726
Global
Height rank

The Bow

Calgary
Height
1
To Tip:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).

237.5 m / 779 ft
2
Architectural:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

237.5 m / 779 ft
3
Occupied:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest occupied floor within the building.

216.7 m / 711 ft
1 2 3 The Bow Outline
Floors
Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

57
Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

6
Height 237.5 m / 779 ft
Floors 57
Official Name
The current legal building name.

The Bow

Other Names
Other names the building has commonly been known as, including former names, common informal names, local names, etc.

EnCana Headquarters

Type
CTBUH collects data on two major types of tall structures: 'Buildings' and 'Telecommunications / Observation Towers.' A 'Building' is a structure where at least 50% of the height is occupied by usable floor area. A 'Telecommunications / Observation Tower' is a structure where less than 50% of the structure's height is occupied by usable floor area. Only 'Buildings' are eligible for the CTBUH 'Tallest Buildings' lists.

Building

Status
Completed
Architecturally Topped Out
Structurally Topped Out
Under Construction
Proposed
On Hold
Never Completed
Vision
Competition Entry
Canceled
Proposed Renovation
Under Renovation
Renovated
Under Demolition
Demolished

Completed

Completion

2012

Country
The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of Country, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

Canada

City
The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of City, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

Calgary

Function
A single-function tall building is defined as one where 85% or more of its usable floor area is dedicated to a single usage. Thus a building with 90% office floor area would be said to be an "office" building, irrespective of other minor functions it may also contain.

A mixed-use tall building contains two or more functions (or uses), where each of the functions occupy a significant proportion of the tower's total space. Support areas such as car parks and mechanical plant space do not constitute mixed-use functions. Functions are denoted on CTBUH "Tallest Building" lists in descending order, e.g., "hotel/office" indicates hotel function above office function.

office

Structural Material
Steel
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from steel. Note that a building of steel construction with a floor system of concrete planks or concrete slab on top of steel beams is still considered a “steel” structure as the concrete elements are not acting as the primary structure.

Reinforced Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from concrete which has been cast in place and utilizes steel reinforcement bars.

Precast Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning system are constructed from steel reinforced concrete which has been precast as individual components and assembled together on-site.

Mixed-Structure
Utilizes distinct systems (e.g. steel, concrete, timber), one on top of the other. For example, a steel/concrete indicates a steel structural system located on top of a concrete structural system, with the opposite true of concrete/steel.

Composite
A combination of materials (e.g. steel, concrete, timber) are used together in the main structural elements. Examples include buildings which utilize: steel columns with a floor system of reinforced concrete beams; a steel frame system with a concrete core; concrete-encased steel columns; concrete-filled steel tubes; etc. Where known, the CTBUH database breaks out the materials used in a composite building’s core, columns, and floor spanning separately.

steel

Official Website

The Bow

Height
Architectural
Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

237.5 m / 779 ft

To Tip
Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).
237.5 m / 779 ft
Occupied
Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest occupied floor within the building.
216.7 m / 711 ft
Floors Above Ground
The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

57

Floors Below Ground
The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

6

# of Parking Spaces
Number of Parking Spaces refers to the total number of car parking spaces contained within a particular building.

1360

# of Elevators
Number of Elevators refers to the total number of elevator cars (not shafts) contained within a particular building (including public, private and freight elevators).

39

Top Elevator Speed
Top Elevator Speed refers to the top speed capable of being achieved by an elevator within a particular building, measured in meters per second.

7.11 m/s

Tower GFA
Tower GFA refers to the total gross floor area within the tower footprint, not including adjoining podiums, connected buildings or other towers within the development.

199,781 m² / 2,150,425 ft²

Rankings
#
726
Tallest in the World
#
104
Tallest in North America
#
11
Tallest in Canada
#
2
Tallest in Calgary
#
325
Tallest Office Building in the World
#
59
Tallest Office Building in North America
#
7
Tallest Office Building in Canada
#
2
Tallest Office Building in Calgary
#
55
Tallest Steel Building in the World
#
30
Tallest Steel Building in North America
#
2
Tallest Steel Building in Canada
#
1
Tallest Steel Building in Calgary
Construction Schedule
2005

Proposed

2007

Construction Start

2012

Completed

Architect
Design

Usually involved in the front end design, with a "typical" condition being that of a leadership role through either Schematic Design or Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Architect of Record

Usually takes on the balance of the architectural effort not executed by the "Design Architect," typically responsible for the construction documents, conforming to local codes, etc. May often be referred to as "Executive," "Associate," or "Local" Architect, however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Architect of Record" exclusively.

MEP Engineer
Design

The Design Engineer is usually involved in the front end design, typically taking the leadership role in the Schematic Design and Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Contractor
Main Contractor

The main contractor is the supervisory contractor of all construction work on a project, management of sub-contractors and vendors, etc. May be referred to as "Construction Manager," however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Main Contractor" exclusively.

