Wangjing SOHO T3
Beijing
Height

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

1
To Tip:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).

200 m / 656 ft
2
Architectural:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

200 m / 656 ft
3
Occupied:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest occupied floor within the building.

170 m / 558 ft
Floors

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

45
Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

3
1 2 3 Wangjing SOHO T3 Outline
Height 200 m / 656 ft
Floors 45
Official Name

The current legal building name.

Wangjing SOHO T3
Other Names

Other names the building has commonly been known as, including former names, common informal names, local names, etc.

??SOHO T3
Name of Complex

A complex is a group of buildings which are designed and built as pieces of a greater development.

Type

CTBUH collects data on two major types of tall structures: 'Buildings' and 'Telecommunications / Observation Towers.' A 'Building' is a structure where at least 50% of the height is occupied by usable floor area. A 'Telecommunications / Observation Tower' is a structure where less than 50% of the structure's height is occupied by usable floor area. Only 'Buildings' are eligible for the CTBUH 'Tallest Buildings' lists.

Building
Status
Completed
Architecturally Topped Out
Structurally Topped Out
Under Construction
Proposed
On Hold
Never Completed
Vision
Competition Entry
Canceled
Proposed Renovation
Under Renovation
Renovated
Under Demolition
Demolished
Completed, 2014
Country

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of Country, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

City

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of City, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

Postal Code
100102
Function

A single-function tall building is defined as one where 85% or more of its usable floor area is dedicated to a single usage. Thus a building with 90% office floor area would be said to be an "office" building, irrespective of other minor functions it may also contain.

A mixed-use tall building contains two or more functions (or uses), where each of the functions occupy a significant proportion of the tower's total space. Support areas such as car parks and mechanical plant space do not constitute mixed-use functions. Functions are denoted on CTBUH "Tallest Building" lists in descending order, e.g., "hotel/office" indicates hotel function above office function.

office
Structural Material

Steel
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from steel. Note that a building of steel construction with a floor system of concrete planks or concrete slab on top of steel beams is still considered a “steel” structure as the concrete elements are not acting as the primary structure.

Reinforced Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from concrete which has been cast in place and utilizes steel reinforcement bars.

Precast Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning system are constructed from steel reinforced concrete which has been precast as individual components and assembled together on-site.

Mixed-Structure
Utilizes distinct systems (e.g. steel, concrete, timber), one on top of the other. For example, a steel/concrete indicates a steel structural system located on top of a concrete structural system, with the opposite true of concrete/steel.

Composite
A combination of materials (e.g. steel, concrete, timber) are used together in the main structural elements. Examples include buildings which utilize: steel columns with a floor system of reinforced concrete beams; a steel frame system with a concrete core; concrete-encased steel columns; concrete-filled steel tubes; etc. Where known, the CTBUH database breaks out the materials used in a composite building’s core, columns, and floor spanning separately.

composite
Core
Reinforced Concrete
Columns
Concrete Filled Steel
Floor Spanning
Steel
Official Website
Height

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

Architectural
200 m / 656 ft
To Tip
200 m / 656 ft
Occupied
169.97 m / 558 ft
Floors Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

45
Floors Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

3
# of Parking Spaces

Number of Parking Spaces refers to the total number of car parking spaces contained within a particular building.

1809
Tower GFA

Tower GFA refers to the total gross floor area within the tower footprint, not including adjoining podiums, connected buildings or other towers within the development.

125,307 m² / 1,348,793 ft²
Rankings
#
18
Tallest in Beijing
#
11
Tallest Office Building in Beijing
#
429
Tallest Composite Building in Asia
#
13
Tallest Composite Building in Beijing
Construction Schedule
2009

Proposed

2011

Construction Start

2014

Completed

Owner/Developer
SOHO China Co. Ltd
Architect
Structural Engineer
MEP Engineer
Contractor

Landscape

LEED

Environmental Market Solutions, Inc.

Lighting

Lightdesign

Way Finding

Ikonik

Wind

Yonsei University

Cladding

Jangho Group Co., Ltd.

Elevator

Fujitec Co., Ltd.

CTBUH Awards & Distinctions

Best Tall Building China 2016 China Excellence

2016 CTBUH Awards

Best Tall Building Asia & Australasia 2014 Award of Excellence

2014 CTBUH Awards

CTBUH Initiatives

Videos

18 October 2016 | Beijing

The issue of skyscraper form and expression being appropriate to cultural and social context is currently a hotly debated topic in China, as well as...

Research

28 October 2019

Paolo Zilli, Zaha Hadid Architects

The technological component in architecture has dramatically increased during the last 50 years. Buildings react automatically to various inputs and the machine-à-habiter—a main concept of...

