12
Global
Height rank

International Commerce Centre

Hong Kong
Height
1
To Tip:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).

484 m / 1,588 ft
2
Architectural:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

484 m / 1,588 ft
3
Occupied:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest occupied floor within the building.

468.8 m / 1,538 ft
Floors
Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

108
Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

4
1 2 3 International Commerce Centre Outline
Height 484.0 m / 1,588 ft
Floors 108
Official Name
The current legal building name.

International Commerce Centre

Other Names
Other names the building has commonly been known as, including former names, common informal names, local names, etc.

ICC

Name of Complex
A complex is a group of buildings which are designed and built as pieces of a greater development.

Union Square

Type
CTBUH collects data on two major types of tall structures: 'Buildings' and 'Telecommunications / Observation Towers.' A 'Building' is a structure where at least 50% of the height is occupied by usable floor area. A 'Telecommunications / Observation Tower' is a structure where less than 50% of the structure's height is occupied by usable floor area. Only 'Buildings' are eligible for the CTBUH 'Tallest Buildings' lists.

Building

Status
Completed
Architecturally Topped Out
Structurally Topped Out
Under Construction
Proposed
On Hold
Never Completed
Vision
Competition Entry
Canceled
Proposed Renovation
Under Renovation
Renovated
Under Demolition
Demolished

Completed, 2010

Country
The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of Country, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

China

City
The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of City, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

Hong Kong

Function
A single-function tall building is defined as one where 85% or more of its usable floor area is dedicated to a single usage. Thus a building with 90% office floor area would be said to be an "office" building, irrespective of other minor functions it may also contain.

A mixed-use tall building contains two or more functions (or uses), where each of the functions occupy a significant proportion of the tower's total space. Support areas such as car parks and mechanical plant space do not constitute mixed-use functions. Functions are denoted on CTBUH "Tallest Building" lists in descending order, e.g., "hotel/office" indicates hotel function above office function.

hotel / office

Structural Material
Steel
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from steel. Note that a building of steel construction with a floor system of concrete planks or concrete slab on top of steel beams is still considered a “steel” structure as the concrete elements are not acting as the primary structure.

Reinforced Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from concrete which has been cast in place and utilizes steel reinforcement bars.

Precast Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning system are constructed from steel reinforced concrete which has been precast as individual components and assembled together on-site.

Mixed-Structure
Utilizes distinct systems (e.g. steel, concrete, timber), one on top of the other. For example, a steel/concrete indicates a steel structural system located on top of a concrete structural system, with the opposite true of concrete/steel.

Composite
A combination of materials (e.g. steel, concrete, timber) are used together in the main structural elements. Examples include buildings which utilize: steel columns with a floor system of reinforced concrete beams; a steel frame system with a concrete core; concrete-encased steel columns; concrete-filled steel tubes; etc. Where known, the CTBUH database breaks out the materials used in a composite building’s core, columns, and floor spanning separately.

composite

Core
Reinforced Concrete
Columns
Reinforced Concrete
Floor Spanning
Steel
Height
Architectural
Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

484.0 m / 1,588 ft

To Tip
Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).
484.0 m / 1,588 ft
Occupied
Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest occupied floor within the building.
468.8 m / 1,538 ft
Observatory
387.8 m / 1,272 ft
Floors Above Ground
The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

108

Floors Below Ground
The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

4

# of Hotel Rooms
Number of Hotel Rooms refers to the total number of hotel rooms contained within a particular building.

312

# of Parking Spaces
Number of Parking Spaces refers to the total number of car parking spaces contained within a particular building.

1700

# of Elevators
Number of Elevators refers to the total number of elevator cars (not shafts) contained within a particular building (including public, private and freight elevators).

86

Top Elevator Speed
Top Elevator Speed refers to the top speed capable of being achieved by an elevator within a particular building, measured in meters per second.

9 m/s

Tower GFA
Tower GFA refers to the total gross floor area within the tower footprint, not including adjoining podiums, connected buildings or other towers within the development.