Other Consultant

Other Consultant refers to other organizations which provided significant consultation services for a building project (e.g. wind consultants, environmental consultants, fire and life safety consultants, etc).

Interiors
Wind
Material Supplier

Material Supplier refers to organizations which supplied significant systems/materials for a building project (e.g. elevator suppliers, facade suppliers, etc).

Owner
H&R REIT
Developer
Matthews Southwest
Architect
Design

Usually involved in the front end design, with a "typical" condition being that of a leadership role through either Schematic Design or Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Architect of Record

Usually takes on the balance of the architectural effort not executed by the "Design Architect," typically responsible for the construction documents, conforming to local codes, etc. May often be referred to as "Executive," "Associate," or "Local" Architect, however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Architect of Record" exclusively.

Structural Engineer
Design

The Design Engineer is usually involved in the front end design, typically taking the leadership role in the Schematic Design and Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Halcrow Yolles
MEP Engineer
Design

The Design Engineer is usually involved in the front end design, typically taking the leadership role in the Schematic Design and Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Contractor
Main Contractor

The main contractor is the supervisory contractor of all construction work on a project, management of sub-contractors and vendors, etc. May be referred to as "Construction Manager," however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Main Contractor" exclusively.

Other Consultant

Other Consultant refers to other organizations which provided significant consultation services for a building project (e.g. wind consultants, environmental consultants, fire and life safety consultants, etc).

Interiors
Wind
Material Supplier

Material Supplier refers to organizations which supplied significant systems/materials for a building project (e.g. elevator suppliers, facade suppliers, etc).

Steel

CTBUH Awards & Distinctions

Best Tall Building Americas 2013 Winner

2013 CTBUH Awards

CTBUH Initiatives

Foster + Partners Present on The Bow

7 November 2013 - Awards Symposium Video

Foster + Partners Present on The Bow

7 November 2013 - Awards Symposium Video

Videos

07 November 2013 | Calgary

Best Tall Building Americas: The Bow: Curvature, Sky Gardens & Diagrids

The winner of the Best Tall Building Americas award, The Bow is stunning as a form and functions well from an environmental and urban standpoint....

Research

01 December 2016

An Overview of Structural & Aesthetic Developments in Tall Buildings Using Exterior Bracing & Diagrid Systems

Kheir Al-Kodmany, University of Illinois; Mir M. Ali, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

There is much architectural and engineering literature which discusses the virtues of exterior bracing and diagrid systems in regards to sustainability - two systems which...

About The Bow

The Bow is the first phase of a mixed-use master plan for the regeneration of two entire city blocks on the east side of Centre Street, a major axis through downtown Calgary. Providing a headquarters for a major energy company, its form was shaped by both environmental and organizational analysis. The tower faces south, curving toward the sun to take advantage of daylight and heat, while the resulting bow-shaped plan that gives the tower its name maximizes the perimeter for cellular offices with views of the Rocky Mountains.

The aerodynamic crescent shape significantly reduces exterior wind resistance, downdrafts and urban wind tunnels to create a comfortable public plaza at the tower’s base. At the front of the building, the arc-shaped form helps to define a large civic space. The south-facing plaza will create a popular public space for use all year round. The Bow is significant in terms of the lateral connections it establishes with the surrounding buildings at its lower levels. Calgary is criss-crossed by a system of enclosed walkways which offers a retreat from the city’s harsh winters; the tower is fused to these routes at three points. The second floor is open to the public and integrates shops and cafes. Forming the only public connection over Centre Street, the scheme completes a vital link in the downtown network.

Inside, the shape generates a floor plan that maximizes views and natural light, while providing a flexible, open workspace for its occupants. Where the building curves inwards, the glazed façade is pulled forward to create a series of atria that run the full height of the tower. Three sky gardens, which project into the atria at levels 24, 42 and 54, promote collaboration and bring a social dimension to the office spaces. The gardens feature mature trees, seating, meeting rooms, and local lift cores – at each lobby, passengers travel to local groups of elevators, which serve all the floors within each “garden-level” building zone. This combination of elevator strategy and the incorporation of high-level green spaces encourages interaction and reasserts the social hubs that rise vertically through the building. At level 54, the building features a large 200-seat auditorium.

The atria provide an opportunity for several sustainable strategies that help reduce energy consumption. These spaces act as climatic buffer zones, insulating the building and helping to reduce energy consumption by approximately 30 percent. Excess heat from the office floors is channeled into the atria, while at the same time the sun’s energy (given the atrium’s orientation) is harnessed. The atrium spaces act as a buffer zone between offices adjacent to the atrium and the exterior atrium glass wall, dramatically reducing energy consumption and the need for heating/cooling by exhausting heat upwards in summer and trapping heat in winter. Offices adjacent to the atrium have the ability to open windows into the atrium during the mild seasons.