About Wangjing SOHO T3

The Wangjing SOHO Project is designed as three dynamic mountain- or fish-like forms, pulling energy through the site with their convex forms. The juxtaposition of the towers affords a continuously changing, elegant and fluid view from all directions. The exterior skin of the towers consists of flowing, shimmering ribbons of aluminum and glass that continuously wrap around the buildings and embrace the sky, threading through a landscape with approximately 60,000 square meters of green area open to the public. Inspired by the surrounding movement of the city, the sun, the wind, the project aims to lend a strong identity to the Wangjing area, creating a gateway-beacon that can be seen by travelers along the highway heading to or from Beijing Capital International Airport.

The site for the proposed Wangjing SOHO Project is located in the Chaoyang District of northeast Beijing, between Fourth and Fifth Ring Roads. The area contains the offices of many Chinese startup companies, as well as global companies such as Microsoft, Daimler, Caterpillar, Panasonic, Nortel and Siemens. It is conveniently located on the way to the airport and near various metro stations, and is home to a vibrant mix of local and international residents and visitors.

The building program is a mixed-use commercial development, containing offices and retail above grade, retail below grade in B1 basement level, and parking and mechanical in the B2, B3 and B4 basements. The composition of the towers extends into the surrounding landscape, with flowing lines creating paths of movement and exciting activity zones of shopping and leisure. The lines of movement extend to the perimeter and integrate all the green areas around the site. Between the main building towers is a “canyon” of retail shops and activities, and several pavilion gate buildings that create a shopping street at the ground level. There are two sunken garden courts east and west of the canyon that continue the landscaped paths down to the retail concourse below.

The main tower entrance lobbies, facing outwards to the city, welcome visitors into large dynamic halls that direct one into the office tower floors above, and to the breezeway and retail levels at the second floor and sunken garden levels below. Up above in the office towers, there are simple open-plan office spaces offering natural daylight and continuous panoramic views in all directions.

Most of the roofs are covered with louvers and top of the roof surfaces are coated with highly reflective material, in order to mitigate the heat-island effect in the city. The buildings have horizontal bands of white aluminum and double-insulated unitized glazing systems that can provide overhangs for sun shading, while providing maintenance terraces and water collection.

To encourage more sustainable transportation access, special parking spots are reserved for low-emission cars; bicycle parking and shower facilities are also provided. Direct access to subway stations and bus stops nearby have been integrated into the planning.

For better indoor environment quality for the occupants, the fresh air rate per person provided exceeds the ASHRAE standard by 30 percent. Highly efficient filters are installed to remove PM2.5 particles in the AC system. In the interior design, low-volatile organic compound (VOC) materials are carefully chosen to eliminate pollution from the outset.

CTBUH Awards & Distinctions

Best Tall Building China 2016 China Excellence

2016 CTBUH Awards

Best Tall Building Asia & Australasia 2014 Award of Excellence

2014 CTBUH Awards

18 October 2016 | Beijing

The issue of skyscraper form and expression being appropriate to cultural and social context is currently a hotly debated topic in China, as well as...

17 October 2016 | Beijing

Monday October 17, 2016. Shenzhen, China. Samuel So, JLL, presents at the 2016 China Conference Session 3c: Building Operation. China is the global epicenter of...

19 September 2012 | Beijing

This presentation examines SOHO China’s process of developing and realizing ideas and strategies, from the client’s perspective. Market analysis, urban relationship, design parametric, sustainability methodology...

28 October 2019

Paolo Zilli, Zaha Hadid Architects

The technological component in architecture has dramatically increased during the last 50 years. Buildings react automatically to various inputs and the machine-à-habiter—a main concept of...

31 December 2014

Daniel Safarik, Antony Wood, Marty Carver & Marshall Gerometta, CTBUH

An All-Time Record 97 Buildings of 200 Meters or Higher Completed in 2014 and 2014 showed further shifts towards Asia, and also surprising developments in...

19 September 2012

Jerry Yin, SOHO

As one of the largest developers of commercial projects in China, SOHO China helped pioneer the concept of large-scale master-planned developments in Beijing, each with...

13 May 2016

The inaugural CITAB-CTBUH China Tall Building Awards were held at Shanghai Tower culminating with Bund SOHO winning China Best Tall Building Overall Award.

25 February 2016

CITAB and CTBUH are pleased to announce the award recipients for the inaugural CITAB-CTBUH 2016 China Tall Building Awards.

31 December 2014

An All-Time Record 97 Buildings of 200 Meters or Higher Completed in 2014 and 2014 showed further shifts towards Asia, and also surprising developments in building functions and structural materials.