its mega mixed-use project in Shanghai’s downtown Huangpu District, which is set to become...

About Greenland Group Suzhou Center

Greenland Group Suzhou Center, sited prominently along Lake Taihu, is the defining visual landmark for the new Wujiang lakefront development. With an explicit focus on reducing energy consumption and conserving water, the Greenland Group Suzhou Center employs high-efficiency measures and intelligent structural modifications to minimize the building’s environmental impact. The tower is anticipated to achieve a LEED Silver designation.

Architects used highly advanced aerodynamic digital modeling techniques to craft the shape of the tower, which contributes to the building’s sustainable performance. The design was subjected to a series of digital wind tests that allowed the form to be refined. Convex primary façades and concave short façades have been shaped to decrease the building’s structural loads and increase natural ventilation flow. Operable panels have also been tucked into the corners of the east and west atrium façades at each floor to allow for cross ventilation when weather allows.

The building’s dynamic tapering form effectively unifies its office and residential uses within a gently curved volume that culminates in a 30-story-tall opening, a feature that marks the tower’s presence on the city skyline. Acting as a “lung,” the enormous aperture invites cool air flow during summer months and floods the interior spaces with natural light.

The atrium’s façade maximizes daylight penetration, facilitates mixed mode ventilation in the lobbies and public spaces, and acts as a fresh air supply source for the hotel and serviced apartments. Like many expanding cities, poor air quality presents an environmental challenge in Wujiang. Since the greatest concentration of pollutants can be found at lower elevations, fresh air will be supplied through enormous openings at the top of the tower.

Taken as a whole, the Greenland Group Suzhou Center marks the intersection of elegant design and function, employing advanced technologies to minimize the building’s footprint on the environment.

20 September 2012 | Suzhou

ZhaoHui Jia of Greenland Group is interviewed by Jeff Herzer during the 2012 CTBUH Shanghai Congress at the Jin Mao, Shanghai. ZhaoHui Jia discusses several...

23 September 2012

Ross Wimer, William Baker, Mark Nagis & Aaron Mazeika, SOM

At 358 meters, Greenland Group Suzhou Center marks the Wujiang waterfront with an aerodynamic form that has a unique presence, while accommodating its program with...

14 May 2019 | Shanghai

Real estate developer Greenland Group has unveiled a master plan for its mega mixed-use project in Shanghai’s downtown Huangpu District, which is set to become...

13 October 2016

The Council is pleased to announce the Top Company Rankings for numerous disciplines as derived from the list of projects appearing in 100 of the World’s Tallest Buildings.

1 October 2012

Greenland's Suzhou Center Chosen as Featured Building

The latest project in the long partnership between SOM and the Greenland Group is a 358-meter tower in Wujiang.