The orientation of the tower plays a critical role in the reduction of energy consumption. As the atrium façade of the towers faces south-southwest, the tower consumes 11 percent less energy for heating and cooling over the course of a year compared to towers with an atrium façade facing north. Even though the façade is oriented in the direction where the cooling requirement is highest, the solar energy received during the winter season compensates and actually reduces the overall energy requirement.

From a structural standpoint, this is the first time that a triangular diagrid has been applied to a curved skyscraper in North America. The structural system provides superior structural efficiency, while the diagonal and vertical steel frame reduces the overall weight of the steel, and thus the number and size of interior columns, while helping to break down the scale of the building visually.

CTBUH Awards & Distinctions

Best Tall Building Americas 2013 Winner

2013 CTBUH Awards

07 November 2013 | Calgary

Best Tall Building Americas: The Bow: Curvature, Sky Gardens & Diagrids

The winner of the Best Tall Building Americas award, The Bow is stunning as a form and functions well from an environmental and urban standpoint....

07 November 2013 | Calgary

CTBUH 12th Annual Awards Dinner

The 12th Annual Awards Ceremony & Dinner was held in Mies van der Rohe's iconic Crown Hall, on the Illinois Institute of Technology campus, Chicago....

07 November 2013 | Calgary

Interview: The Bow

Jack Matthews and Nigel Dancey discuss The Bow, the Best Tall Building Americas Winner. The stunning form is discussed as a response to the site...

03 March 2008 | Calgary

The Bow: Unique Diagrid Structural System for a Sustainable Tall Building

Barry Charnish, Halcrow Yolles presented the new 59 story “Bow” project for EnCana Corporation at the CTBUH 8th World Congress in Dubai. Once complete, it...

01 December 2016

An Overview of Structural & Aesthetic Developments in Tall Buildings Using Exterior Bracing & Diagrid Systems

Kheir Al-Kodmany, University of Illinois; Mir M. Ali, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

There is much architectural and engineering literature which discusses the virtues of exterior bracing and diagrid systems in regards to sustainability - two systems which...

01 September 2013

Case Study: The Bow, Calgary

James Barnes, Foster + Partners; Jonathan Hendricks, Yolles

The Bow is the latest and most ambitious high-rise development in the Canadian city of Calgary. The client’s aim was to create a world-class building...

01 December 2012

Canada Grows Taller

CTBUH Research

Twenty-six buildings taller than 150 meters have been built in Canada since 2005 and it added four buildings taller than 200 meters in 2012, the...

05 March 2008

The Bow: Unique Diagrid Structural System for a Sustainable Tall Building

Barry Charnish & Terry McDonnell, Halcrow Yolles

The Bow features a distinctive design that not only caters to occupants and surrounding residents, but also reduces energy consumption compared to a conventional tower.

7 November 2013

Foster + Partners Present on The Bow

Nigel Dancey, Senior Partner at Foster + Partners, presents on The Bow, the CTBUH Best Tall Buildings Americas 2013 Winner at this year's awards symposium.

7 November 2013

Foster + Partners Present on The Bow

The winner of the Best Tall Building Americas award, The Bow is stunning as a form and functions well from an environmental and urban standpoint. It serves as a rare example of an iconic design resulting from the most practical, yet creative, response to site constraints.

1 November 2013

The Bow Chosen as Featured Building

The Bow is both stunning as a form and functions well from an environmental and urban standpoint, especially in the context of a harsh northern climate.

1 September 2013

CTBUH Releases Case Study on The Bow

The Bow is the latest and most ambitious high-rise development in the Canadian city of Calgary. The client’s aim was to create a world-class building that would be a defining landmark on the city’s skyline.

1 December 2012

CTBUH Research: Canada Grows Taller

Twenty-six buildings taller than 150 meters have been built in Canada since 2005 and it added four buildings taller than 200 meters in 2012, the most ever in a single year.

5 March 2008

Paper on The Bow's Unique Diagrid Structural System by Halcrow Yolles

The Bow features a distinctive design that not only caters to occupants and surrounding residents, but also reduces energy consumption compared to a conventional tower.

3 March 2008

Halcrow Yolles Presents on The Bow

Barry Charnish, Halcrow Yolles presented the new 59 story “Bow” project for EnCana Corporation at the CTBUH 8th World Congress in Dubai. Once complete, it will be the tallest building in Calgary and Western Canada at nearly 247 meters (or 810 feet) high. The building is one of the largest commercial office developments in Canada with 180,000 square meters (or 2 million square feet) of total floor space. This presentation described the structural design considerations of the lateral system, some construction methods, and the unique sustainable features incorporated into the building.

1 March 2008

Diagrid Structural System for a Tall Building

The Bow features a distinctive design that not only caters to occupants and surrounding residents, but also reduces energy consumption compared to a conventional tower.