500
Global
Height rank
56 Leonard
New York City United States
Height

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

1
To Tip:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).

250.2 m / 821 ft
2
Architectural:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

250.2 m / 821 ft
3
Occupied:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest occupied floor within the building.

242.6 m / 796 ft
1 2 3 56 Leonard  Outline
Floors

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

57
Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

1
Height 250.24 m / 821 ft
Floors 57
Official Name

The current legal building name.

56 Leonard
Type

CTBUH collects data on two major types of tall structures: 'Buildings' and 'Telecommunications / Observation Towers.' A 'Building' is a structure where at least 50% of the height is occupied by usable floor area. A 'Telecommunications / Observation Tower' is a structure where less than 50% of the structure's height is occupied by usable floor area. Only 'Buildings' are eligible for the CTBUH 'Tallest Buildings' lists.

Building
Status
Completed
Architecturally Topped Out
Structurally Topped Out
Under Construction
Proposed
On Hold
Never Completed
Vision
Competition Entry
Canceled
Proposed Renovation
Under Renovation
Renovated
Under Demolition
Demolished
Completed, 2016
Country

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of Country, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

City

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of City, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

Postal Code
10013
Function

A single-function tall building is defined as one where 85% or more of its usable floor area is dedicated to a single usage. Thus a building with 90% office floor area would be said to be an "office" building, irrespective of other minor functions it may also contain.

A mixed-use tall building contains two or more functions (or uses), where each of the functions occupy a significant proportion of the tower's total space. Support areas such as car parks and mechanical plant space do not constitute mixed-use functions. Functions are denoted on CTBUH "Tallest Building" lists in descending order, e.g., "hotel/office" indicates hotel function above office function.

residential
Structural Material

Steel
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from steel. Note that a building of steel construction with a floor system of concrete planks or concrete slab on top of steel beams is still considered a “steel” structure as the concrete elements are not acting as the primary structure.

Reinforced Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from concrete which has been cast in place and utilizes steel reinforcement bars.

Precast Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning system are constructed from steel reinforced concrete which has been precast as individual components and assembled together on-site.

Mixed-Structure
Utilizes distinct systems (e.g. steel, concrete, timber), one on top of the other. For example, a steel/concrete indicates a steel structural system located on top of a concrete structural system, with the opposite true of concrete/steel.

Composite
A combination of materials (e.g. steel, concrete, timber) are used together in the main structural elements. Examples include buildings which utilize: steel columns with a floor system of reinforced concrete beams; a steel frame system with a concrete core; concrete-encased steel columns; concrete-filled steel tubes; etc. Where known, the CTBUH database breaks out the materials used in a composite building’s core, columns, and floor spanning separately.

concrete
Official Website
Height

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

Architectural
250.24 m / 821 ft
To Tip
250.24 m / 821 ft
Occupied
242.6 m / 796 ft
Floors Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

57
Floors Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

1
# of Apartments

Number of Apartments refers to the total number of residential units (including both rental units and condominiums) contained within a particular building.

146
Tower GFA

Tower GFA refers to the total gross floor area within the tower footprint, not including adjoining podiums, connected buildings or other towers within the development.

46,452 m² / 500,005 ft²
Rankings
#
500
Tallest in the World
#
74
Tallest in North America
#
66
Tallest in United States
#
27
Tallest in New York City
#
91
Tallest Residential Building in the World
#
14
Tallest Residential Building in North America
#
12
Tallest Residential Building in United States
#
9
Tallest Residential Building in New York City
#
216
Tallest Concrete Building in the World
#
30
Tallest Concrete Building in North America
#
25
Tallest Concrete Building in United States
#
11
Tallest Concrete Building in New York City
Construction Schedule
2008

Construction Start

2016

Completed

Owner/Developer
Alexico Group
Architect
Herzog & de Meuron Architekten
Costas Kondylis Design
Structural Engineer
WSP Cantor Seinuk
MEP Engineer

Damping

Environmental

Geotechnical

Roofing

Vidaris, Inc.

Wind

Elevator

Formwork

CTBUH Awards & Distinctions

Construction Award 2018 Award of Excellence

2018 CTBUH Awards

CTBUH Initiatives

CTBUH Study Examines Tallest Buildings with Dampers


22 August 2018 - CTBUH Research

28 October 2015 - Building Tour

See more

Videos

31 May 2018 | New York City

56 Leonard has been called the “Jenga” building due to its cantilevered floors, as well as the irregular spacing and location of the balconies throughout...

See more

Research

26 October 2015

Rick Cook & Jared Gilbert, COOKFOX Architects

New York’s most iconic buildings, the early 20th-Century high rises, were designed as aspirational symbols of urban life with carefully sculpted forms that mediate between...

See more

About 56 Leonard

56 Leonard Street has a Jenga-like design with cantilevering floor slabs. Pritzker Prize-winning Swiss architecture firm Herzog & de Meuron describes the building as "houses stacked in the sky" wanting to destroy the common anonymous extrusion of a glass tower. Residences have window walls up to 14 feet and private outdoor spaces to reveal views of the cityscape.

CTBUH Awards & Distinctions

Construction Award 2018 Award of Excellence

2018 CTBUH Awards

31 May 2018 | New York City

56 Leonard has been called the “Jenga” building due to its cantilevered floors, as well as the irregular spacing and location of the balconies throughout...

26 October 2015 | New York City

New York’s most iconic buildings, the early 20th-Century high rises, were designed as aspirational symbols of urban life with carefully sculpted forms that mediate between...

18 September 2014 | New York City

2014 Shanghai International Conference Closing Plenary Questions & Answers session with speakers David Malott, CTBUH Chairman-Elect / Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates, David Gianotten of OMA,...

16 September 2014 | New York City

56 Leonard, a new 57-story residential development, totaling 480,000 GSF rises 825 feet from street level. At about 78’ in width, the slenderness ratio is...

26 October 2015

Rick Cook & Jared Gilbert, COOKFOX Architects

New York’s most iconic buildings, the early 20th-Century high rises, were designed as aspirational symbols of urban life with carefully sculpted forms that mediate between...

22 October 2015

CTBUH Research

A timeline of skyscraper completions in New York uncannily resembles the boom and bust cycles of the United States in the 20th and early 21st...

22 October 2015

New York 2015 Conference Special

To commemorate the CTBUH 2015 International Conference, some of the most prominent voices in the New York tall building industry today – all of whom...

16 September 2014

Silvian Marcus, WSP

56 Leonard, a new 57-story residential development, totaling 480,000 GSF rises 825 feet from street level. At about 78’ in width, the slenderness ratio is...

14 September 2014

Daniel Safarik, CTBUH

The survival of humanity on this planet relies on a radical repositioning of our cities. In the face of unprecedented global population growth, urbanization, pollution...

22 August 2018

CTBUH Study Examines Tallest Buildings with Dampers

CTBUH has released a Tall Buildings in Numbers (TBIN) interactive data study on the world's tallest buildings with dampers.

28 October 2015

CTBUH 2015 delegates toured around the construction of 56 Leonard Street, which is set to be one of the top luxury residential towers in downtown Manhattan.

16 September 2014

Building Movement and Damping Workshop, Shanghai 2014

The Building Movement and Damping Technical Workshop reviewed some of the latest strategies and concepts for helping tall buildings avoid movement in seismic and wind events.