274,064 m² / 2,950,000 ft²

Rankings
#
12
Tallest in the World
#
9
Tallest in Asia
#
8
Tallest in China
#
1
Tallest in Hong Kong
#
8
Tallest Mixed-use Building in the World
#
6
Tallest Mixed-use Building in Asia
#
5
Tallest Mixed-use Building in China
#
1
Tallest Mixed-use Building in Hong Kong
#
10
Tallest Composite Building in the World
#
9
Tallest Composite Building in Asia
#
8
Tallest Composite Building in China
#
1
Tallest Composite Building in Hong Kong
Construction Schedule
2000

Proposed

2002

Construction Start

2010

Completed

Architect
Design

Usually involved in the front end design, with a "typical" condition being that of a leadership role through either Schematic Design or Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Structural Engineer
Design

The Design Engineer is usually involved in the front end design, typically taking the leadership role in the Schematic Design and Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Peer Review

The Peer Review Engineer traditionally comments on the information produced by another party, and to render second opinions, but not to initiate what the design looks like from the start.

MEP Engineer
Design

The Design Engineer is usually involved in the front end design, typically taking the leadership role in the Schematic Design and Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Project Manager

The CTBUH lists a project manager when a specific firm has been commissioned to oversee this aspect of a tall building’s design/construction. When the project management efforts are handled by the developer, main contract, or architect, this field will be omitted.

Contractor
Main Contractor

The main contractor is the supervisory contractor of all construction work on a project, management of sub-contractors and vendors, etc. May be referred to as "Construction Manager," however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Main Contractor" exclusively.

Other Consultant

Other Consultant refers to other organizations which provided significant consultation services for a building project (e.g. wind consultants, environmental consultants, fire and life safety consultants, etc).

Façade

These are firms that consult on the design of a building's façade. May often be referred to as "Cladding," "Envelope," "Exterior Wall," or "Curtain Wall" Consultant, however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Façade Consultant" exclusively.

Fire
Quantity Surveyor
Vertical Transportation
Material Supplier

Material Supplier refers to organizations which supplied significant systems/materials for a building project (e.g. elevator suppliers, facade suppliers, etc).

Construction Hoists
Elevator
Façade Maintenance Equipment
Architect
Design

Usually involved in the front end design, with a "typical" condition being that of a leadership role through either Schematic Design or Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Architect of Record

Usually takes on the balance of the architectural effort not executed by the "Design Architect," typically responsible for the construction documents, conforming to local codes, etc. May often be referred to as "Executive," "Associate," or "Local" Architect, however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Architect of Record" exclusively.

Wong & Ouyang
Structural Engineer
Design

The Design Engineer is usually involved in the front end design, typically taking the leadership role in the Schematic Design and Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Peer Review

The Peer Review Engineer traditionally comments on the information produced by another party, and to render second opinions, but not to initiate what the design looks like from the start.

MEP Engineer
Design

The Design Engineer is usually involved in the front end design, typically taking the leadership role in the Schematic Design and Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Project Manager

The CTBUH lists a project manager when a specific firm has been commissioned to oversee this aspect of a tall building’s design/construction. When the project management efforts are handled by the developer, main contract, or architect, this field will be omitted.

Contractor
Main Contractor

The main contractor is the supervisory contractor of all construction work on a project, management of sub-contractors and vendors, etc. May be referred to as "Construction Manager," however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Main Contractor" exclusively.

Other Consultant

Other Consultant refers to other organizations which provided significant consultation services for a building project (e.g. wind consultants, environmental consultants, fire and life safety consultants, etc).

Artist
Hong Kong Arts Development Council
Façade

These are firms that consult on the design of a building's façade. May often be referred to as "Cladding," "Envelope," "Exterior Wall," or "Curtain Wall" Consultant, however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Façade Consultant" exclusively.

Fire
Interiors
LTW Designworks
Landscape
Belt Collins & Associates
Lighting
Lighting Planners Associates
Marketing
Wordsearch
Quantity Surveyor
Vertical Transportation
Way Finding
Atelier Pacific Limited
Material Supplier

Material Supplier refers to organizations which supplied significant systems/materials for a building project (e.g. elevator suppliers, facade suppliers, etc).

