105
Global
Height rank
Keangnam Hanoi Landmark Tower
Hanoi Vietnam
Height

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

1
To Tip:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).

349 m / 1,145 ft
2
Architectural:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

328.6 m / 1,078 ft
3
Occupied:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest occupied floor within the building.

309.9 m / 1,017 ft
1 2 3 Keangnam Hanoi Landmark Tower Outline
Floors

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

72
Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

2
Height 328.6 m / 1,078 ft
Floors 72
Official Name

The current legal building name.

Keangnam Hanoi Landmark Tower
Other Names

Other names the building has commonly been known as, including former names, common informal names, local names, etc.

Landmark 72
Name of Complex

A complex is a group of buildings which are designed and built as pieces of a greater development.

Type

CTBUH collects data on two major types of tall structures: 'Buildings' and 'Telecommunications / Observation Towers.' A 'Building' is a structure where at least 50% of the height is occupied by usable floor area. A 'Telecommunications / Observation Tower' is a structure where less than 50% of the structure's height is occupied by usable floor area. Only 'Buildings' are eligible for the CTBUH 'Tallest Buildings' lists.

Building
Status
Completed
Architecturally Topped Out
Structurally Topped Out
Under Construction
Proposed
On Hold
Never Completed
Vision
Competition Entry
Canceled
Proposed Renovation
Under Renovation
Renovated
Under Demolition
Demolished
Completed, 2012
Country

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of Country, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

City

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of City, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

Address
Function

A single-function tall building is defined as one where 85% or more of its usable floor area is dedicated to a single usage. Thus a building with 90% office floor area would be said to be an "office" building, irrespective of other minor functions it may also contain.

A mixed-use tall building contains two or more functions (or uses), where each of the functions occupy a significant proportion of the tower's total space. Support areas such as car parks and mechanical plant space do not constitute mixed-use functions. Functions are denoted on CTBUH "Tallest Building" lists in descending order, e.g., "hotel/office" indicates hotel function above office function.

hotel / residential / office
Structural Material

Steel
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from steel. Note that a building of steel construction with a floor system of concrete planks or concrete slab on top of steel beams is still considered a “steel” structure as the concrete elements are not acting as the primary structure.

Reinforced Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from concrete which has been cast in place and utilizes steel reinforcement bars.

Precast Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning system are constructed from steel reinforced concrete which has been precast as individual components and assembled together on-site.

Mixed-Structure
Utilizes distinct systems (e.g. steel, concrete, timber), one on top of the other. For example, a steel/concrete indicates a steel structural system located on top of a concrete structural system, with the opposite true of concrete/steel.

Composite
A combination of materials (e.g. steel, concrete, timber) are used together in the main structural elements. Examples include buildings which utilize: steel columns with a floor system of reinforced concrete beams; a steel frame system with a concrete core; concrete-encased steel columns; concrete-filled steel tubes; etc. Where known, the CTBUH database breaks out the materials used in a composite building’s core, columns, and floor spanning separately.

concrete
Height

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

Architectural
328.6 m / 1,078 ft
To Tip
349 m / 1,145 ft
Occupied
309.9 m / 1,017 ft
Observatory
309.9 m / 1,017 ft
Floors Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

72
Floors Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

2
# of Apartments

Number of Apartments refers to the total number of residential units (including both rental units and condominiums) contained within a particular building.

300
# of Hotel Rooms

Number of Hotel Rooms refers to the total number of hotel rooms contained within a particular building.

383
Rankings
#
105
Tallest in the World
#
65
Tallest in Asia
#
2
Tallest in Vietnam
#
1
Tallest in Hanoi
#
53
Tallest Mixed-use Building in the World
#
39
Tallest Mixed-use Building in Asia
#
2
Tallest Mixed-use Building in Vietnam
#
1
Tallest Mixed-use Building in Hanoi
#
30
Tallest Concrete Building in the World
#
8
Tallest Concrete Building in Asia
#
1
Tallest Concrete Building in Vietnam
#
1
Tallest Concrete Building in Hanoi
Construction Schedule
2008

Construction Start

2012

Completed

Owner

Current

AON Holdings

Past

Qatar Investment Authority
Architect
Heerim Architects & Planners; HOK, Inc.; Samoo Architects & Engineers
Structural Engineer
Parsons Brinckerhoff Consultants Private Limited
Keangnam Enterprise

Wind

BMT Fluid Mechanics Ltd.

Elevator

thyssenkrupp

Sealants

Dow Corning Corporation

CTBUH Initiatives

31 December 2012 - CTBUH Journal

Videos

03 March 2008 | Hanoi

Matthias A. Olt & James P. Rothwell of Callison, discussed two high-rise towers in South Korea and Vietnam at the CTBUH 8th World Congress in...

Research

01 September 2017

Kwangryang Chung, Jungwoo Park & Younghye Kim, Dong Yang Structural Engineers Co., Ltd; Dohun Kim, POSCO E&C

It’s been a decade since post-tension system began to be applied in earnest to buildings in Korea. In the meantime, posttension system has been used...

See more

Global News

26 April 2019 | Hong Kong

Mirae Asset Daewoo announced April 25 that it will underwrite mezzanine debt worth US$243 million for the Goldin Financial Global Center located in Kowloon Bay....

About Keangnam Hanoi Landmark Tower

Upon completion in 2012, Keangnam Hanoi Landmark Tower was the tallest building in Vietnam and was a redefining moment for the city of Hanoi, which at the time had very few tall buildings. The 72 story building is comprised of offices and is the tallest in a three building complex featuring two 49 story residential towers with curved facades to maximize views. While the complex is located on the western edge of the city, the placement positions the development within the center of a newly established central business district.

In order to construct the complex in the soft soils of Hanoi, 980 piles with diameters of up to two meters across were drilled deep underground in a process which took longer than one full year during the construction phase. The reinforced concrete frame of the 72 story tower utilized post-tensioning which allowed the structure to rise as quickly as of one floor every five days, a rate which is faster than what would have occurred with conventional construction techniques. Cladding the tower is a double glazed façade, producing a desired modern aesthetic for the exterior which combined with an intelligent building systems technology, provides a high level of energy efficiency. At the peak of construction, the worksite employed as many as 8000 people at one time.

The base of the Keangnam Hanoi Landmark Tower is attached to a shared podium structure containing shops, a department store and a cinema from which all three towers then rise. The main tower then is comprised of offices on floors 12-46, serviced apartments on floors 48-60 and a full service hotel on floors 62-70. The uppermost 72nd floor contains an observatory with a panoramic view of Hanoi and its rapidly growing skyline.

03 March 2008 | Hanoi

Matthias A. Olt & James P. Rothwell of Callison, discussed two high-rise towers in South Korea and Vietnam at the CTBUH 8th World Congress in...

01 September 2017

Kwangryang Chung, Jungwoo Park & Younghye Kim, Dong Yang Structural Engineers Co., Ltd; Dohun Kim, POSCO E&C

It’s been a decade since post-tension system began to be applied in earnest to buildings in Korea. In the meantime, posttension system has been used...

31 December 2012

Kevin Brass, Antony Wood & Marty Carver, CTBUH

For the first time in six years the number of tall buildings completed annually around the world declined as the effects of the global financial...

26 April 2019 | Hong Kong

Mirae Asset Daewoo announced April 25 that it will underwrite mezzanine debt worth US$243 million for the Goldin Financial Global Center located in Kowloon Bay....

31 December 2012

For the first time in six years the number of tall buildings completed annually around the world declined as the effects of the global financial crisis became evident.