32
Global
Height rank
Al Hamra Tower
Kuwait City
Height

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

1
To Tip:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).

412.6 m / 1,354 ft
2
Architectural:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

412.6 m / 1,354 ft
3
Occupied:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest occupied floor within the building.

371.4 m / 1,218 ft
Floors

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

80
Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

3
1 2 3 Al Hamra Tower Outline
Height 412.6 m / 1,354 ft
Floors 80
Official Name

The current legal building name.

Al Hamra Tower
Other Names

Other names the building has commonly been known as, including former names, common informal names, local names, etc.

Al Hamra Firdous Tower
Type

CTBUH collects data on two major types of tall structures: 'Buildings' and 'Telecommunications / Observation Towers.' A 'Building' is a structure where at least 50% of the height is occupied by usable floor area. A 'Telecommunications / Observation Tower' is a structure where less than 50% of the structure's height is occupied by usable floor area. Only 'Buildings' are eligible for the CTBUH 'Tallest Buildings' lists.

Building
Status
Completed
Architecturally Topped Out
Structurally Topped Out
Under Construction
Proposed
On Hold
Never Completed
Vision
Competition Entry
Canceled
Proposed Renovation
Under Renovation
Renovated
Under Demolition
Demolished
Completed, 2011
Country

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of Country, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

City

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of City, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

Postal Code
13001
Function

A single-function tall building is defined as one where 85% or more of its usable floor area is dedicated to a single usage. Thus a building with 90% office floor area would be said to be an "office" building, irrespective of other minor functions it may also contain.

A mixed-use tall building contains two or more functions (or uses), where each of the functions occupy a significant proportion of the tower's total space. Support areas such as car parks and mechanical plant space do not constitute mixed-use functions. Functions are denoted on CTBUH "Tallest Building" lists in descending order, e.g., "hotel/office" indicates hotel function above office function.

office
Structural Material

Steel
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from steel. Note that a building of steel construction with a floor system of concrete planks or concrete slab on top of steel beams is still considered a “steel” structure as the concrete elements are not acting as the primary structure.

Reinforced Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from concrete which has been cast in place and utilizes steel reinforcement bars.

Precast Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning system are constructed from steel reinforced concrete which has been precast as individual components and assembled together on-site.

Mixed-Structure
Utilizes distinct systems (e.g. steel, concrete, timber), one on top of the other. For example, a steel/concrete indicates a steel structural system located on top of a concrete structural system, with the opposite true of concrete/steel.

Composite
A combination of materials (e.g. steel, concrete, timber) are used together in the main structural elements. Examples include buildings which utilize: steel columns with a floor system of reinforced concrete beams; a steel frame system with a concrete core; concrete-encased steel columns; concrete-filled steel tubes; etc. Where known, the CTBUH database breaks out the materials used in a composite building’s core, columns, and floor spanning separately.

concrete
Official Website
Height

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

Architectural
412.6 m / 1,354 ft
To Tip
412.6 m / 1,354 ft
Occupied
371.37 m / 1,218 ft
Floors Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

80
Floors Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

3
# of Parking Spaces

Number of Parking Spaces refers to the total number of car parking spaces contained within a particular building.

1460
# of Elevators

Number of Elevators refers to the total number of elevator cars (not shafts) contained within a particular building (including public, private and freight elevators).

43
Tower GFA

Tower GFA refers to the total gross floor area within the tower footprint, not including adjoining podiums, connected buildings or other towers within the development.

178,061 m² / 1,916,633 ft²
Rankings
#
32
Tallest in the World
#
5
Tallest in Middle East
#
1
Tallest in Kuwait City
#
11
Tallest Office Building in the World
#
1
Tallest Office Building in Middle East
#
1
Tallest Office Building in Kuwait
#
1
Tallest Office Building in Kuwait City
#
5
Tallest Concrete Building in the World
#
2
Tallest Concrete Building in Middle East
#
1
Tallest Concrete Building in Kuwait
#
1
Tallest Concrete Building in Kuwait City
Construction Schedule
2005

Proposed

2005

Construction Start

2011

Completed

Owner
Al Hamra Real Estate Co.
Developer
Ajial Real Estate and Entertainment; Al Hamra Real Estate Co.
Architect
Structural Engineer
MEP Engineer
Contractor
Ahmadiah Contracting and Trading Company

Acoustics

Shen Milsom Wilke, Inc.

Commissioning

Façade Maintenance

Entek Engineering Ltd.

Fire

Geotechnical

Consultancy Group Company

Landscape

Francis Landscapes

Life Safety

Lighting

OVI Lighting

Security

Shen Milsom Wilke, Inc.

Vertical Transportation

Wind

BMT Fluid Mechanics Ltd.