Construction Hoists
Elevator
Schindler; Sematic S.r.l.
Façade Maintenance Equipment
Fire Proofing
Grace Construction Products
Paint/Coating
AkzoNobel
Sealants
Steel
China Construction Steel Structure Corporation

CTBUH Awards & Distinctions

Performance Award 2014 Winner

2014 CTBUH Awards

10 Year Award 2020 Award of Excellence

2020 CTBUH Awards

Best Tall Building Asia & Australasia 2011 Award of Excellence

2011 CTBUH Awards

Videos

20 October 2016 | Hong Kong

ICC – Rising High for the Future of Hong Kong

Thursday October 20, 2016. Hong Kong, China. Tony Tang of Sun Hung Kai Properties Limited presents at the 2016 China Conference Plenary 6: Hong Kong...

Research

20 March 2020

The Tallest 20 in 2020: Predictions vs. Reality

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In the first edition of the 2012 Journal, CTBUH published a Tall Buildings in Numbers study titled Tallest 20 in 2020: Era of the Megatall—The...

About International Commerce Centre

International Commerce Centre houses some of the most prominent financial institutions in the world. The building is routinely recognized as a paragon of good management, from a commercial, environmental, and community standpoint.

The level of energy efficiency achieved by the International Commerce Centre is unusual for a tall building, and significant investments have been made in improving energy performance over the years, especially since adapting the ISO 50001 Energy Management Systems certification in 2011. This commitment was followed by more than 50 advanced energy-saving measures. The Energy Utilization Index (EUI) of International Commerce Centre's energy performance in 2013 was 157.3 kWh/sqm, placing it among the top 10 percent of energy-efficient commercial buildings. A computerized building management system manages and controls the energy use in the building. The total energy consumption of the project was reduced from 56.3 million kWh in 2012 to 49.9 million kWh in 2013, a reduction of 6.4 million kWh, or 11 percent.

The air-conditioning system is a high-voltage water-cooled chiller system with a centrifugal separator enhancing the chiller’s coefficient of performance (COP), resulting in an 8 percent reduction in energy consumption. The system's original corrugated aluminum separator box filter was replaced with a more advanced mini-pleat filter, reducing system pressure by 25 percent and consequently reducing energy consumption as well. Management has carried out a life cycle testing program with Hong Kong Polytechnic Unversity, resulting in energy optimization and significant savings of 7 million kWh from 2011 through 2013. International Commerce Centre has saved an estimated HK $7 million (US$900,000) annually through this program.

Other energy-saving features include a low-emission curtain wall, natural lighting of the atrium, the wide adoption of energy-efficient lighting fixtures such as LEDs and T5 fittings, and double-decker elevators with destination control and power regeneration functions. Simple actions such as deactivating elevators during low-use periods are equally important. Through these investments, the building reduced CO2 emissions by 4.2 million kilograms in 2013.

The building’s waste-management program has increased its collection of recyclables from 94,000 kilograms in 2013 to 101,714 kilograms in 2013, an 8.21 percent increase. Participation in the recycling program increased from 60 percent of occupants in 2010 to 90 percent in 2013. Recycling items collected have expanded to include waste paper, plastic and aluminum cans, glass bottles, food waste, chemical waste, and coffee grounds, as well as creative reuse of festival decoration items.

Of course, a building’s initial successes in performance-based design can be undone if occupants are not well-trained and motivated to continue imbuing their daily activities with these principles. The key to achieving high performance lies in International Commerce Centre's intensive, involved relationship with its tenants. Each tenant is assigned its own account manager, who is in frequent contact with the tenant and learns about their requirements in detail. A 24/7 helpdesk is available for tenants, regardless of where they are in the world.

To ensure ongoing “greenkeeping” by occupants and the wider community, International Commerce Centre's management extended its food-waste collection program to the surrounding community, and conducted more than 300 sharing events to promote green principles. The “International Commerce Centre Celsius 26” plan was launched in 2012, maintaining the building’s common areas at 26 degrees C, warmer than typical engineering standards, but still comfortable. Apart from the base building’s energy audit, International Commerce Centre provides free energy audits for its tenants upon request.

By using the helpdesk and computerized building systems as a data-collection and dissemination tool, combined with a high level of direct training, interaction and support of tenants, a “virtuous circle” is formed, in which tenants are motivated to adhere to energy guidelines and to contribute data, which is then reported back to tenants and management.

CTBUH Awards & Distinctions

Performance Award 2014 Winner

2014 CTBUH Awards

10 Year Award 2020 Award of Excellence

2020 CTBUH Awards

Best Tall Building Asia & Australasia 2011 Award of Excellence

2011 CTBUH Awards

Quick Facts

  • The Ozone Bar on the 108th floor is the world's highest cocktail lounge in a building at 468.8 m.

  • The world's highest swimming pool in a building is located on the 108th floor.

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20 October 2016 | Hong Kong

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19 October 2016 | Hong Kong

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19 October 2016 | Hong Kong

From San Diego to Guangzhou: The Story of Marketing Tall Buildings

One of the keys to attracting buyers and tenants for a contemporary tall building is a succinct marketing strategy and a robust understanding of how...

18 October 2016 | Hong Kong

CTBUH Video Interview – Andrew Nicholson

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26 October 2015 | Hong Kong

ICC Hong Kong: Exemplary Performance

The International Commerce Centre (ICC) is a landmark skyscraper located in Hong Kong. It is the tallest building in Hong Kong with office spaces, fine...

06 November 2014 | Hong Kong

CTBUH 13th Annual Awards Dinner

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06 November 2014 | Hong Kong

Interview: International Commerce Centre

Thursday, 6th November 2014. Chicago, USA. Dakki Hui, Senior Property and Facility Manager, Kai Shing Management Services, discusses International Commerce Centre, the Performance Award Winner...

06 November 2014 | Hong Kong

Monthly Video: International Commerce Centre

Thursday, 6th November 2014. Chicago, USA. Dakki Hui, Senior Property and Facility Manager, Kai Shing Management Services, discusses International Commerce Centre, the Performance Award Winner...

06 November 2014 | Hong Kong

Tall Building Performance Award Management + Measurement = Performance: International Commerce Centre

At 98 percent occupancy, the International Commerce Centre houses some of the most prominent financial institutions in the world. The building is routinely recognized as...

20 March 2020

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20 March 2020

The Tallest 20 in 2020: Then and Now

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This research paper undertakes a review of the 2012 report by the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat, “Tallest 20 in 2020: Entering the...

29 July 2019

Highest Special-Purpose Spaces

Since humans first began constructing tall buildings, history has been cluttered with claims of all manner of “highest” records. In this study, we examine those...

01 July 2018

How Much Development Can a Rail Station Lead? A Case Study of Hong Kong

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17 October 2016

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17 October 2016

ICC – Rising High for the Future of Hong Kong

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26 October 2015

ICC Hong Kong: Exemplary Performance

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The International Commerce Centre (ICC) is a landmark skyscraper located in Hong Kong. It is the tallest building in Hong Kong, with office spaces, fine...

13 January 2013

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As the tallest building in Hong Kong, the International Commerce Centre is an icon, not only for its scale, but also for its iconic ‘dragon...

23 September 2012

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20 January 2016

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20 September 2014

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The tour began at Hong Kong’s One Island East, a 298-meter office building. After a day of activity and touring, the tour ended with an evening harbor cruise, on a Chinese junk.

23 September 2012

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Delegates from the Congress flew to Hong Kong to visit one of the tallest cities in the world. The second day included a side trip to Shenzhen, including a private tour of KK100.

1 January 2011

International Commerce Centre Chosen as Featured Building

Soaring 484 meters (1,588 feet) above Victoria Harbor, the International Commerce Centre (ICC) is the essence of Hong Kong in one destination.

31 December 2010

CTBUH Releases Tallest Buildings Completed in 2010

In a year dominated by news coverage of the new “World’s Tallest Building” – Burj Khalifa, Dubai – one may be surprised to learn that, besides being the year in which a building first surpassed the 600, 700, and 800-meter thresholds, 2010 has seen the completion of more skyscrapers than any previous year in history.

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