Elevator

Sealants

CTBUH Awards & Distinctions

Best Tall Building Middle East & Africa 2012 Award of Excellence

2012 CTBUH Awards

CTBUH Initiatives

The Middle East: 30+ Years of Building Tall


28 November 2018 - CTBUH Research

Vertical Transportation: Ascent & Acceleration


12 September 2017 - CTBUH Research

Videos

18 October 2012 | Kuwait City

The Al Hamra Firdous Tower was intended to stand as an icon to symbolize national pride, while also providing highly leasable office space. To successfully...

Research

20 October 2018

CTBUH Research

The Middle East region is hosting its first CTBUH International Conference since 2008. In that year, there were 119 completed buildings of 150 meters or...

About Al Hamra Tower

Al Hamra Tower stands as an icon symbolizing Kuwaiti national pride. The form of the building appears to be cut from a prism, a void taken from the center, with each floor plate rotating counter-clockwise around the core. The result is a spiraling geometry that unravels to the top. The void, which shifts from west to east, exposes the solid southern core wall, which is visually distinct from the other glazed and transparent walls wrapping around the rest of the building. Two solid “flared walls” provide the transition between these two conditions, covering the complex geometry of the rotating floor plates.

The southern façade, exposed through the central void, is clad in stone with angled window cuts to respond to the intense solar conditions of the area. The same material treatment is given to the flared walls that cover the curvilinear faces along the edge of the spiral void, only without window openings. The concrete construction of these elements also allows them to act as thermal mass walls, slowing heat gain during the day and releasing stored heat at night. The curved east, north, and west façades are clad in vision glass, providing clear views of the surrounding city and Kuwait Bay while also optimizing the spaces against glare and heat gain.

At the north side of the building is the main lobby, a 24-meter-high space that extends from the building core to the perimeter frame. To increase the area of the lobby, the columns along the exterior slope inwards, forming an intricate lamella structure that is both functional and elegant. At the top of the tower, a 40-meter-high space with a restaurant and observation deck provides far-reaching views of the city. To produce these unobstructed views, a cantilevered steel truss system was employed to support the roof and curtain wall glazing, reducing the necessary columns in the space.

CTBUH Awards & Distinctions

Best Tall Building Middle East & Africa 2012 Award of Excellence

2012 CTBUH Awards

18 October 2012 | Kuwait City

The Al Hamra Firdous Tower was intended to stand as an icon to symbolize national pride, while also providing highly leasable office space. To successfully...

18 October 2012 | Kuwait City

As one of the Featured Finalists invited to present at the 2012 Awards Symposium, Al Hamra Tower provided a diverse array of topics for designers...

10 October 2011 | Kuwait City

Aybars Asci specializes in the design implementation of complex commercial and institutional projects. He presents on the Al Hamra Firdous Tower.

20 October 2018

CTBUH Research

The Middle East region is hosting its first CTBUH International Conference since 2008. In that year, there were 119 completed buildings of 150 meters or...

14 November 2013

CTBUH Research

Twenty years ago, the Middle East contained only one skyscraper over 150 meters in height. It is now estimated that by the end of 2015...

31 December 2011

Nathaniel Hollister & Antony Wood, CTBUH

The annual story is becoming a familiar one: 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, and now 2011 have each sequentially broke the record for the most 200...

10 October 2011

Aybars Asci & Mark Sarkisian, SOM

Al Hamra Firdous Tower, rising 412 meters and scheduled for completion in fall 2011, will be the tallest structure in Kuwait. A new landmark, this...

01 November 2007

Mark Sarkisian, Neville Mathias, Aaron Mazeika & et al, SOM

At 412m tall on completion, the Al Hamra Tower is set to be amongst the tallest buildings in the world. Setting it apart from other...

28 November 2018

The Middle East: 30+ Years of Building Tall

CTBUH has released a Tall Buildings in Numbers (TBIN) interactive data study examining the relationship between high-rise growth and population in the Middle East.

12 September 2017

Vertical Transportation: Ascent & Acceleration

CTBUH partnered with Guinness World Records to identify the commercial building with the fastest elevator speeds and longest vertical runs.

13 October 2016

The Council is pleased to announce the Top Company Rankings for numerous disciplines as derived from the list of projects appearing in 100 of the World’s Tallest Buildings.

1 August 2013

Al Hamra Firdous Tower Chosen as Featured Building

The art of high-rise building design embraces, at least in part, how the observer reads the rise of the form from the earth to the sky.

19 October 2012

Awards Symposium Puts Spotlight on Achievement, Future

2012 CTBUH tall building award winners, finalists and lifetime achievement award winners were not attending the annual symposium to talk about record heights and flashy designs.

14 January 2012

CTBUH India: High-rise Building Technology

CTBUH Chairman Timothy Johnson, of NBBJ, and CTBUH Advisory Group Member Ahmad Abdelrazaq, of Samsung, recently spoke at a CTBUH seminar on building technology.